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Thailands Festivals and Celebrations Thailand's Festivals and Celebrations From the wet & wild Thai New Year known as SongKran, or the Pattaya Ladyboy Festivals, to the more traditional annual Thai festivals of Loy Krathong, Chakri Day, Coronation Day, FireBalls in Nongkhai, rocket festivals in Isaan to the Buffalo races in Chonburi and the Elephant round up in Surin. From local Wat festivals to national celebrations, all you experiences with Thailand holidays, ceremonies, festivals and annual events can be found here. Been to a Thai Wedding, Funeral or other Buddhist ceremony? Let us see. Your photos, youtube videos and comments are welcomed., FireBalls in Nongkhai, rocket festivals in Isaan to the Buffalo races in Chonburi and the

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Old 10-05-2007, 02:14 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Royal Ploughing Ceremony - Sacred Cows' choice of eating

Feast or famine in ancient rite

All eyes are on what Sacred Cows choose to eat at the Royal Ploughing Ceremony



So what will a pair of Sacred Cows eat today? We shall know the prophecy right after the Royal Ploughing Ceremony: whether the land will be fertile this year, whether the water will be abundant or whether the farmers' harvests will yield a rich output.

The prophecy all depends on the Sacred Cows' choice of eating, which will provide a forecast for the country's harvest for the whole year. During the ceremony, held at Sanam Luang, right beside the Royal Grand Palace, the chief Brahmin will prepare a menu of seven items - rice paddy, maize, green bean, sesame, hard liquor, water and grass - for the Sacred Cows.

The annual ceremony is an ancient ritual, a mixture of Bud-dhist and Brahmin rituals. It is observed and practised not only in Thailand but also in other Asian nations whose livelihoods have been dependent on rice harvests.

The name of Suthothana, the father of Lord Buddha, is translated as "white rice", implying that his family line was involved in rice farming. Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn has been seen harvesting rice once in a while in experimental plantations. The Emperor of Japan is also involved in sacred rice plantations. Cambodia has recently conducted a similar royal ploughing ceremony.

If the Sacred Cows eat paddy or maize, the prophecy is that the harvests and food produce will be abundant. If they eat green bean or sesame, food produce will be abundant and the food that we eat every day will also be available throughout the country. If they drink water or eat grass, water will be abundant, while harvests, food produce and the food that we eat every day will be rich in supply. If they drink the liquor, transportation will be convenient and commerce with foreign countries will be prosperous.

But the prophecy will also have to take into account the praying and random choice of three pieces of cloth of different lengths.

If the Ploughing Lord picks a piece of cloth measuring four palm spans, there will be more water. Farming on high land will bear good yields, while farming on low land might face some damage.

If the Ploughing Lord chooses a piece of cloth measuring five palms, the prophecy is that water supply will be just about right, rice plantations will yield good output and food produce will also be abundant.

If the Ploughing Lord selects a piece of cloth measuring six palms, water will be scarce. Farming on low land will bear good yields, but farming on high land will not bring good results.

This year, the pair of Sacred Cows, named Prakho Therd and Phrakho Thoon, will take part in the ceremony from 8.19am until 8.59am. His Royal Highness Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn is presiding over the ceremony and the Rice Grains Blessing.

The grains blessing was held yesterday in a Buddhist-style religious ceremony at the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. Yesterday was also recognised as Agriculturists' Day. The ploughing ceremony is conducted with Brahmin-style ritual. In Thailand, Buddhist and Brahmin rituals are most of the time inseparable.

A rehearsal for the ceremony was held last Sunday. Banphot Hongthong, permanent secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives, acted as Ploughing Lord with angels holding gold and silver baskets accompanying him, while he ploughed the land and sowed the seeds. The rehearsal went well, assuring that the grand ceremony today will be held with success and in colourful fanfare.

The grains blessing and ploughing ceremony are held every year in May. As Thailand, or Old Siam, depends for its livelihood on rice, the ploughing ceremony signals an auspicious start to a new harvest season. It also boosts the morale of farmers so that they have confidence in their farming and planting for the rest of the year.

The ploughing ceremony had been held since ancient times until 1936, shortly after the bloodless revolution of 1932. It was not until 1960 that the ceremony was revived to honour farmers and to recognise their contribution to the well-being of the country.

As Banphot will act as the Ploughing Lord, his deputy Suthiporn Jiraphand will be responsible for making the prophecy after the completion of the ceremony. The rice seeds and grains used in this year's ceremony weigh 2,011 kilograms. They come from the experimental project at Chitralada Palace.

At the end of the ceremony, the Thai public will storm the grounds of Sanam Luang to bring home the grains to augment the auspices for their lives.
In addition, the Ministry of Agriculture will prepare royal-sponsored seeds in 10,300 packages for free distribution to farmers nationwide.

The Nation
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:54 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Old 10-05-2007, 02:29 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Sacred Cows predict abundant harvests

Thailand can expect bountiful harvest

(BangkokPost.com) - The annual ploughing ceremony on Thursday morning apparently showed that Thailand can expect a bountiful harvest this year.

His Royal Highness Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn presided over the Brahman ceremony, designed to give an auspicious beginning to the new planting season. It is held each year at the Sanam Luang grounds.

During the ceremony, the sacred oxen as always were given a choice of three lengths of clothes for selection. The bull chose the medium length clothes, indicating that there would be average rain in the upcoming season.

The bulls also chose to eat rice grains, corns and grass, which supposedly means that food production will be plentiful this crop year, while water would be abundant.

The oxen had to choose from among seven types of nourishment, including alcohol and sesame seeds, all of which signify different things.

The ceremony was broadcast live on national television.



Sacred Cows predict abundant harvests


The Sacred Cows used in the Royal Ploughing Ceremony Thursday predicted that Thailand's harvests and foods produce as well as water would be abundant.

During the ceremony, the Sacre Cows ate paddy and maize, giving a prophecy that the harvests and food produce would be abundant.

The cows also ate grass, which predicted that water would be abundant while food supply would be rich.

The Nation

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Old 10-05-2007, 02:32 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Feast or famine in ancient rite

Feast or famine in ancient rite


All eyes are on what Sacred Cows choose to eat at the Royal Ploughing CeremonyFeast or famine in ancient riten


So what will a pair of Sacred Cows eat today? We shall know the prophecy right after the Royal Ploughing Ceremony: whether the land will be fertile this year, whether the water will be abunฌdant or whether the farmers' harฌvests will yield a rich output.
The prophecy all depends on the Sacred Cows' choice of eating, which will provide a forecast for the country's harvest for the whole year. During the ceremony, held at Sanam Luang, right beside the Royal Grand Palace, the chief Brahmin will prepare a menu of seven items - rice paddy, maize, green bean, sesame, hard liquor, water and grass - for the Sacred Cows.

The annual ceremony is an ancient ritual, a mixture of Buddhist and Brahmin rituals. It is observed and practised not only in Thailand but also in other Asian nations whose livelihoods have been dependent on rice harvests.

The name of Suthothana, the father of Lord Buddha, is translatฌed as "white rice", implying that his family line was involved in rice farming. Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn has been seen harvesting rice once in a while in experimental plantaฌtions. The Emperor of Japan is also involved in sacred rice planฌtations. Cambodia has recently conducted a similar royal ploughฌing ceremony.

If the Sacred Cows eat paddy or maize, the prophecy is that the harvests and food produce will be abundant. If they eat green bean or sesame, food produce will be abundant and the food that we eat every day will also be available throughout the country. If they drink water or eat grass, water will be abundant, while harvests, food produce and the food that we eat every day will be rich in supply. If they drink the liquor, transportaฌtion will be convenient and comฌmerce with foreign countries will be prosperous.

But the prophecy will also have to take into account the praying and random choice of three pieces of cloth of different lengths.
If the Ploughing Lord picks a piece of cloth measuring four palm spans, there will be more water. Farming on high land will bear good yields, while farming on low land might face some damage.

If the Ploughing Lord chooses a piece of cloth measuring five palms, the prophecy is that water supply will be just about right, rice plantations will yield good output and food produce will also be abundant.

If the Ploughing Lord selects a piece of cloth measuring six palms, water will be scarce. Farming on low land will bear good yields, but farming on high land will not bring good results.

This year, the pair of Sacred Cows, named Prakho Therd and Phrakho Thoon, will take part in the ceremony from 8.19am until 8.59am. His Royal Highness Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn is presiding over the ceremony and the Rice Grains Blessing.

The grains blessing was held yesterday in a Buddhiststyle religious ceremony at the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. Yesterday was also recognised as Agriculturists' Day. The ploughing ceremony is conducted with Brahminstyle ritual. In Thailand, Buddhist and Brahmin rituals are most of the time inseparable.

A rehearsal for the ceremony was held last Sunday. Banphot Hongthong, permanent secretary at the Ministry of Agriculture and Agricultural Cooperatives, acted as Ploughing Lord with angels holding gold and silver baskets accompanying him, while he ploughed the land and sowed the seeds. The rehearsal went well, assuring that the grand ceremony today will be held with success and in colourful fanfare.

The grains blessing and ploughing ceremony are held every year in May. As Thailand, or Old Siam, depends for its livelihood on rice, the ploughing ceremony signals an auspicious start to a new harvest season. It also boosts the morale of farmers so that they have confidence in their farming and planting for the rest of the year.

The ploughing ceremony had been held since ancient times until 1936, shortly after the bloodless revolution of 1932. It was not until 1960 that the ceremony was revived to honour farmers and to recognise their contribution to the wellbeing of the country.

As Banphot will act as the Ploughing Lord, his deputy Suthiporn Jiraphand will be responsible for making the prophecy after the completion of the ceremony. The rice seeds and grains used in this year's ceremony weigh 2,011 kilograms. They come from the experimental project at Chitralada Palace.

At the end of the ceremony, the Thai public will storm the grounds of Sanam Luang to bring home the grains to augment the auspices for their lives.

In addition, the Ministry of Agriculture will prepare royalsponsored seeds in 10,300 packages for free distribution to farmers nationwide.


Royal ploughing ceremony in Asia

The Nation
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Old 10-05-2007, 04:53 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Amazing what folks will choose to believe.
 
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Old 11-05-2007, 01:08 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Grain, livestock, water in abundance

Grain, livestock, water in abundance
Agriculture permanent secretary Banphot Hongthong, acting as Lord of the Ploughing Ceremony, scatters rice seeds at the close of the annual ceremony to usher in the rice-planting season. During the ceremony at Sanam Luang yesterday morning, the sacred oxen, Therd and Thun, chose rice, maize and grass to eat from among the various food offerings. As a result, the court astrologer predicted there will be crops, grain and livestock in abundance this year, as well as sufficient water for farming. The ceremony was presided over by His Royal Highness Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn.

Bangkok Post
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Old 11-05-2007, 01:51 PM   #7 (permalink)
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A nation led by astrologers & fortune-tellers - at each & every level. Welcome to the 21-st century.
 
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Old 13-05-2011, 07:53 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Good harvest, abundant food predicted
13/05/2011

Bountiful rice yields, an abundance of food and a fair amount of water were predicted for the coming crop year by soothsayers at the Royal Ploughing Ceremony at Sanam Luang on Friday.

The ancient ceremony, which has been performed since the Sukhothai period some 700 years ago, was held this morning to mark the beginning of the traditional rice planting season and boost the morale of farmers.

On behalf of His Majesty the King, HRH Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn presided over the ceremony, accompanied by His Royal Consort HRH Princess Srirasmi, and HRH Princess Bajrakitiyabha.

Two sacred white oxen, named Phra Ko Fah and Phra Ko Sai, were taken to plough the ceremonial ground at Sanam Luang, herded by agriculture and cooperatives permanent secretary Chalermporn Pirunsarn.


Two sacred white oxen, named Phra Ko Fah and Phra Ko Sai, at this year's Royal Ploughing Ceremony eat grass and drink liquior, forecasting plentiful food and prosperous economy.
(Photo by Chanat Katanyu)

Dressed as a Brahmin god, Mr Chalermporn served in the ceremony as Lord of the Plough, or Phraya Raek Na.

Mr Chalermpol's choice of a piece of cloth led to a prediction that there would be a fair amount of water, bountiful rice yields and an abundance of food.

The oxen were each then offered seven bowls of food and their choices were used to make predictions.

The seven bowls held grass, paddy, maize, sesame seeds, soy bean, water and liquor.

The oxen ate grass, an omen that the country would enjoy an average water supply, plentiful rice harvests and an abundance of fruits and staple foods this year.

The oxen also drank liquor, indicating that communications would be convenient, foreign trade would flourish and the economy would prosper.

At the ceremony, rewards were presented to outstanding farmers, agricultural organisations, cooperatives and agricultural scholars.

Crowds of people rushed to collect rice seeds scattered on the field by the Lord of the Plough during the ceremony. The seeds are believed to bring fortune, happiness and abundance.

bangkokpost.com
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Old 14-05-2011, 06:33 AM   #9 (permalink)
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following is from the blogworld .................

Ploughing Day
May 13, 2011


Above: "A PLOUGHING FESTIVAL IN SIAM" BY HARRY HILLMAN, Published London, 1898.

"…illustrated account of this Siamese ceremony, which took place at the residence of Phya Surisak, the High Priest of Agriculture, when no farming will commence until the year is foretold by astrology and the results of the ceremonial ploughing."

Ploughing Day – May 13, 2011

Today is Ploughing Day. This ancient Brahmin rite has been celebrated in many ways in Thailand over the years with Buddhist elements added in the Rama IV era. The modern one-day version of the ceremony (and reintroduction of the ploughing itself) dates from the 1960s.

The actions of the oxen pulling the plough are said to foretell a good or bad growing season. In recent times large crowds gather at Sanam Luang to witness the event and collect the seeds used in the ceremony.



Above and below:
More photos from the ploughing ceremony in the late 19th century





(Source: Undated postcard)

Above and below:
Postcards showing the ceremony in the past – The location of the scene below is "Dusit Park"



(Source: Undated postcard)




(Source: Undated postcard)

2bangkok.com
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Old 18-05-2011, 04:29 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Yeah. Got reminded of this yesterday when I visited, or, attempted to visit the Thai Consulate in my city yesterday. It was closed due to "Make a Bucka Day" holiday. Luckily our bottle shops weren't closed, nor were the public houses.
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