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  1. #1
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    Thungsongsausage's Avatar
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    Home brew beer!!

    I am wanting to make my own beer (not for sale of course) and i was wondering if anyone has made it before here in Thailand and where to buy the ingredients?? anywhere in Bangkok?

    Cheers

  2. #2
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    filch's Avatar
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    Haven't we had a thread somewhere already on this? I know there was a recent one on whiskey, but I'm pretty sure there was one on beer too, no?

    Edit: Here we go - http://teakdoor.com/the-teakdoor-lou...er-in-los.html (Any one brew beer in los ???)

  3. #3
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    Thanks, still haven't managed to work the search engine out yet!! So basically there aren't any suppliers here in LOS and i will have to order from abroad!! Hmmmm...... will keep on trying.

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    filch's Avatar
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    I've been pondering myself whether to do this Thung. Let me know if the companies online will deliver starter kits to Thailand. The other thing that made me wonder was the temperature.

    Good luck and let me know if you have any success.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
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    Most of the equipment can be made from things available at Makro etc. More specific stuff can be bought from Ibrew in Singapore. All the ingredients are available from Ibrew as well. You will need a fridge and a temperature controller from Mashmaster in Australia for fermentation.

    With such a setup it is possible to brew a very wide range of beers of exceptional quality (if you have the skill ) I wouldn't even bother with a starter kit, but, if you insist, they are available from Ibrew in Singapore.

  6. #6
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    Cheers. Thanks for the replies. If and when i find any information i will pass it on.

  7. #7
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    Better still - invite us all around to taste the quality!

  8. #8
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    wine is a lot easier
    Menow ginger is great

  9. #9
    better looking than Ned
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    I just get the can of coopers that comes with a small packet of yeast sent from Oz. makes about 23 litres, Buy a rubbish bin wash it out in vinger mixed with water, mix the brew, seal the bin lid with tape and put a nail hole in the top, place the bin in area that stays a farly constant temp, I think 28 deg is about right and took about 5 days. under a cool kitchen table is a good place or a stair well
    Then cleaned the bottles with vinger/water and let dry, fill each bottle and add two tea spoons of normal sugar to each big bottle. I used plastic corks and taped them on with strong tape. couple of weeks later you should have good beer.
    You dont need all the other crap they try and sell you to do it.
    Also add a extra 250grams in the bin when you first mix to give it some kick and dont kill the yeast with hot water.
    Been awhile since I did one but suposse to be doing one next time home

  10. #10
    Balls to Monty
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    I found a pressure barrel to be a well worthwhile investment. You fill your glass straight from the barrel. Get the next bucket brewing while drinking draught from the tap.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rigger
    couple of weeks later you should have good beer
    Highly unlikely, you may be able to produce something which is drinkable but using that method it would be virtually impossible to produce anything properly decent. Using a kit with all the proper equipment only normally results in beer slightly better than poor.

  12. #12
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    In the land of the free its illegal to home brew, a Frenchy got busted last year for making his own fruit wine.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat
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    Was he trying to sell it? Or maybe he pissed someone off?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by madjbs
    All the ingredients are available from Ibrew as well. You will need a fridge and a temperature controller from Mashmaster in Aust

    Tried I-Brew, shipping was expensive

  15. #15
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Good luck with the project. From my Saudi experience, many made good liquor (brown or white sid), lots of folks made good to very good wine, few made good (or even drinkable) beer.

  16. #16
    better looking than Ned
    Rigger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madjbs View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Rigger
    couple of weeks later you should have good beer
    Highly unlikely, you may be able to produce something which is drinkable but using that method it would be virtually impossible to produce anything properly decent. Using a kit with all the proper equipment only normally results in beer slightly better than poor.
    I like the taste of home brew and here to tell you it is possible the only thing that is different than the kit is no air trap. Decent home brew is better than Thai beer. The last one I did using the method above was a hit with my pommie mates and the locals.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by filch
    Let me know if the companies online will deliver starter kits to Thailand.
    They do.

    I have ordered all the kit from here (The Country Brewer - More Than Just A Home Brew Store!) with no problems, except them thinking Coopers is a good beer.

  18. #18
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    If you really have to use a kit then the following is the least you should do to ensure a decent end result.

    -Throw away the yeast which comes in the kit and use a separate decent dry yeast. SAFale yeasts are good.

    -Make sure everything is sanitized but don't use vinegar, instead use a bleach and water mix (make sure you rinse well) or an iodine and water solution.

    -For a fermentation bucket buy a 20l plastic water container from Makro, make an air lock by drilling a hole in the lid and sticking in a tube which runs out with the end submerged in a bottle of water.

    -The fermentation should take place at about 22c, 24 at a push. Leave to ferment for 2 weeks minimum and then bottle with a small amount of sugar. Leave the bottles for 3 weeks in a place no warmer than 24c and drink.

    Basically the same as Riggers method, but, by doing this there will be much less chance of off flavours developing due to infections etc.. In Thailand ants and other creatures are bound to find a way in to the beer if you don't use an airlock.

  19. #19
    The Pikey Hunter
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    ^^ I particularly liked their yoghurt maker:

    Made in France (Keep the unit in a quiet spot otherwise it may get scared and surrender)


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by madjbs
    -Make sure everything is sanitized but don't use vinegar, instead use a bleach and water mix (make sure you rinse well) or an iodine and water solution.
    I use the stuff to clean baby bottles. It doesn't leave an odour like bleach does.

    Quote Originally Posted by madjbs
    -The fermentation should take place at about 22c, 24 at a push. Leave to ferment for 2 weeks minimum and then bottle with a small amount of sugar. Leave the bottles for 3 weeks in a place no warmer than 24c and drink
    I use 21 Deg.

  21. #21
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    Normally the yeast produces enough heat to raise the beer temp by a few degrees, so it always is good to ferment at 20-22 degree air temp. Only really possible if you use a fridge though.

    Starsan is the best sanitizer, a bottle will make hundreds of litres of solution and it's no rinse, no flavour.

  22. #22
    better looking than Ned
    Rigger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madjbs
    Basically the same as Riggers method, but, by doing this there will be much less chance of off flavours developing due to infections etc.. In Thailand ants and other creatures are bound to find a way in to the beer if you don't use an airlock.
    Maybe thats why my beer gave a everyone really trippy dreams

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat nedwalk's Avatar
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    i been doing home brew for about 10 years now, some good clues here IMO, air locks are a must, good yeast, cool temps 22-24, and steraliseing, i use sodium bi and sunlight, fuck bottles, once the fermantation is over, i drain into another 20 litre plassy, and put another brew down straight away, i went out and bought 3 x 18ltr stainless kegs, the kind that bars use for their lolly water, so from there i siphon from the plassies into the kegs, and then gas the kegs whence they are chilled, at any given time i can have over a hundred litrs of beer..i had an old chest freezer converted with a new thermostat to take me kegs and plassys, ive seen blokes with there kegs in old fridges and taps through the doors, i use a gun..i like beer!!

    ignore marmite's comment he knows fuck all about good beer!

  24. #24
    I am in Jail
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    I've brewed many a batch of good ale.

    Brewing a good ale is fairly simple, but you do need to pay very close attention to certain details to achieve consistently good results.

    I would think the logistics of getting the materials here would be the hardest part.
    I brewed a bunch in a bush village in AK where it was illegal to brew. Everything had to be flown in discreetly from Anchorage.

    I'd buy 50lbs bag of extra light DME (dry malt extract) This is good for about 8-9 six gallon batches.
    You use 6-7 pounds of malt per batch.
    For each batch you also need a pound of cracked grain, 1/2 pound carapils and 1/2 pound crystal.
    Boiling hops and finishing hops. I used the pellet hops because it was easier.
    2ozs of cascade and 2ozs of Saaz was a good combo.
    And of course the Coopers ale yeast which delivers consistently good results also.

    I found the key to a good tasting batch was the grain "sparging" process. This is where you brew something like a tea with the cracked grain. I would use muslin bags to make it easy to remove the grain from the wort.
    You need to be extra careful not to boil the water during the sparging process, your water temp should be no more than 178 degrees. A good thermometer is an important part of your equipment.
    Sparging takes about an hour. You just let the grain steep making sure it doesn't get too hot. If the grain get too hot it releases tannins from the grain husk which cause the yeast to mutate which results in weird/nasty tasting brews.

    Remove the grain, bring the wort up to a boil add the DME and then the boiling hops. Boil for an hour, add the finishing hops for the last 15 minutes. Remove the hops.
    (I'd use small muslin bags to handle the hops too)

    let it all cool, pitch the yeast and put it in your fermentor (20 liter glass water bottle would work fine, plastic works too just harder to clean up after)
    rig some kind of air-lock
    You want the batch to ferment at 68-72 degrees.
    In the hot summers in AK I'd use an evaporative cooling method to keep the batch cool.
    Set the fermentor in a large dish of water, wrap the fermentor with a large towel so it soaks up the water. Then just have a fan blow air over it. That works very well.
    In about a week the fermentation process will be complete. I'd usually go 10-14 days to assure a complete fermentation.
    You then "rack" the batch into another container from which you will bottle.
    Boil up a quart of water and add 1 pound of dextrose and 1/2 pound DME to prime the batch for bottling. The 1/2 pound of DME is a trick I learned which speeds up the process and you can drink your beer sooner.
    It's ready to drink after 2-3 weeks, optimum time for bottle aging is about 60 days.
    I'd plan my batches accordingly. I'd have 2-4 batches going at any one time.
    I made a lot of good ale this way, as good as any of the fancy microbrews out there.

    Charlie Papazian's book "the Complete Joy of Homebrewing" is the best reference book out there.
    If you're serious about homebrewing it's a must have.
    I followed his stout recipe once and made the best stout I've ever drank.
    Last edited by Mr Earl; 04-03-2010 at 08:10 AM.

  25. #25
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    filch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    They do.

    I have ordered all the kit from here (The Country Brewer - More Than Just A Home Brew Store!) with no problems, except them thinking Coopers is a good beer.
    Cheers for that MtD. Their prices are much more reasonable - not checked out the shipping costs yet.

    What kit did you buy and what beer? What was the total cost for your first batch?
    Last edited by filch; 04-03-2010 at 12:22 PM.

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