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  1. #1
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    Chittychangchang's Avatar
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    Yi Peng Festival fills sky with light

    A spectacular scene unfolds every year at the Yi Peng Festival in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand, when thousands of candle-lit paper lanterns are released into the sky and Ping River ahead of Loy Krathong, the festival of lights.
    The festival is held on the full moon of the Thai calendar's 12th lunar month (usually mid-November). This is when locals "believe the rivers are filled to their fullest and the moon is at its brightest – the perfect time to ‘make merit’ and ... make a wish for good fortune in the new year," according to
    Bangkok.com.

    Monks release paper lanterns at the Phan Tao temple during the Yi Peng Festival in Thailand. (Photo: nuwatphoto/Shutterstock)
    Releasing the Lanna-style lanterns and krathongs "symbolizes letting go of all ills and misfortunes in the previous year," Bangkok.com reports. And much like blowing out candles on a birthday cake, Buddhists believe if you make a wish when you let go of the lantern, the wish will come true in the new year.


    Crowds prepare to release floating lanterns into the sky in Chiang Mai, Thailand, during the Yi Peng Festival. (Photo: Tanachot Srijam/Shutterstock)
    The Yi Peng Festival (also written as Yee Ping), which honors Buddha, is a big to-do in Chiang Mai. Over the course of a weekend, there are traditional dance shows, live music, an official parade, fireworks and craft sessions. Residents hang colorful lanterns and flag decorations in their homes and around public places.
    The festival originated in the ancient Lanna Kingdom (now northern Thailand) hundreds of years ago, and Chiang Mai was the capital.


    Yi Peng Festival is held on the full moon of the 12th lunar month of the Thai calendar, which is November. (Photo: PanatFoto/Shutterstock)
    Several thousand people gather at Mae Jo University for the biggest mass release of lanterns, but there are some rules. You must buy a ticket in advance, for starters. Attendees must wear respectable clothing with long pants and no bare shoulders; white shirts are preferred. There is no alcohol allowed, and you must buy your lanterns on-site. They reportedly cost about 50 cents each, but they can become scarce as the evening progresses.

    Colorful paper lanterns hang at the festival. (Photo: aiaikawa/Shutterstock)
    Locals and the tourists who flock to the area enjoy beautiful weather for the festival, as this time of year marks the end of the rainy season and the beginning of winter, which means cool mornings and evenings but temperatures in the 80s during the day.

    Locals release candle-lit paper lanterns into the sky and river. (Photo: Vasin Lee/Shutterstock)
    Monks play an important role in the Yi Peng Festival, as people go to temples to listen to them pray and meditate with them.
    About a week after the traditional festival, there's an "extra" ceremony for tourists who buy tickets (usually for about $100) to attend. It includes the lanterns for lighting, a ceremony, a full meal and great photo opportunities.

    Locals believe this is the perfect time to forgive and seek forgiveness, and to make a wish for good fortune in the new year. (Photo: John Shedrick/flickr)

  2. #2
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    DrB0b's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Locals believe this is the perfect time to forgive and seek forgiveness
    Or, put another way, to get utterly hammered, gorge themselves sick, and throw fireworks in the lower kiloton range.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Will check today and find out when they will release lanterns.

    Loy Krathong is very early this year. Starts on November 3.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    The lantern release is on November 3rd.

    It’s just a couple of kilometers away from my house so easy to see from here. Thankfully, no one in town this year forcing me to go to that colossal fracas again.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    The lantern release is on November 3rd.

    It’s just a couple of kilometers away from my house so easy to see from here. Thankfully, no one in town this year forcing me to go to that colossal fracas again.

    Is it really that bad? I kinda toyed with the idea of going down for a look for the first time but I'm not too good with huge crowds, drunk or sober - me or them.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^Yes. Very crowded and you have to walk quite far from the university parking to the temple. Shoulder to shoulder people playing with fire when you get there.


    According to the Tourism Authority of Thailand, lanterns are only allowed to be released on November 3rd from 7pm to 1am the next morning. Smoke lanterns are allowed to be released from 10am until noon November 3rd.

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Don’t know how to get this map in English, but at least the highway numbers are there.

    Mae Jo University is highlighted at the bottom and the (Dhamakaya) temple is pinned.

    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by crackerjack101 View Post
    Is it really that bad? I kinda toyed with the idea of going down for a look for the first time but I'm not too good with huge crowds, drunk or sober - me or them.
    Down by the river near the old railway bridge is the place for loy krathong. Rent a mat and buy beer from vendors. Still chaos though, always makes me think of the Somme. I don't really know anyone who bothers with the Mae Jo rigmarole. I find its best enjoyed from a balcony about two miles away.
    don't you know there ain't no devil, there's just god when he's drunk

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Don’t know how to get this map in English, but at least the highway numbers are there.

    Mae Jo University is highlighted at the bottom and the (Dhamakaya) temple is pinned.

    That's up a narrow road in the middle of nowhere. I was there a few days back dropping someone off for the King's funeral deal. Not walking distance from the main road, no taxis and no street lights.

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