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  1. #51
    Thailand Expat
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    ^
    That's weird...

  2. #52
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    Maybe they should consider helping the poor, instead...

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaitongBoy View Post
    Maybe they should consider helping the poor, instead...
    No profit in that scheme.

  4. #54
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottish Gary
    Do the girls from Surin not have some kind of magic tattoo? I remember a bar girl telling me that she didn't like working with the ladies of Surin because their tattoos gave them some sort of special power. Hocus pocus to me but this girl was deadly serious.
    The tattoo is usually on the top of their back just below the neck.

  5. #55
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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  6. #56
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Thailand's love


    She says she was selling small souvenirs around four years ago, when she had the feeling that one of her dolls, Ploy, was trying to help. She began to treat the doll like a real child, and her business took off. She says she was also able to overcome difficulties she was having raising her son.
    "We can rely on luk thep mentally", she says. "They make us happy, as if they are alive, and we can carry them around with us. I love dressing them up, and talking to them. And if you look after them properly, they will come into your dreams."

    ...

    A similar fate may eventually await the luk thep dolls.
    ..meanwhile, in Japan...

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainNemo View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Thailand's love


    She says she was selling small souvenirs around four years ago, when she had the feeling that one of her dolls, Ploy, was trying to help. She began to treat the doll like a real child, and her business took off. She says she was also able to overcome difficulties she was having raising her son.
    "We can rely on luk thep mentally", she says. "They make us happy, as if they are alive, and we can carry them around with us. I love dressing them up, and talking to them. And if you look after them properly, they will come into your dreams."

    ...

    A similar fate may eventually await the luk thep dolls.
    ..meanwhile, in Japan...
    Usually the fashions begin in the north and work their way south...

  8. #58
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    Below is a list of the legends believed to be ghost, found in and around Thailand.

    Chao Kam Nai Wen – believed as a soul sitting on the rear of a person.
    Krahang - believed as a male impression that can fly when night.
    Krasue - believed as a woman's head with her internal organs hanging down from her neckline.
    Mae Nak - believed as a female ghost who perished at the time of delivery and that she can extend her arms.
    Mae Sue - believed as a protector goddess or a female ghost of newborns and toddlers.
    Nang Takian - believed as a tree spirit dwelling in Hopea odorata trees.
    Nang Tani - believed as a young woman haunting definite masses of banana trees that appears on full moon night-time.
    Phi - believed as a spirit that sits on a person's chest during the night
    Phi Hua Khat - believed as a headless male soul that carries his head
    Phi Phraya - believed as a female ghost living in the water similar to an Undine
    Phi Phong - believed as a vindictive male spirit having a nasty smell. It lives in dark places under the trees or vegetation.
    Phi Pop - believed as an unkind female soul that gobbles human intestines.
    Phi Song Nang - believed as female spirit that first traps or tempts, and then attack and murder young men.
    Phi Tai Hong - believed as the soul of a person that suffered a sudden violent or cruel death.
    Phi Tai Thong Klom - believed as the furious ghost of a woman having committed suicide after being made pregnant and subsequently betrayed and abandoned by her lover.
    Phi Thale - believed as a spirit of the sea. It manifests itself in different ways, one of them being St. Elmo's fire, among other mysterious sensation experienced by sailors and fishermen while on boats.
    Pret - believed as an extremely tall hungry ghost part of the Buddhist legends. It looks like a very tall and thin man with a very small mouth.
    Phi Dip Chin - believed as a jumping ghost from the Chinese legends, dressed in an antediluvian outfit and having a written paper in front of his façade.
    Phi Kong Koi - believed as a jungle vampire with one leg.
    Kuman Thong - believed as a spirit looking like a young boy robed in primeval clothing.
    Rak-Yom - believed as appearing as two young boys similar to Kuman Thong.
    Phi Tabo - believed as a blind soul with hollow eyes.
    Phi Ka - believed as a gluttonous spirit.
    Phi Tai Ha - believed as a spirit of persons having died of an accident.
    Phi Ma Bong - believed as a female ghost from Northern Thailand similar to a Centaur or Kelpie.
    Pu Som Fao Sap - believed as a male spirit who guards treasures appearing like a honored old man.
    Khamot - believed as a glowing soul.
    Phi Phong - believed as a male ghost from Northern Thailand and is related to frogs.
    Phi Phuthao - believed as an impression appearing like a very old man.
    Phi Lang Khluang - believed as a spirit from Southern Thailand with a very large wound in the rear.
    Phi Tuai Khaeo - believed as the ghost that makes the upside-down goblet move.
    Phi Pluak - believed as the spirit of the termites.
    Suea Sa Ming - believed as a male or female who converted into a tiger as a result of the power of black magic.
    Kwai Thanu, also known as Vo Thanu - believed as a mystic bull or aquatic buffalo.
    Hun Pha Yon - believed as an fake human or non-human.
    Phi Ngu, also known as Phraya Ngu, or Ngueak Ngu - believed as a spirit linked with snakes or that may appear in snake form, in human form or in a amalgamation of both forms.

    The practice of black magic in Thailand revolves around these ghost or spirits or souls, and spell casters will enchant black magic spell to lure these spirits or to capture them or to please them so that they help the person in need. It is also assumed that not only the spell caster but also the owner has to keep them pleased for the help they extend towards the person.

    One such theory of pleasing spirits for their help, is used when someone wants to own a kuman thong, it is such believed that the owner who possesses kuman thong will have luck and fortune, and would never be defeated by his or her enemies. To own a spirit known as kuman thong, rituals are performed which requires the not born fetus from the mother’s womb and it is such observed that the spirit from the fetus is then captured in a wooden or clay statue, and is kept in a secure place with the owner of kuman thong.

    Once the fetus is removed then the body of the child is taken in a cemetery and rituals are performed and the body is roasted. The statue created to capture Kuman Thong is also known as Hong Pray. The practice of making kuman thong statues, are mostly practiced in Siam.

    According to some ancient and old Thai document and scriptures, it has been learnt that the actual method of acquiring a kuman thong starts when a baby dies in its mother’s womb, after which the baby is taken out from the womb and painted with a coat of Ya Lak, covered with gold leaves or petals and then roasted until completely dry, and this ritual should be performed in a cemetery and should finish before dawn.

    Since this was the actual method of obtaining the spirit hence it was named as KUMAN THONG meaning golden baby or golden boy, as KUMAN in Thai means baby boy and THONG means gold. This spirit also gives us an overview of the legend of Khun Chang Khun Phaen, who first made KUMAN THONG by removing his own unborn baby from the womb of his wife, so that the spirit of his unborn can help him succeed over his enemies.

    Thailand is also famous for its black magic used in the form of amulets or statues, and black magic spells are performed to stimulate these spiritual powers and then relocate these powers in various matters like diagrams (mainly geometrical shaped) or on cloths or even on the body as form of tattoos. The objects or matters in which these powers are stored are often referred as the YAN.

    The YAN is basically used for different purposes by the owners of those mystical powers, like for protection, or for luck, or for money. At times the Yan is even inserted under the skin. The prevalence of ghost and black magic is so common in Thailand that there are even markets selling black magic stuffs and spiritual items. One of the oldest such market can be found in Yogyakarta’s Beringharjo market.

    Black magic in Thailand is also used for blocking bad spirits, since people in Thailand believes so much in spirits and ghosts that they most of the time use black magic spell and cast rituals to make sure that bad and evil spirits are away from them. One such spell used is known as penangal balak, which is used to block bad spells casted on someone or to stop evil spirits from causing harm.

    Use of different types and kinds of oil is also linked with black magic in Thailand, since oil is considered not only for healing and cure but also for fighting the bad part of black magic. Another, yet interesting concept followed in Thailand related to black magic is about the black magic woman.

    Black magic woman or what it is known as the MAE NAK, can be found in Wat Mahabhut, were the tabernacle houses the body or statue of the black magic woman or Mae Nak. People of Thailand who are having problem in their conjugal life or have sex related problem, visit this place and offer presents to get her blessings. Mae Nak is also considered to bless people in love and that they stay with each other only for their life time.

    Black magic in Thailand not only ends with spirits, ghosts, souls or talismans but also extends to the use and practice of voodoo known as barang. Thou they are considered illegal, but still practiced by lot of black magic spell caster. Another form of magic that is performed in Issan, the north east part of Thailand is known as YA SANG. Ya Sang is an old concept of black magic where the use of poisonous plants exists, triggering abdominal disorders, bodily pain, intoxication and even used for bringing death to the victim.

  9. #59
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Thaksin was a firm, probably still is, in Black Magic.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    Is it there or China that has the thing with the pubic hair in the drink.
    I dunno, but I'm aware of several villagers claiming that other women have added menstrual fluid to a man's drink (or food) and have successfully gotten him to turn his head away from wife and family and go her way. icky!

    Issarn wifey says that Buriram is ground zero for seemingly common folks practicing various forms of black magic.

    She'd be viewed as suspect if, for example she invited a friend from Buriram to her village for a visit, which was a possibility for awhile as there are two Buriramers living on the same compound as us in Saudi.

    However, she has since concluded they're both a waste of space and basically avoids them.

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