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  1. #26
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Big business in Thailand. All sorts selling black magic spells and counter spells. Google "black magic thailand". Pages of stuff like this. Even more if search in Thai.

    Black Magic Love Spells - Black Magic Money Spells - Black Magic Love Sell - The Real Magic from THAILAND

  2. #27
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    Devil women

  3. #28
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    The mentality shows when Thaksin Shinawatra, whilst prime minister, announced that he believed in 'Black Magic'. In Thailand, A Little Black Magic Is Politics as Usual - TIME

  4. #29
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    INdeed - a master in his formative years of leaving big bundles of paper, cash mostly, in places and as a result, lots of positive things happened for him. In later years people were performing the same voodoo on him, where upon receiving pieces of paper with his name on it, usually in the form of pay-in slips to his offshore bank accounts, he would be compelled to do something as well.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus
    Perceived / learned helplessness is often at the route of why these magic healings seem to work,
    How would you feel if your only resource for health was the local 30 baht hospital? Thais are always looking for a Plan B. White string from every house in the moo ban connected together emanating from the local Wat. Community protection against evil.

  6. #31
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    Black Magic and Thai Amulets. When visiting Thailand you may well notice many Thai people (and more and more farangs), both male and female wearing Buddhist amulets around their necks (พระเครื่อง prá-krűeang), these amulets are viewed by most Thai people as sacred objects that are created and blessed by monks.



    Legend has it that in Thailand’s long distance past and during a devastating drought that had tormented the Kingdom, a renowned Monk was invited by the then King to go to a particular province and help ease the situation. Before leaving and unable to take a large Buddha statue from his temple, he dreamed that the statue told him to make a smaller replica of himself, from clay found in the temple and take that instead. He did as the dream had told him and made a replica of the large Buddha which he took with him to the province. Later the drought eased, later still he gave this amulet to the King, who asked the monk to make other amulets and spread them among the people.



    Most Thai amulets feature Buddha images, while others may depict the image of a famous monk, or even images of the monks who made the amulet. There are also amulets that depict demons, Kuman Thong, Nawagote, Nong Kwak, Pidda (Pidta), tigers, dragons and Saliga (love-birds).

    Amulets come in a variety of different materials such as plaster, bone, wood, glass, metal, precious stone, gold and silver and even a greater variety of shapes and sizes. Some may contain the ash from incenses or old temple buildings, or the dirt from specific graveyards, while others may hold pollen, herbs, metal bars (with Scripture carved on) and yet others may contain hair or blood from a famous monk, the later are believed to add further protectoral power to the amulet.

    Once the amulet is crafted, the maker will chant, (alone or in the company of other monks) pray and bless the amulet, a process that may take from one week to 3 years.

    The power in the amulet is not based on the price paid for it or its size, the spiritual power it possesses depends on the creator and its price is a reflection on the scarcity of the maker and the year it was made. Some Luang Phor Tuad, Somdej, and Buddha amulets sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars USD.

    Traditionally amulets were not purchased, to procure an amulet a worshipper would attend a temple and make a donation of money or goods (make Merit) such as oil, food, clothing etc. items the monks needed to survive. In return monks would provide the donor an amulet. While this is still the case today in many temples across the Kingdom, amulets can be purchased online or indeed from street vendors, but there is no guarantee who made it and whether it has ever been blessed by monks.



    Amulets are never worn below the waist, Takrut (without monk/ buddhist image), can be put inside your pants pocket, nor are they ever to be taken into improper places such as brothels or when actually or watching others having sex or fighting. You should Never ever touch another person’s amulet without their express permission.

    Thai people will wear an amulet (in the front or the back of the neck), with specific amulets believed to help in marriage, wealth, health, love and relationships. Some of the more desperate people who want their amulets to bring them ‘Fast Luck’ may wear amulets made from ‘kadok pi'(spirited bones) or ‘nam man prai'(spirited corpse oil). Most Thai peoples wear amulets in odd numbers such as one, three, and five and so on.

    It is also a tradition to place Thai amulets under a stupa or other temple structure when it is built.

    Listed below are just a few of the types of amulets you will find along with their spiritual meaning. It is worth noting that there are a number of different forms of Buddhism and the meanings here maybe different for each sect.

    Butterfly Amulet: For trade and relationships and for women to attract a man



    Brahma: (four-faced Buddha) amulets – For peace, family, wealth, all encompassing wisdom in decisions about life.



    Trimurti: For love, happiness, and for wishes to be granted.



    Ganesha / Ganesh: The Hindu elephant god of obstacles – Both for placing and eliminating them. This is for art, luck, and harmony in life; having a good, smooth life, without complications.



    Kwan Yin: The goddess of compassion – These amulets are for those that need healing and empathy.



    Nong Kwak: The woman calling with one hand to passerby’s – This is for business prosperity and growing a healthy business. If you look in most Chinese businesses across Asia and in the USA even, there is often a Nong Kwak amulet, image, statue, and or yang flag in a special shrine in the front of the business.



    Phra Pid Ta: The monk that covers his eyes – For protection from evil spirits, influences, and for wealth.



    Salika: Two birds facing each other – This is for success in business.



    Phra Somdej: Prosperity in business, peace, and a good life.



    Chinnarat / Jinnaraj Buddha: The Buddha amulets with the triangle behind, outlining the Buddha with wisps of fire rising off the sides – This is for defense against evil and a generally smooth life.



    Rahu: The eclipse demon seen eating the moon on various amulets – This is a reminder of beneficence.

    Wearing of these signs of faith has become ever more popular and not just in Thailand, China media reports that people are wearing Buddha Amulets as a fashion statement in countries like Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan and more recently mainland China, where sales have doubled in 2 years and cities such as Beijing who only had 3 shops selling the amulets in 2005 have more than 3,000 by 2013

    Black Magic and Amulets



    Thai people are generally very superstitious and Amulets fit snuggly within both Thai spiritual beliefs and Buddhism, outsiders may view these beliefs as being opposing views, but the people of this Kingdom have for centuries led their lives with one foot in each camp. Amulets are another example of how inanimate objects can be magical and how monks are said to possess certain supernatural powers.

  7. #32
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    One couple were forcibly removed from our village about 10 years ago and the house razed to the ground. The women had been declared a witch for several years and anything that happened was usually blamed on her. I can't remember what the last straw was, possibly the kids all coming home from school with red eyes...

    The guy returned to the village a couple of years ago, leaving his wife working in BKK. Any illness is blamed on him...including my tummy upset over Christmas. Not sure how he managed it but there you go...

    There is also a thing about being 'touched' by someone when going to the ATM. Stories are rife of witches being able to hypnotise you into giving them all the money you have just taken out. This has got to be one of those petty excuses some dizzy has come up with for stealing the money for an iphone when asked to do an ATM run...

    I usually have to bite my tongue and issue soothing words that don't break the magic ...

  8. #33
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    Thai voodo or magic working here, King Powers team now 6 points clear at the top of the EPL

  9. #34
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    Meanwhile, back in the civilized, educated world, Jesus is coming soon.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyFree View Post
    Meanwhile, back in the civilized, educated world, Jesus is coming soon.

    Siwalai.....

    Naturally.

  11. #36
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    When I read this stuff I just can't help but think fucking jungle bunnies.
    Really, they seem only just removed from the jungle village and animist practices at times.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bower View Post
    Thai voodo or magic working here, King Powers team now 6 points clear at the top of the EPL
    It's not over till the fat voodoo lady stops chanting

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme View Post
    Isaan is rife.
    Way of life.
    Give It 10 - 15 years when the old dears are gone, you won't even find spirit houses in the gardens anymore.
    Unless there's a voodoo app available on the iPhone, the young generations will soon forget about it.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Black Magic and Thai Amulets. When visiting Thailand you may well notice many Thai people (and more and more farangs), both male and female wearing Buddhist amulets around their necks (พระเครื่อง prá-krűeang), these amulets are viewed by most Thai people as sacred objects that are created and blessed by monks.



    Legend has it that in Thailand’s long distance past and during a devastating drought that had tormented the Kingdom, a renowned Monk was invited by the then King to go to a particular province and help ease the situation. Before leaving and unable to take a large Buddha statue from his temple, he dreamed that the statue told him to make a smaller replica of himself, from clay found in the temple and take that instead. He did as the dream had told him and made a replica of the large Buddha which he took with him to the province. Later the drought eased, later still he gave this amulet to the King, who asked the monk to make other amulets and spread them among the people.



    Most Thai amulets feature Buddha images, while others may depict the image of a famous monk, or even images of the monks who made the amulet. There are also amulets that depict demons, Kuman Thong, Nawagote, Nong Kwak, Pidda (Pidta), tigers, dragons and Saliga (love-birds).

    Amulets come in a variety of different materials such as plaster, bone, wood, glass, metal, precious stone, gold and silver and even a greater variety of shapes and sizes. Some may contain the ash from incenses or old temple buildings, or the dirt from specific graveyards, while others may hold pollen, herbs, metal bars (with Scripture carved on) and yet others may contain hair or blood from a famous monk, the later are believed to add further protectoral power to the amulet.

    Once the amulet is crafted, the maker will chant, (alone or in the company of other monks) pray and bless the amulet, a process that may take from one week to 3 years.

    The power in the amulet is not based on the price paid for it or its size, the spiritual power it possesses depends on the creator and its price is a reflection on the scarcity of the maker and the year it was made. Some Luang Phor Tuad, Somdej, and Buddha amulets sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars USD.

    Traditionally amulets were not purchased, to procure an amulet a worshipper would attend a temple and make a donation of money or goods (make Merit) such as oil, food, clothing etc. items the monks needed to survive. In return monks would provide the donor an amulet. While this is still the case today in many temples across the Kingdom, amulets can be purchased online or indeed from street vendors, but there is no guarantee who made it and whether it has ever been blessed by monks.



    Amulets are never worn below the waist, Takrut (without monk/ buddhist image), can be put inside your pants pocket, nor are they ever to be taken into improper places such as brothels or when actually or watching others having sex or fighting. You should Never ever touch another person’s amulet without their express permission.

    Thai people will wear an amulet (in the front or the back of the neck), with specific amulets believed to help in marriage, wealth, health, love and relationships. Some of the more desperate people who want their amulets to bring them ‘Fast Luck’ may wear amulets made from ‘kadok pi'(spirited bones) or ‘nam man prai'(spirited corpse oil). Most Thai peoples wear amulets in odd numbers such as one, three, and five and so on.

    It is also a tradition to place Thai amulets under a stupa or other temple structure when it is built.

    Listed below are just a few of the types of amulets you will find along with their spiritual meaning. It is worth noting that there are a number of different forms of Buddhism and the meanings here maybe different for each sect.

    Butterfly Amulet: For trade and relationships and for women to attract a man



    Brahma: (four-faced Buddha) amulets – For peace, family, wealth, all encompassing wisdom in decisions about life.



    Trimurti: For love, happiness, and for wishes to be granted.



    Ganesha / Ganesh: The Hindu elephant god of obstacles – Both for placing and eliminating them. This is for art, luck, and harmony in life; having a good, smooth life, without complications.



    Kwan Yin: The goddess of compassion – These amulets are for those that need healing and empathy.



    Nong Kwak: The woman calling with one hand to passerby’s – This is for business prosperity and growing a healthy business. If you look in most Chinese businesses across Asia and in the USA even, there is often a Nong Kwak amulet, image, statue, and or yang flag in a special shrine in the front of the business.



    Phra Pid Ta: The monk that covers his eyes – For protection from evil spirits, influences, and for wealth.



    Salika: Two birds facing each other – This is for success in business.



    Phra Somdej: Prosperity in business, peace, and a good life.



    Chinnarat / Jinnaraj Buddha: The Buddha amulets with the triangle behind, outlining the Buddha with wisps of fire rising off the sides – This is for defense against evil and a generally smooth life.



    Rahu: The eclipse demon seen eating the moon on various amulets – This is a reminder of beneficence.

    Wearing of these signs of faith has become ever more popular and not just in Thailand, China media reports that people are wearing Buddha Amulets as a fashion statement in countries like Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan and more recently mainland China, where sales have doubled in 2 years and cities such as Beijing who only had 3 shops selling the amulets in 2005 have more than 3,000 by 2013

    Black Magic and Amulets



    Thai people are generally very superstitious and Amulets fit snuggly within both Thai spiritual beliefs and Buddhism, outsiders may view these beliefs as being opposing views, but the people of this Kingdom have for centuries led their lives with one foot in each camp. Amulets are another example of how inanimate objects can be magical and how monks are said to possess certain supernatural powers.
    I steer clear of women wearing jewellery at the best of times, but I take those amulet necklaces as a clear sign of failing an IQ test and coming from a bad news bumpkin world. Never mind the old Sakr Yant back tattoos - I've met women who I notices had had the tats lasered off - you can just see the faint traces in the nightclub light, which speaks of a "past", best avoided. Same goes for all of 'em, maintain a polite distance. Superstition is everywhere, but much more where circs are desperate.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1F2i0rYMj8

    we are all figments of our own imagination.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton
    My (Filipina) wife of many years is both bright and educated. Also a rare Filipina in that she sees the Catholic church for what it is. But, she does believe (like almost all Filipinos) in faith healers.
    I have my personal experience with a Filipino quack doctor.

    It was a long time ago when I was still quite young. Tap water sevice was quite patchy. One time it was gone for several days. We had a few containers and as there was plenty of rain they were topped off with rain water.

    My wife and I developed a bad skin rash that got worse every day until I told my wife we really need to see a doctor. She told me a doctor is no good for this kind of thing we should se a quack doctor and told me he would advise us to see a real doctor when he thinks it is necessary.

    So we went to the quack. He inquired about the water we are using and told us, tap water is ok, rain water is ok too, however mixing them is no good. That's probably the cause of the rash. We should wash only with rain water until the tap water returns. He also said he can treat it. He smoked some herbal mix and blew the smoke over my and my wifes skin. Today is thursday, not a good day to treat this and we should return on saturday for a repetition. But it will be much better tomorrow. No need to mention that I was quite sceptical.

    It was very much better the next day and on saturday it was gone almost without a trace. We still returned for a second treatment. Total cost was not much more than the coffee he served us would cost in a local restaurant.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

  16. #41
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    My prostrate is playing up, might head to the phils and see if i can find a quack doctor to blow some smoke up my arse

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by nora tittoff View Post
    My prostrate is playing up, might head to the phils and see if i can find a quack doctor to blow some smoke up my arse

  18. #43
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    I've got Voodoo in my pants

  19. #44
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    ^ You do?

  20. #45
    Valve Master Latindancer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang
    I honestly believe he has been hypnotized or something..
    Drugged is the most likely explanation.
    I agree. That is the actual reason Caribbean Voodoo works. The drug is Scopolamine, and they have a brew of that in an impure form, made from Angels Trumpet flowers/seeds. It removes willpower, and is very Yin.
    Extremely dangerous and can easily kill.
    In Columbia they call it Burundanga, and in Venezuela, many criminals will not use it....possibly due to the possibiloity of accidental self-administration.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by nora tittoff View Post
    My prostrate is playing up, might head to the phils and see if i can find a quack doctor to blow some smoke up my arse
    If you are into that kind of thing I am sure you can find a Thai lady to provide that kind of servic.


  22. #47
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    Trouble is, he confuses lying face down (prostrate) with the gland (prostate), as many here do...

    At least his arse is right side up for the smoke-blowing procedure...

  23. #48
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    Do the girls from Surin not have some kind of magic tattoo? I remember a bar girl telling me that she didn't like working with the ladies of Surin because their tattoos gave them some sort of special power. Hocus pocus to me but this girl was deadly serious.

  24. #49
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    ^ Must be a Rural thing...

  25. #50
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    Thailand's love of the supernatural
    By Jonathan Head
    Southeast Asia correspondent

    Situated in the nondescript outer western suburbs of Bangkok, Sawang Arom temple is already well known for its collection of kuman - plastic child-dolls in historic costumes, usually clutching a bag of gold, and believed to be inhabited by the ghost of an unborn foetus.
    People visit the temple throughout the day to pray to the kuman for good fortune, lighting incense sticks and kneeling before the garishly-coloured figures.
    Some buy lottery tickets, and run their hands along the trunk of a fallen ironwood tree, festooned with coloured scarves and smoothed by years of handling. They believe they can see the winning number in the faded grain of the wood.
    Thais, like many people in South East Asia, are superstitious. But the monks at the temple have found their doll collection growing recently, as people have quietly left behind child-sized figures, known as luk thep, or 'child angels'. The monks have moved them to a small room in a tower, where, like the kuman, they are served the red fizzy drinks they are believed to prefer.
    "Each person has their own beliefs", one of the monks, Phra Prasit Warayan told me, "but the belief in the power of luk thep is very strong. When things go well for the owner, they worship them, but when things turn bad, they abandon them. Because they are afraid of what might happen, they leave them here, because they know we accept them, and the abbot is always careful to put them in an appropriate place."
    The dolls look incongruous in the temple, in their formal children's clothing and with their wide-eyed, Western features. But how did the luk thep craze start? And is it just a continuation of the kuman belief, that inanimate objects can be inhabited by a ghost, or spirit?



    I hoped to find that answer at a dazzling pink house in a gated community in another suburb.
    A chubby, blond doll's head sits on a shrine, next to offerings of food and water. Various other limbs lay drying outside after being given a special cream massage. In one room, two young women sat surrounded by different parts of doll's anatomies, carefully applying nail varnish, nose studs and weaving real human hair into soft, plastic scalps. The dolls are often given yantra - Buddhist tattoos - and are filled with rice, a symbol of prosperity.
    In the next room Mananya Boonmi lovingly brushes the hair of her favourite doll, Pet. She has collected these dolls for fourteen years, but she did not always see them as she does now, as living beings, who will reward their owners with good fortune - as long as they are looked after as if they are a human child. She believes she was one of the earliest believers in luk thep.



    She says she was selling small souvenirs around four years ago, when she had the feeling that one of her dolls, Ploy, was trying to help. She began to treat the doll like a real child, and her business took off. She says she was also able to overcome difficulties she was having raising her son.
    "We can rely on luk thep mentally", she says. "They make us happy, as if they are alive, and we can carry them around with us. I love dressing them up, and talking to them. And if you look after them properly, they will come into your dreams."

    he luk thep craze really took off last year when a few Thai celebrities were seen carrying their dolls with them everywhere, even to expensive restaurants or on flights. As they saw them as near-human, and felt they needed to treat them well to ensure good fortune, they refused to put the dolls in their check-in luggage or in the overhead compartment. They wanted to buy seats for them.
    Last month the airline Thai Smile made headlines by allowing this. But there was a quick change of heart after a consultation with air safety officials. It turns out that the inanimate luk thep are luggage after all, and must be stowed as such. So Mananya says she will no longer fly.
    Mananya now sells the dolls to customers for prices that can exceed $1,000. She holds ceremonies to impart a 'soul' into the dolls, but she does not feel this is the same as the spirit inhabiting kuman. Others have taken their dolls to Buddhist monks for blessings.
    The belief in kuman thong, to give them their full name, dates back hundreds of years. In the old days, practitioners would try to obtain a real dead foetus, bake it dry, and then lacquer and gild it. It was believed to have very strong magical powers, but needed to be carefully fed and clothed.
    There are striking similarities with the pampering some luk thep get, with wealthy owners giving their dolls botox injections or buying them jewellery.



    Professor Attachak Sattayanurak from Chiang Mai University sees strong parallels between the two kinds of dolls. He says that in Thailand there was a surge in demand for objects that might bring better luck in the chaos that followed the end of World War Two. Interest in the kuman tradition increased, although it was obviously necessary to find substitutes for a real foetus.
    "More than 65% of Thai people work in the informal sector", he says. "Their lives are always uncertain. And recently the whole country has been going through a turbulent period. People are looking for comfort, for protection."
    Nine years ago, when Thailand was also under military rule, I witnessed another sudden craze here. This was for an amulet called jatukam, which was first made by a police chief who claimed it had helped him solve difficult cases. Prices for the amulets, which were blessed by one temple in Southern Thailand, soared to astronomical levels.
    At one point an image of the amulet was projected onto Thailand's tallest building. People ascribed all manner of powers to them. Then, just as suddenly, they lost interest, prices collapsed, and today they are more or less forgotten.
    A similar fate may eventually await the luk thep dolls.

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