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  1. #1
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    Pattaya Celebrates Maka Buscha Day

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    Monday 4th March 2007
    Pattaya celebrates Maka Buscha Day.
    On Saturday, Pattaya along with the rest of Thailand celebrated Maka Buscha which takes place on the full moon day of the 3rd lunar Month. This day is a religious public holiday. It came from the day when 1,250 disciples from the Lord Buddha gathered to listen to the Dharma speech after Buddha's enlightenment. Merit making ceremonies take place at temples, while at night candlelit processions walk three times around the temple known in Thai as “Vientien”, one time for the Lord Buddha, one time for the Sangha or Buddhist monk community and one time for the Dharma which are the Buddhist teachings. We attended the Chaimongkon Temple on the South Pattaya Road to witness this spiritual ceremony and similar to previous years, the high attendance demonstrated the importance of this religious holiday and the respect held by both Thai’s and foreigners towards the Buddhist religion here in Pattaya.


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  2. #2
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    Where's the beer, or don't they celebrate like we do in Korat?

  3. #3
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    Traditional candle procession marks Makha Bucha Day

    Traditional candle procession marks Makha Bucha Day
    Vimolrat Singnikorn
    Pattaya’s temples were the setting on March 3 for the traditional Makha Bucha Day candle procession, with residents and their children walking with lit candles around the main temples such as Chaimongkol, Sawangfapruetaram, Photisampan, Boonkanjanaram and Nongyai.

    During the morning there had been offerings of food to the monks, considered to be especially auspicious for entire families at this time of year, and many people prayed and meditated.
    In the evening, people returned to the temples bringing flowers, candles and incense, and walked around the outside of the temples three times (performing “wien thien” ceremony). Afterwards they listened to monks preach the Dharma, or teachings of the Buddha, and received blessings from them.

    This important occasion for Buddhists marks the first sermon of the Lord Buddha to 1250 monks, and commemorates the miraculous event when 1,250 disciples of the Buddha, Gautama Sakayamuni, traveled to meet with the Buddha with no prearranged agreement, at Weluwan Mahawiharn Temple in the area of Rachakhryha, India.
    Worshipping or ‘Bucha’ occurs on the 15th Day of the waning moon of the third lunar month, or ‘Makha’.

    The day gained official recognition in Thailand during the reign of King Rama IV and became a nationally observed day with all government institutions closing down and observing the rituals associated with Buddhist commandments.
    Devout followers participate in morning ceremonies, making merit and listening to sermons at local temples, and later in the evening return to the temple to perform the “wien thien ceremony” - walking three circuits around sacred grounds, paying homage to the “Triple Gem” or the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha. The day is observed all over Thailand.

    Other countries where the Buddhist faith is predominant and where Makha Bucha Day is officially observed as a national day include Nepal, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Sri Lanka and India. Other countries with populations observing the day but in limited numbers include China, Korea and Vietnam.
    Disseminating the Buddha’s teachings and the journey to meet with the Buddha on the 15th night of the 3rd lunar month are part of the historical events that include the sermons and truths spoken by the Buddha.
    Having good intentions, not harming others, avoiding evil actions and making the heart and mind pure in thought were among the truths spoken by the Buddha. Additionally, other truths spoken by the Buddha cautioned individual restraint in all that attracts one’s attention, to include desiring possessions belonging to others, and exploiting others for personal gain.
    Before departing, the Buddha also referred to the people’s interest in making merit, gaining self-esteem and a comfortable reassurance that moral integrity exists. More importantly, having faith in the “Triple Gem” (Phraratanatrai) was illustrated by emphasizing the importance of avoiding drunken, irresponsible and immoral behavior, and maintaining focus on supporting loved ones while being content in one’s existence with friends and without selfish greed.

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