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Thread: Important?

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    Important?

    My friend came home from the temple with a piece of ordinary white string which she tied on my wrist, what's it mean please?

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    All your money , is her money now,

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    You are her ATM. How sweet!

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    Its a curse. Go pay the local shaman to have it lifted.

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    I think its a Hindu/Buddhist tradition. The strings are blessed with good wishes from whoever tied it I think. I'm sure someone can give a more accurate explanation.

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    Her love comes with strings attached

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    The white string is called Sai Sin. In Thai popular religion an individual has a number of souls, I can't recall how many but I think it's about 40. These souls are called "kwan" (hence the romantic (and sadly almost defunct, seen only in poetry) phrase Mia Kwan, wife of my soul)). Thais believe that these souls can leave the body, causing illness or death, and that the white thread, symbolically, and the words spoken, in reality, bind those souls tightly to your body. The ceremony of tying Sai Sin around a persons body, (the full ceremony is normally only done just after birth and during a life threatening illness), is called Tam Kwan. Tying the white string around your wrist is the everyday form of Tam Kwan, it's a ritual done for your well-being and your health, binding your soul tightly to your body. It's a nice thing for somebody to do for you. Pay no attention to the clueless comments you've received on this thread, Tam Kwan is a compliment, Thais take it seriously.
    The Above Post May Contain Strong Language, Flashing Lights, or Violent Scenes.

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    I went to a temple in Koh Samui and was given { well for a 100bt donation}
    one of these . As the Monk tied it he said "luck to you, luck to you".
    Still haven't that lottery win tho! Thanks for your post Dr B0b v interesting I always
    like to learn something new.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    The white string is called Sai Sin. In Thai popular religion an individual has a number of souls, I can't recall how many but I think it's about 40. These souls are called "kwan" (hence the romantic (and sadly almost defunct, seen only in poetry) phrase Mia Kwan, wife of my soul)). Thais believe that these souls can leave the body, causing illness or death, and that the white thread, symbolically, and the words spoken, in reality, bind those souls tightly to your body. The ceremony of tying Sai Sin around a persons body, (the full ceremony is normally only done just after birth and during a life threatening illness), is called Tam Kwan. Tying the white string around your wrist is the everyday form of Tam Kwan, it's a ritual done for your well-being and your health, binding your soul tightly to your body. It's a nice thing for somebody to do for you. Pay no attention to the clueless comments you've received on this thread, Tam Kwan is a compliment, Thais take it seriously.
    Interesting, thank you.

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    What do you have to do to get an amulet then?

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    What do you have to do to get an amulet then?
    Buy it or make friends with somebody who will give you one. If you buy one always ask "pluk sek mote, mai?". If the pluk sek is not mote your amulet won't work. Check out this totally awesome post, TeakDoor.com - The Thailand Forum Charms_and_Magic_in_Thailand

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    The white string is called Sai Sin. In Thai popular religion an individual has a number of souls, I can't recall how many but I think it's about 40. These souls are called "kwan" (hence the romantic (and sadly almost defunct, seen only in poetry) phrase Mia Kwan, wife of my soul)). Thais believe that these souls can leave the body, causing illness or death, and that the white thread, symbolically, and the words spoken, in reality, bind those souls tightly to your body. The ceremony of tying Sai Sin around a persons body, (the full ceremony is normally only done just after birth and during a life threatening illness), is called Tam Kwan. Tying the white string around your wrist is the everyday form of Tam Kwan, it's a ritual done for your well-being and your health, binding your soul tightly to your body. It's a nice thing for somebody to do for you. Pay no attention to the clueless comments you've received on this thread, Tam Kwan is a compliment, Thais take it seriously.
    Nice call and explanation, Booby.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    The white string is called Sai Sin. In Thai popular religion an individual has a number of souls, I can't recall how many but I think it's about 40. These souls are called "kwan" (hence the romantic (and sadly almost defunct, seen only in poetry) phrase Mia Kwan, wife of my soul)). Thais believe that these souls can leave the body, causing illness or death, and that the white thread, symbolically, and the words spoken, in reality, bind those souls tightly to your body. The ceremony of tying Sai Sin around a persons body, (the full ceremony is normally only done just after birth and during a life threatening illness), is called Tam Kwan. Tying the white string around your wrist is the everyday form of Tam Kwan, it's a ritual done for your well-being and your health, binding your soul tightly to your body. It's a nice thing for somebody to do for you. Pay no attention to the clueless comments you've received on this thread, Tam Kwan is a compliment, Thais take it seriously.
    Yes Dr.Bob, and I am very respectful to the Buddhist traditions, but many Thai girls use the Sai Sin like they use a hickey or a wedding ring, to say this man is taken. I've folded mine and placed it in my wallet.

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    ^It's not Buddhist so your respect is wasted. Also, get out and meet some decent Thais. Tam Kwan should only be done by monks or by people older than you. I have never known anybody nor heard of anybody who's received Sai Sin from a "girl". That's just bizarre.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    ^It's not Buddhist so your respect is wasted. Also, get out and meet some decent Thais. Tam Kwan should only be done by monks or by people older than you. I have never known anybody nor heard of anybody who's received Sai Sin from a "girl". That's just bizarre.
    Sounds right,my wife always takes me to the temple, and the monk puts one around my wrist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    ^It's not Buddhist so your respect is wasted. Also, get out and meet some decent Thais. Tam Kwan should only be done by monks or by people older than you. I have never known anybody nor heard of anybody who's received Sai Sin from a "girl". That's just bizarre.
    I only get them from the Village elders, aunties, MIL, Papa and sometimes from great great grandma when she is able to get around.

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    ^
    Me too. Ive had an orange one from a monk before. Does that signify something different?

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    ^ he ran out of white string?

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    what a shit load of people with nothing else too say or do

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    The orange one means that you are a Blackpool supporter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by navynine View Post
    what a shit load of people with nothing else too say or do

    Says the man posting on Teakdoor at 4AM

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    it is nothing more than a visible sign, a receipt, a marker to the monks and other moneygrabbers that lurk around temples that you have already contributed to their fund for a yet another gold plated kitsch ornament to join all the other kitsch ornaments and need not be pestered again for the duration of your visit to that particular temple.

    during a recent visit to a temple up near nong khai i was greeted at the entrance by an electronic monk, like a ronald macdonald or colonel saunders, with flashing eyes and a coin slot, 5 baht got you a recorded blessing and some las vegas karaoke lights for 10 seconds.

    trashtastic !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile
    an electronic monk, like a ronald macdonald or colonel saunders, with flashing eyes and a coin slot, 5 baht got you a recorded blessing and some las vegas karaoke lights for 10 seconds.
    I WANT ONE!!!

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    A simple observation from a farang. The string is a blessing; often offered when someone “tam bun” (which I spell tamboon) There is a context where it can be “better to give than to receive”, so, accepting them graciously is considered polite. As for the “luck” chohk dee – I’m not sure that really translates completely into English. I suspect Thai or perhaps even Asian luck is a bit more than the word implies in the West.

    I’ll bite my tough on the rest. I want to avoid polotics when ever posible.

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    A well meaning tradition, no matter what people say. Dr. Bob gave a good description, but I see this all the time in the village when someone comes to visit and is for luck and health. Not the kind of luck to win the lottery, but the opposite of bad luck in the ways of life. I have also seen this done during an engagement ceremony where the villagers tie them on the wrists of the couple to be wed. Also, done at weddings to show respect and with the best wishes to the married couple. I tied one on my son after he was born, which is an expected thing to do.
    If a female does this for you, accept it as a sign she wishes you good health and hopes only good things will happen to you. Don't read too deep into the meaning.

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