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  1. #1
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    Troy's Avatar
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    Troy's Steak and Guiness Pie

    Wife loves this so thought others may enjoy.....

    Ingredients:

    ~ 1Kg Braising stewing steak...cheap cut because it will be a long, slow cook


    2-3 Carrots chopped
    4 celery stalks chopped
    1 onion chopped
    2-3 cloves Garlic



    1/2 Kg Mushrooms
    2 tins tomatoes or ratatouille or 1 of each
    tomato paste
    gravy granuals or oxo cube
    2 tblsp flour
    Salt and Pepper
    olive oil
    Couple of good sized knobs of butter
    Mixed herbs
    250g Ready made Puff Pastry

    ....oh and a couple of bottles of Guinness...



    Season flour with S+P, cut beef into bite size cubes and mix in a bowl...



    Add olive oil and butter to a frying pan (high heat) and to a casserole dish low/medium heat).
    Add onions and garlic to casserole and at the same time fry beef in batches and add to casserole when browned...
    I cook beef in 3 batches and add carrots and celery, with the herbs, after the second batch is ready


    To ensure the Veg doesn't stick, I add the tins of tomatoes while the third batch is cooking


    Once last batch of beef is cooked and in casserole, add tomato paste, gravy granules and flour into the frying pan.



    Stir quickly, scraping the beefy bits from the bottom of the pan. Add some of the Guinness to help "clean" the pan....Continue with the Guinness until the pan is nicely cleaned...pouring in the sauce into the casserole as you cook.

    Cook slowly on the hob for 1/12 hours. Check consistency and add a tblsp of butter and a tblsp of flour mixed to thicken (beurre marnie)....or if you prefer thicken with cornflour/water mix. Then add the mushrooms and cook for another 1 1/2 hours.


    Once ready, it can be left to cool and fridge/freeze until ready to make the pies.
    I normally do single portion pies but that is up to you....you should add an eggcup in the middle for large dishes to stop the pastry sagging into the pie.

    Enough to make 6 of the pies below.....


    Brush the pastry with a mix of egg and milk before popping into an oven at 200C for 20-25 minutes.



    Enjoy!

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat klong toey's Avatar
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    Just tracked down your location by the smell of nice pies is that your door bell ringing.

  3. #3
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    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
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    The filling looks great. We do something similar with a slow cooker and leave it on all night.

  4. #4
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    Not bad at all!

    I'd just like to add two crucial tips to make it even better (well three actually)

    1. Your mirepoix should be 2 parts onion, 1 part carrot and 1 part celery.

    2. When cooking veg for a soup/stew/pie one should always start with the onion on high heat and after 2-3 minutes on high, stirring rapidly, turn the fire to low until the onions are translucent but not brown... The celery and carrot aren't such a hassle as their flavor holds well during long cooking times. Cooking the onion properly will make or break a stew/soup/pie filling.. Once all veg are properly cooked you should add the chopped garlic... After 30 seconds of garlic "sweating"
    You then add your liquids, stock, beer, butter. Never let the mixture boil rapidly or it becomes cloudy.. Once it's at a rolling boil,, turn down to a simmer until your satisfied with the flavor.

    And lastly... You go to all this trouble to slap a store bought puff pastry on top of your masterpiece? No no no you DO NOT, Sir.

    Making your own pie crust is rather simple and far better than any "philo dough" you can buy at any supermarket!

    I realize I talk a big cooking game and haven't put up... But for the last 15 years all I've done is cook and run restaurants.. The last 2 years of not having to do so have been rather nice. Though I am itching to make a proper pie, Wellington and Coq Au Vin... I will get around to it.

    Great effort anyhow Sir! Green on its way.

  5. #5
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    Green in your bin Troy super effort mate

    I do love your nice lean beef going in there ,, is that in Thailand mate ? its a job to get a nice lean bit in the UK like that ,, I get so called lean cubed beef rom our local butcher and by the time I,ve cut all the cak out of it , I have to go and buy some more to make a pie
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

  6. #6
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    Looks excellent, Troy.

  7. #7
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    Not enough Guinness it should be in the ratio of two bottles for you one for the pie so you need 6 bottles.

  8. #8
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    Looks damn good! Greened!

  9. #9
    Lord of Swine
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    Looks tasty, but have to say I always feel cheated by pot pie...

  10. #10
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    The meat should not be dusted in flour or even seasoned. It should be thoroughly dried and at room temperature before being placed in a hot oiled pan in small batches of no more than, say, 6 chunks at a time. It is crucial to brown these forming a crust with the fat bits rendered crispy where it appears. Remove them to a dish and set aside until all pieces are browned - too many at one time and they will not fry but will steam, a disaster.

    Sweat the vegetables next in the same pan with the vestiges of the browned meat, adding a little more olive oil. Then add garlic and a concasse of fresh beef tomatoes using only the flesh - tinned tomatoes are too astringent. Once the mix is combined add a full tablespoon of fine flour and stir rigorously into a roux careful not to let it stick. Then, thicken slowly with the Guinness until a slightly bubbling, gloopy soup consistency. Add herbs, bouquet garni is sufficient, a good beef stock cube or gel, a little water, adjust seasoning with salt and fresh black pepper and as soon as it reaches a soft boil pour it all into a casserole pot with the beef pieces - I add a smidgen of marmite and HP brown sauce for a slight kick and helps to give a nice rich colour.

    The pot should be sealed with foil and then covered with a heavy lid and left to simmer very gently on the stove for 90 minutes - two hours on a low heat or, preferably, in the oven at 135c or so. DO NOT PESTER IT or be tempted to break the seal. You should have a wonderfully tender, unctious dark brown stew. At this point I add mushrooms and baby shallots fried in butter and lardons of bacon and leave it on top of the stove for a final simmer of 20 mins or so.

    Works every time.

  11. #11
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    Nice looking pie. Agree with above post re-pastry. Make your own.
    A 'rich' pie deserves a 'rich' pastry.
    4oz butter
    4oz lard
    16oz flour.
    Greened. Lovely pics!

  12. #12
    Newbie ferratus's Avatar
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    Good job Troy, Harrry,s on the money, 2for U 1- 4 the pot. Light a fire everyone,s a boy scout. cookin dinner everyone,s a cheff. only fussy when your not hungry.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by charleyboy View Post
    Nice looking pie. Agree with above post re-pastry. Make your own.
    A 'rich' pie deserves a 'rich' pastry.
    4oz butter
    4oz lard
    16oz flour.
    Greened. Lovely pics!
    No, the richer the content, the lighter the crust for the pie. A simple puff pastry topping is a perfect foil.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat terry57's Avatar
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    Looks bloody fabulous to me.

    I'll eat the Pie and knock down the Guinness whilst you gentleman discuss the finer points of that crust.

    Cheers.

  15. #15
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    Quite fitting I just saw this interesting bit on Guinness:


  16. #16
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    Sound advice from thegent as well. I tend to disagree about the puff pastry bit but whatever slaps your gob, Eh?

  17. #17
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    Thanks for the comments. I may have missed a few steps, like adding the lid to the casserole dish ...... but I'm sure you all got the idea.

    The wife has been hooked on the dish, as it is, for the best part of this winter so I had to put the diet on hold again...

    ...and I thought that is why Guinness came in packs of 6....4 for me and 2 for the pie...

  18. #18
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    Drool, drool, that looks amazing!!! Is anyone coming to Dubai and can get me some Guinness from Duty Free? We have a few pubs here, one pretty near us is The Irish Village. I might have to go soon.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegent View Post
    The meat should not be dusted in flour or even seasoned. It should be thoroughly dried and at room temperature before being placed in a hot oiled pan in small batches of no more than, say, 6 chunks at a time. It is crucial to brown these forming a crust with the fat bits rendered crispy where it appears. Remove them to a dish and set aside until all pieces are browned - too many at one time and they will not fry but will steam, a disaster.

    Sweat the vegetables next in the same pan with the vestiges of the browned meat, adding a little more olive oil. Then add garlic and a concasse of fresh beef tomatoes using only the flesh - tinned tomatoes are too astringent. Once the mix is combined add a full tablespoon of fine flour and stir rigorously into a roux careful not to let it stick. Then, thicken slowly with the Guinness until a slightly bubbling, gloopy soup consistency. Add herbs, bouquet garni is sufficient, a good beef stock cube or gel, a little water, adjust seasoning with salt and fresh black pepper and as soon as it reaches a soft boil pour it all into a casserole pot with the beef pieces - I add a smidgen of marmite and HP brown sauce for a slight kick and helps to give a nice rich colour.

    The pot should be sealed with foil and then covered with a heavy lid and left to simmer very gently on the stove for 90 minutes - two hours on a low heat or, preferably, in the oven at 135c or so. DO NOT PESTER IT or be tempted to break the seal. You should have a wonderfully tender, unctious dark brown stew. At this point I add mushrooms and baby shallots fried in butter and lardons of bacon and leave it on top of the stove for a final simmer of 20 mins or so.

    Works every time.
    Your mechanics have an edgy professional tone to them.
    Nice.

  20. #20
    Lord of Swine
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rural Surin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by thegent View Post
    The meat should not be dusted in flour or even seasoned. It should be thoroughly dried and at room temperature before being placed in a hot oiled pan in small batches of no more than, say, 6 chunks at a time. It is crucial to brown these forming a crust with the fat bits rendered crispy where it appears. Remove them to a dish and set aside until all pieces are browned - too many at one time and they will not fry but will steam, a disaster.

    Sweat the vegetables next in the same pan with the vestiges of the browned meat, adding a little more olive oil. Then add garlic and a concasse of fresh beef tomatoes using only the flesh - tinned tomatoes are too astringent. Once the mix is combined add a full tablespoon of fine flour and stir rigorously into a roux careful not to let it stick. Then, thicken slowly with the Guinness until a slightly bubbling, gloopy soup consistency. Add herbs, bouquet garni is sufficient, a good beef stock cube or gel, a little water, adjust seasoning with salt and fresh black pepper and as soon as it reaches a soft boil pour it all into a casserole pot with the beef pieces - I add a smidgen of marmite and HP brown sauce for a slight kick and helps to give a nice rich colour.

    The pot should be sealed with foil and then covered with a heavy lid and left to simmer very gently on the stove for 90 minutes - two hours on a low heat or, preferably, in the oven at 135c or so. DO NOT PESTER IT or be tempted to break the seal. You should have a wonderfully tender, unctious dark brown stew. At this point I add mushrooms and baby shallots fried in butter and lardons of bacon and leave it on top of the stove for a final simmer of 20 mins or so.

    Works every time.
    Your mechanics have an edgy professional tone to them.
    Nice.

    I would say the meat absolutely needs to be seasoned. Salt is crucial to the treatment of the meat in the pan, pepper not so much, it can go in the pot.
    Flour helps develop the pan juices.

  21. #21
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    I like heartburn...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by charleyboy View Post
    I like heartburn...
    The acidity from a tomato base.

    Troy's lovely pie could easily be done over again without a hint of tomato.
    Might be a better product...


    [I'm not a fan of tomato-enriched foods]

  23. #23
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    Starving now after reading all that. Very comprehensive recipe post... greened Sir!!

  24. #24
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    30 years in oz and i still miss a good English pork pie with that lovely crunchie pastry !
    Anybody here know how to make it.

  25. #25
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    Is the green function gone? Nice pies.
    If people aren't into pastry. The mix could be covered with a lid of mashed potatoes.

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