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  1. #26
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    two from Allain Manesson Mallet


    Title: Partie Orientale De La Terre Ferme De L' Inde Moderne

    Cartographer: Mallet, Allain Manesson
    Published: Paris
    Date: 1683
    Size: [ca. 15 x 11 cm]
    Technique: Copper engraving later handcolor
    Description: Copper engraving, hand colored in wash and outline. Decorative engraved map showing the gulf of Bengal with Burma and Thailand and neighbouring countries. With several engraved names of rivers and regions
    Source & larger image



    Sunda Islands
    Die Inseln von Sonte gegen Occident - Isles de la sonde vers occident
    Artist: Mallet, Allain Manesson
    Frankfurt, 1719 [ca. 15 x 11 cm]
    Copper engraving, hand colored in wash and outline. Small and decorative map of the Sunda Islands seen again West with Sumatra, Java, the neighboring gulf of Siam and Bengal and Borneo. Ornated with a maritime title cartouche.
    Source and larger image

  2. #27
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    Forgive me for going 'off-topic', but as well as collecting maps of Asia, one can also have a secondary collection of maps from one's place of origin. I happen to come from Devon in England. Here, for example is a sea chart by a mariner called Captain Collins. Mid 1700s, It cost about GBP 110 at auction.

    Remember, when you buy at auction , you have to add on the auctioneer's commission of about 20%. The great thing about buying maps is that they can be rolled up and sent to Asia for about US$30. Do not buy framed maps, as it costs a lot to send a framed picture, and the glass often smashes.


  3. #28
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    1540 Map of Asia

    This one from NIU Centre for Burma Studies, and simply titled 1540 Map of Asia; at this point Australia was 'off the map'



    ************
    And: anyone interested in old maps of Australia/NZ - try this site
    Australia in Maps: 1540-1898

  4. #29
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    same map as above, with source and info this time

    Sebastian Munster: India Extrema XIX Nova Tabula



    Title: India Extrema XIX Nova Tabula (1st Printed Map of Asia)
    Map Maker: Sebastian Munster
    Place / Date: Basle / 1542
    Coloring: Uncolored
    Size: 13.5 x 10 inches

    The map shows Asia from the Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf to the Pacific. The Pacific Ocean shows an archipelago of 7448 islands, a forerunner to the better understanding of Southeast Asia, which is largely unrecognizeable, although Java Minor and Major, Porne (Borneo), Moluca and several other islands are named. The map does not include Japan, which appears on the map of America. The northeastern coast of Asia is also omitted. The map also includes a large sea monster and mermaid type creature.

    Although largely based on Ptolemy's work, the map incorporates some of the more recent Portuguese discoveries. The outlines of the Indian subcontinent, between the Indus and the Ganges rivers are now in a more recognizable form, with "Zaylon" (Sri Lanka) correctly shown as an island. The Portuguese outpost sof Goa and Calicut, the first place where Vasco da Gama landed in 1497, are depicted. Further to the east "Taprobana" is also designated as "Sumatra.". The Portugese trading port of "Malaqua" is shown. Java is depicted as two separate islands. "Moloca," center of the spice island trade and the object of considerable conflict between Spain and Portugal is shown. The resolution of the dispute was the official purpose of Magellan's epic circumnavigation. The treatment of "Cathay" (China) is consistent with the writings of Marco Polo and other Venetian travellers.

    This 1542 state of the map is unchanged from the 1540 edition. Munster's Geographia was a cartographic landmark, including not only Ptolemaic maps, but also a number of landmark modern maps, including the first separate maps of the 4 continents, the first map of England and the earliest obtainable map of Scandinavia. Munster dominated cartographic publication during the mid-16th Century. Munster is generally regarded as one of the most important map makers of the 16th Century.

    Sebastien Munster was a linguist and mathematician, who initially taught Hebrew in Heidelberg. He issued his first mapping of Germany in 1529, after which he issued a call for geographical information about Germany to scholars throughout the country. The response was better than hoped for, and included substantial foreign material, which supplied him with up to date, if not necessarily accurate maps for the issuance of his Geographia in 1540.

  5. #30
    Mid
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    Old Maps & Prints, Bangkok
    Ann Abel
    02.25.11



    German antiquarian Joerg Kohler moved to Bangkok in 1992 because he loved the city's "organized chaos." That also describes his jewel box shop, opened four years later in the River City antiques center. Some 10,000 maps and prints, mostly of pre-20th-century Southeast Asia, hang in frames, lie in stacks on shelves and in drawers, or stand in flip-through files--and only he knows how they're organized.

    When I admired the script on a small map of Java, Kohler excitedly told me it came from Histoire Générale des Voyages, circa 1750, whose lead cartographer was a French hydrographer named Jacques-Nicolas Bellin and primary engraver was a Dutchman, Jacob van der Schley. Intrigued, I asked if he had a section devoted to maps in the same style. No, he said, no section; then he pulled similar specimens from seemingly random piles around the store.



    But coming here with a destination in mind is missing the point. Browsing takes visitors through Thailand, Burma, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Indonesia, and Malaysia: Borders shift and names change, reflecting colonial whim and cartographers' burgeoning knowledge.

    Buyers are attuned to the investment potential of quality pieces, but Kohler also appreciates maps as aesthetic artifacts. Among his favorites is a Jan Huyghen van Linschoten map from 1595, which he loves because "it is quite decorative, with compass roses, sea monsters, rhinos, and giraffes." And a history lesson, too: "By leading the way to the Spice Islands, it more or less changed the world."

    One item his collection no longer includes is that Java map I liked so much--that's mine now.

    forbes.com

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