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  1. #1
    Newbie Hoof Hearted's Avatar
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    Wanted: Ghost Stories, Myths and Legends

    not sure if this is the right area for this thread, feel free to move it.

    I am looking for local Thai, Asean, or Asian ghost stories and tales. If anyone knows any, I am interested in them. Also interested in Myths and Legends. Post or Mesg. or throw in a link if you have one ! Thanks in advance, i enjoy the reading.

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    Thailand Expat baby maker's Avatar
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    Get on to Socal....he can spin a yarn...fantasy and plagiarism...
    Butterfly....is a pretty mean critic....

    but setting aside those two iconic identites...

    your thread promises to be interesting...
    as long as you don't get too much content, such as this post..

    best of luck with it...i look forward to it....
    Last edited by baby maker; 11-10-2011 at 04:13 PM.
    i am just the nowhere man...
    living in the nowhere land...
    forever...

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat phunphin's Avatar
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    Good subject , given the thai obsession with ghost stories,.also are there any Ghost hunters/paranormal societies in Thailand..(i will google, i promise).

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    Check out the stories of Sun-ton-poo. There is a memorial to him in Laem Mae Pim in Rayong province and the images from his stories you will see in many places around Thailand.

    He has been described as the "William Shakespeare of Thailand".

    Its best if you get a Thai to tell you the complete story - so far I have been unable to find it anywhere online in English language.

  5. #5
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    this one is near me.

    Nang Nak

    Nang (นาง) is a title in Thai given to a married lady, just as Mrs is in the western world. Although perhaps not necessarily married in the legal sense of the word, its also attained through a prolonged relationship such as a common law wife or husband. Nang Nak (นางนาค) or Mae Nak (mother Nak แม่นาค) is probably the most famous of all Thai ghost stories and supposedly based on historical fact, is one that most Thais have a profound affiliation with. I saw the 1998 movie portrayal in a Bangkok cinema and found the film both engrossing and touching.

    The story is set in Phra Khanong in the late 1800’s. Rather than the bustling Sukhumvit suburb that it is today, it was then quiet rural tropical jungle with the river (khlong) being the fundamental conduit for life. Food, travel and irrigation was essentially provided by the khlong and alongside it sat the traditional Thai stilt house that was the house of Nak and her doting lover Mak. The two lived a peaceful and natural existence with Mak providing for his wife through fishing, foraging and farming. This was until he was drafted to fight for his country in a war. As his friend paddled up the river to collect him, Mak departed sorrowfully from his pregnant love.

    As the war ravaged and Mak fought bravely to protect his country, his wife went into labour and the local womenfolk assisted in the childbirth. However both Nak and her unborn child died during the process and the womenfolk buried them both and took the possessions from the house, including the ring that Mak had given to Nak. A while later Mak, after recovering from his injuries in a temple made his way back to the house and found the lovely Nak and the new baby waiting anxiously for him. Relieved and proud of his new son, he knew nothing of their demise and settled back into the loving relationship. As she doted on Mak, she kept the baby held tightly to her and the new warm family life commenced.



    Several months later, Maks friend and other villagefolk tried to tell him about that failed birth but Mak and his devotion to Nak angrily denied this possibility. Mak blinded by love, continued in this idyll until one evening when he was outside the house and bending over, he noticed that Nak had dropped something beneath the stilted house. Rather than leaving the house to retrieve it, she extended her arm between the floor boards to reach it, six foot from the ground. Thai people believe that it is possible to see ghosts if you view backwards between the legs. Mak was shocked and tried to ignore what he had seen. Later on in the story Mak returned home and realised that the seemingly well maintained house was actually now derelict and rat infested. As the realization dawned on him, that maybe the villagefolk had been true after all, he ran from the house only to hear the sobs and wails of Nak, clutching her baby on the steps of the house beckoning him to return.



    Enraged at losing her true love, Nak decided to take revenge on the villagers and embarked on a reign of terror. The villagers were terrified and unable to protect themselves, they were even unable to take refuge in Wat Mahubut. After burning down the house of Nak and Mak and other failed attempts at ridding Phra Khanong of this avenging spirit, they saught the help of a revered monk.

    Although a difficult exorcism, this monk was able to finally rid Naks spirit from her body and have her face the truth that her love would be unrequited. As a final measure the monk removed a platelet of bone from her forehead and used this to bless with holy symbols and scripture. This bone platelet is apparently located still at the Wat Mahabut temple along with a shrine to Mae Nak herself. Thousands of Thai people make pilgrimages every year to this shrine to make offerings to Naks spirit.
    Thai Ghost Story - Thai Ghosts, each Thai ghost in Thailand,

    Was made into a movie too...


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    Member IceSpike's Avatar
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    Never put up a fence on your property in the Kingdom before you build a Home or Commercial Building. Bad JuJu, bad spirts will move in, according to Thais.(note they will build the fence, but not your structure)

  7. #7
    Member IceSpike's Avatar
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    I know a story of Hunky Dory now my story began, I know another about His Brother and now my Story is Done!
    Thai Story my best English translation!

  8. #8
    Newbie Hoof Hearted's Avatar
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    One of the older in-laws passed away not too long ago and we did the week long praying and funeral and etc... I noticed everyday my mother in law was keeping a pan of water outside the house near the front door. I was told that she was worried about the ghost of her brother following her into the house and the water would keep him from doing so. I keep wondering why Thai people are so fearful of ghosts, I mean especially if it was a loved family member? Wouldnt you love to see them one more time ? The explanation i got was something to the effect that they don't like being dead and if you see their ghost its because they are looking for a new body to inhabit so that they can live again. I kept my opinions about the water pan defense to myself but im thinking that if you live on an island you should never have ghost problems.

  9. #9
    Newbie Hoof Hearted's Avatar
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    Oh yes and one more thing i forgot. During the week that the deceased uncle in law was at the temple before his cremation, the family had to make sure there was always someone (as in a monk) around at night to make sure no cats should jump onto or walk across the coffin.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pattayardm View Post
    Check out the stories of Sun-ton-poo. There is a memorial to him in Laem Mae Pim in Rayong province and the images from his stories you will see in many places around Thailand.

    He has been described as the "William Shakespeare of Thailand".

    Its best if you get a Thai to tell you the complete story - so far I have been unable to find it anywhere online in English language.
    Better to search on Sunthorn Phu, that's the more common English spelling of his name. All his works are available in English although mostly from academic publishers. The most well-known of his works, and the one which deals most with ghosts and daemons, is Phra Aphai Mani, available in English (and pretty abridged) here Phra Aphai Mani : Contents

    UNESCO class him as one the world's most important poets and, more impressively, he was turned into a Google logo for his 200th birthday last year.



    The motherlode though, is Khun Chang Khun Phaen. One of the best known and most important works of Thai literature and a huge treasure-house of Thai belief, superstition, ghost stories and myth. Wiki has a good description of it
    Khun Chang Khun Phaen is an old story in the Thai language. It originated as a folktale some time before the eighteenth century, developed by storytellers who recited episodes for local audiences, and passed on the story by word-of-mouth. By the eighteenth century, such performances had become the most popular form of entertainment in Siam. The storytellers recounted the story in stylized recitation, using two small sticks of wood (krap) to give rhythm and emphasis. The performances typically lasted a full night.
    Almost every Thai knows the story of Khun Chang Khun Phaen. Most children have to memorize and recite extracts at school.
    Until recently a full english translation was impossible to find but recently Chris Baker and Pasuk Phongpaichit have published an excellent, and full, English translation. It's published by Silkworm Books. There are two volumes, get both. The first is the story itself, the second is a volume of notes and references. The Tale of Khun Chang Khun Phaen: Siam's Great Folk Epic of Love and War | Silkworm Books

    From the blurb for the above;
    the most outstanding classic in the Thai language. The plot is a love story, set against a background of war,
    ending in high tragedy. This folk epic was first developed in oral form for
    popular performance with a fast-paced blend of romance, tragedy, and
    farce spiced with sex, warring, adventure, and the supernatural. It was
    later adopted by the Siamese court and written down, with two kings
    contributing. This first-ever translation is based on Prince Damrong's
    standard edition of 1917--18, with over a hundred passages recovered from
    earlier versions.
    This English translation is written in lively prose, fully annotated, with
    over four hundred original line drawings and an essay on the history
    and background of the tale. The main volume presents the entire tale
    in translation. The companion volume contains alternative chapters and
    extensions, Prince Damrong's prefaces, and reference lists of flora, fauna,
    costume, arms, and food. The volumes are available separately or as a
    slipcased set.
    According to the leading Thai linguist William Gedney, "if all other
    information on traditional Thai culture were to be lost, the whole complex
    could be reconstructed from this marvellous text."

    About the translat
    BTW, these were all originally poems and designed for recitation, not reading. Thai literature didn't bother with prose tales until influenced by Western literature in the 20th Century.
    Last edited by DrB0b; 15-10-2011 at 11:30 AM.
    don't you know there ain't no devil, there's just god when he's drunk

  11. #11
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    Here's a myth related to the current flooding, this myth is common to all the Tai-speaking peoples.

    Many, many years ago the people of the world grew selfish and wicked. The Gods were angered and sent a great flood to destroy all but three people. Those three survivors were taken to heaven and given the task of being the founders of a new race of people. To help them in their task the Gods created the buffalo and gave this animal to the three ancestors of the Tai. The buffalo would help them to live and survive wherever they went.

    The ancestors were then sent back to earth where they used the buffalo to cultivate a field of rice. Once the rice had been harvested the buffalo died. From the body of the buffalo a plant grew. The plant bore fruit that looked like melons. When the fruits ripened they opened and from them emerged the members of a new human race. These new humans were both dark and light skinned.

    The Gods taught these people how to grow rice and how to make shelter and Phra Ind, the Hindu God Indra, sent his son, Khun Borom Rachatirath (the name of this myth is "The tale of Khun Borom") to be their King and teacher. For a quarter of a century he ruled the Tai peoples, he taught them how to worship the Gods and how to take care of the land. He warned them that if they ever forgot these teachings then the floods would return.

    Khun Borom had seven sons. At the end of his 25 years he divided the kingdom of the Tai between his sons. They were given the Kingdoms of Ayutthaya, Luang Prabang, Hongsawadi, Sipsong Pan Na, Xiangkhuang (in Laos, it's where the Plain of Jars is), Northern Vietnam, and Chiang Mai. These kingdoms, or divisions, were called "Muang", a word that should be well known to those of that live in Thailand.

    The rest of the story (of which this is just one variant) deals with the descendants of those Kings and the legendary history of their Kingdoms. I live in Chiang Mai. The name of the son of Khun Borom who was given the Kingdom of Chiang Mai was Khun Saiphong. A descendant of his (9th generation or so) was named Mengrai. King Mengrai is generally acknowledged to be the historical founder of the Tai City State (there was another tribe and city on the site before) of Chiang Mai. At that point we leave myth and enter history.

    This is one of the foundation myths of Tai culture. It's a legendary retelling of the genuine foundation of Tai culture in Southern China and the subsequent migrations of the Tai peoples to the areas they occupy today.


    (BTW, there's another myth in which the ancestors of the Kings of Lanna appear to have arrived in Northern Thailand in a Flying Saucer, but I'll save that for another day )

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    What an interesting thread, thank you contributors.

  14. #14
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    Cut and pasted.
    Have you ever wondered why not everyone is rich or very beautiful? It is all to do with their past deeds.
    Here are just a few of the things that Thai people believe in.
    If you build or maintain public roads in this lifetime, you will have your own car in the next.
    If you donate robes to a monk in this lifetime, you will have fashionable clothes in the next.
    If you donate food to the poor in this lifetime, you will have plenty of food in the next.
    If you are stingy with your money in this lifetime, you will be poor in the next.
    If you donate money to the temple in this lifetime, you will have a large house in the next.
    If you put flowers on the shrine in this lifetime, you will be beautiful or handsome in the next.
    If you pray often in this lifetime, you will be clever in the next.
    If you release birds or fish you will enjoy a long life in the next.
    If you kill people in this lifetime, you will die young in the next.
    If you abuse your husband in this lifetime, you will be a spinster in the next.
    If you have affairs with married women in this lifetime, you will never find a wife in the next
    If you donate oil for lamps at the temple in this lifetime, you will have bright eyes in the next.
    If you are rude to your parents in this lifetime, you will be deaf and dumb in the next.
    If you didn't pay your debts in this lifetime, you will be born as a cow in the next.
    If you donate medicine for sick people in this lifetime, you will be healthy in the next.
    If you are cruel and cold-hearted in this lifetime, you will be all alone in the next.
    If you like to look at nude pictures in this lifetime, you will be blind in the next.
    If you gossip about people in this lifetime, you will have a harelip in the next
    If you like cheating people in this lifetime, you will be born as an animal in the next.
    If you don't help people in danger in this lifetime, you will be in prison in the next.
    If you sneer at beggars in this lifetime, you will starve to death in the next.
    If you look down on servants in this lifetime, you will be ugly in the next.
    If you don't believe in the Buddhist teaching in this lifetime, then you will be deaf in the next.
    If you hurt animals in this lifetime, you will have leprosy in the next.
    If you are envious of other people in this lifetime, you will have body odour in the next.
    If you make a false charge against a monk in this lifetime, you will be struck by lightning in the next.

  15. #15
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    Sister in law dreamt her husband killed in motorcycle accident eight years ago was hungry in the dream, took food to the temple for him the next day.

  16. #16
    Molecular Mixup
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    Hot weather and ghost stories... ?
    For me you need howling gales , the wind rattling the door , the fire flickering and maybe a branch tapping on the window pane.

    The OP asks for Asian ghost stories ,so here's one of my favourites
    a Japanese film from 1968 '' Kaidan Yuki-jorou ''



    It follows the ancient tale of the Yuki-Onna or snow woman / ghost ,
    who appears in bad snow storms, and kills men with her icy breath.
    Will the Two woodcutters , caught out in a blizzard, survive meeting her ?


    K


    Can be watched on youtube in several parts , or downloaded from some bit torrent sites.
    subtitled and takes a while to get going, but stands up well for an old movie
    lovely actress too



  17. #17
    Member Minnie Maugham's Avatar
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    ^ I remember that flick. Lots of scary movies on telly in Japan in hot, hot, hot humid August -- supposed to give you the chills. Kuchisaka onna is a good story. (google is your friend). I got another one but it's buried in the recesses at the mo.

  18. #18
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    ^That's kuchisake (口裂け), but being your friend means Google will also probably help with the spelling.

  19. #19
    Member Minnie Maugham's Avatar
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    ^ You are right. Typos do occur. BTW, pity you do not know more about Mr Lee. A much more honorable man than Abe ever was.

  20. #20
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    couple of years back after young BIL funeral/wake and cremation ( cancer), was driving back alone from The Wat to go feed the dogs.
    I usually drive with my window down as hate aircon...anyways about a click away from the Wat the window closes of its own accord...so I thinks f..it electric problem and opened it again..it stayed down a minute or so then closed again..opened it half way before it closed again..
    Just about to push the down button again when this fricking rock from a passing truck slams into the door frame just above the window...????

    So was telling the wife about it the following week and she recounted this from the same day.
    Apparently two cousins on a motorbike were following SIL also on a motorbike returning home from the Wat. Both bikes stopped for gas or something and the cousins on the following bike asked SIL ...where is the guy that got on behind you when you stopped back there?.....Cousins had been following the SIL bike with the passenger for several kilometers... the description which followed was that of her brother......


    When we were building our house on our farm we had the usual encampment of labourers...
    They all told my wife one morning that they had all dreamed of a lady in white calling to them to go with her...two of the labourers were a gay couple ..they left never to return.
    Soon after the wife and I were camping out in my newly built shed..the wife had the same dream as did her twin sister 80 kl away...
    Since then my step daughter has seen a lady in white standing beside our road out of the farm...in daylight while she riding her motorbike....

    Last month my wife her twin sister, mother and step daughter in Phuket had the same dream again! It was shortly after the death of FIL at our house from snakebite....another two day visit to the Wat followed....

    Left alone on the farm the wife told me not to go outside after dark and if I hear anyone calling me ignore it......

    She is out cutting rubber in the dark at the moment...

    I ain't heard or seen anything and the ladies in my dreams are ...well they don't wear white..

  21. #21
    Crepitus
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    ^^
    .... just remembered a somewhat black humorous PS...
    ....was at the market last week ..noticed all the old ladies at the stalls were either avoiding eye contact or looking at me strangely......I asked the wife que..?..

    ....seems they had all heard that it was ME that was bitten by the snake!

  22. #22
    Member Minnie Maugham's Avatar
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    ^ Good stories, thanks. Hint: Never pick up a banded krait, even when it's having an afternoon snooze.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minnie Maugham View Post
    ^ You are right. Typos do occur. BTW, pity you do not know more about Mr Lee. A much more honorable man than Abe ever was.
    Awfully defensive about the typo, aren't you? Some people might actually be interested looking into the details of that particular Japanese spook. It's interesting to me that the Japanese are so broadly inclined to believe in specters and things that go bump in the night, given the country's reputation as the world's technological leader. Their tendency toward superstition is another way they are similar to the Thais.

    I know all I need to know about the traitor Lee (a comparison of the traitor Jeff Davis to Lincoln would make more sense, by the way, in terms of their respective roles). Arlington Cemetery is a fitting memorial. The hypocrisy of you neo-Confederates never ceases to amaze; you pretend to be uber-patriots yet celebrate the cause of treason in defense of slavery, which nearly destroyed the country.

    Some pretty good ghost stories around Civil War battlefields though, eh? I wouldn't blame the young men pointlessly sacrificed in Pickett's Charge for coming back as restless souls. I expect they haunted Lee for the rest of his days.
    “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.” Dorothy Parker

  24. #24
    Member Minnie Maugham's Avatar
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    ^ Yes, because General Lee had a conscience.

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    A week after the floods started , the little river at the back of my wives land had risen quite high and was running fast ,, A couple of young guys < brothers > were net fishing from the bridge when one fell in , his brother was unable to pull him out . Help was soon on hand but were unable to find him till the next day . Next day my wife asked where the camera was , why i ask ??? she said she had a dream about the missing man and he asked for a camera , Off she goes , camera in hand when she gets there there was a large crowd < plus the food carts > Five minutes of being there a man looking for the body , in a boat and video camera fell into the water , the camera never to be seen again ,, Why would a dead man want a camera ????

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