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  1. #26
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Unfortunately spinning too many plates at the moment to get away from work.
    Fairy 'muff.

    Not missing a whole lot to be honest. Though there are a bunch of old and familiar faces making reappearances this year.

  2. #27
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    Fuck running around in that for a laugh

  3. #28
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    Fuck running around in that for a laugh
    Fuck running, period...




  4. #29
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    Can't their bowler see you?

  5. #30
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Probably not but fuck those guys cos I'd forgotten to take me goggles so could barely see the ball myself!

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Fairy 'muff.

    Not missing a whole lot to be honest. Though there are a bunch of old and familiar faces making reappearances this year.
    I miss the hammocks.... could do with a spot of "breakfast" tbh


  7. #32
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    A friend in CM sent a snapshot of her AQ reader at 940. That’s crazy high.

  8. #33
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    It's all over the shop today... was 400 this morning and now barely nudging 100 where we are.

    There's a pattern forming also. By Thurs evenings it's relatively low, <90, and then it jumps again Fri-Sun

  9. #34
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poppers View Post
    I'll be in CM on Friday.
    Cool.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    A friend in CM sent a snapshot of her AQ reader at 940. That’s crazy high.
    Hold my quarter pounder

  11. #36
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    Oops wrong thread. Thought that was a cholesotrol reading

  12. #37
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    and then it jumps again Fri-Sun
    not to worry - the general is there

    he will order the korean bbq resturants closed and pronounce mission accomplished

  13. #38
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    Funny how all this smog only started after Lulu moved up there with his bike, custom exhaust and motorcycle

  14. #39
    The poster you can trust Luigi's Avatar
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    Actually, the Fino is one of the cleanest bikes around.


    Fookin' Gilbert. Gets blamed for everything round here.

  15. #40
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    Farang Ky Ay's Avatar
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    Tackle smog in a week: PM

    Prayuth came to CM, he ordered to improve the haze situation in the next 7 days... He instructed officials to punish and even fire kamnan and village heads who fail to prevent or extinguish fires.

    Corn crop has been pointed out as a main cause of haze as farmers burn theses fields after harvest (like they would do with any crops, easier and cheaper to burn than compost and plow).
    In the article authorities seems to consider forest fires as a mean to create new fields to grow corn, and thus will address encroachment by banning this corn from the market...(which raise questions on how the can tell a legit corn from a corn issuing from encroached lands).

    The mushroom business seems not to be considered as a significant reason for forest fires which raise question on authorities' assessment of the haze situation, IMO forest fires are in majority linked to mushrooms picking activities than clearing forest lands to create new fields, as it's easier to get caught for encroaching. If authorities were seriously committed to solve the haze situation they would limit/ban mushrooms export and domestic selling...

  16. #41
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    The whole mushroom thing has long been a factor but these days I think it's more of a contributor than a main cause. Going back 10 years or so their was a noticeable haze from the mushroom burn-offs but nowhere near to the scale we're seeing now.

    That can pretty much be traced back to the advent of the commercial farming of maize for animal feed.

    This article from a few years back pretty much sums it all up I think. Published by the Straits Times, not sure why the Nation or BKK Post or other local press haven't picked up on it also...

    Chiang Mai's headache: Corn-fed smoke haze

    PUBLISHED
    MAR 21, 2016, 5:00 AM SGT
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    Haze became serious over past decade when rising corn prices enticed highland farmers to grow the crop

    Tan Hui Yee Thailand Correspondent In Chiang Mai

    It's 32 deg C in Chiang Mai as cars on the highway speed towards an invisible mountain. Doi Suthep, which usually looms over the city, has vanished into the ash-coloured horizon.

    Welcome to smog season. From February to April every year, the mountainous region of northern Thailand turns from tourist magnet to an eye-watering hell as smoke from corn farms being cleared settles into the valleys.
    Amid soaring temperatures, planes are occasionally grounded, while hospitals register a 50 per cent spike in patients with eye and skin allergies, as well as lung and heart ailments, say officials. Locals start watching air pollution readings as well as more homespun indicators.

    "If I can't see Doi Suthep... I don't go anywhere," Chiang Mai's chief provincial health officer, Dr Paisan Thanyawinichkul, tells The Straits Times as he fiddles with his personal bottle of antihistamine eyedrops. "I close the doors and windows."

    There are many culprits behind the filthy air. Private vehicles are one. Chiang Mai's provincial capital may be Thailand's second-largest outside Bangkok, but it still lacks a metro system or equivalent form of public transport. Between 2010 and last year, the number of private cars, lorries and vans registered in the province grew by 53 per cent. Urban sprawl chews up greenery that would otherwise act as a filter.
    Homeowners in this vast, mountainous terrain find it easier to burn their rubbish rather than truck it to a disposal facility hours away.

    Locals set fire to the forests to ferret out wildlife and pick an exotic mushroom, which sprouts from the charred ground. These dark, spherical hed thob are sold by foragers from makeshift roadside kiosks for as much as 1,000 baht (S$39) a kg.

    But the biggest culprit by far is open burning on corn farms, which have steadily expanded in tandem with demand for animal feed.

    According to the Asean Agricultural Commodity Outlook report, maize plantations in Thailand expanded by 77,880ha between 2008 and last year. Yet the 4.6 million tonnes of corn produced last year was only enough to meet about nine-tenths of local demand.

    Corn is a major component of animal feed. It is mixed into fodder for chickens, ducks, cows and even fish either consumed in Asean's second-biggest economy or exported to the rest of the world.

    While northern farmers have long burned their agricultural waste, experts say the haze became serious only over the past decade, when rising corn prices enticed highland smallholders to convert to the crop.

    These farmers either sold their corn to middlemen or directly to Charoen Pokphand (CP) group, a Thai agricultural conglomerate, via contract farming arrangements.

    Corn yielded quick cash because it could be harvested in four months. Plus, CP not only guaranteed the purchase price, but also reduced farmers' outlay by supplying seed and fertiliser, and then deducting their costs from the final payment.

    The crop unfortunately also leaves the same amount of stubble, husk and other residue in weight as it does in corn - all of which is burnt at the end of each harvest.

    Last year, when smog became so severe that the Singapore Armed Forces sent two Chinook helicopters to help fight the fires, CP - which also sources for corn in Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam - was singled out for criticism. It denied responsibility for the haze, but ended farming contracts in Mae Chaem, a particularly notorious "hot spot" in Chiang Mai province.

    One of the farmers cut loose, Mr Chitnarong Chompootan, now sells his corn for 12 baht per kg instead of 16 baht.

    "We were the scapegoats," he laments. "We were only responsible for 20 to 30 per cent of the smoke. The rest comes from elsewhere."

    Indeed, satellite images during this period tend to show similar hot spots raging in Myanmar and Laos, which researchers also attribute to corn farms.

    The price of animal feed corn dipped to an average 9.45 baht per kg last year from 10.51 baht per kg in 2012, according to data from the Thai Feed Mill Association. Yet some farmers have responded by clearing more land for corn.

    "They have to keep expanding their plantation to get the same amount of money," says Dr Nion Sirimongkonlertkul from the Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna, who has been studying the issue for over a decade.
    Air pollution continued to hit unsafe limits in the provinces of Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Phayao and Mae Hong Son this week despite a 60-day burning ban until April 15.
    Medical experts warn of serious long-term health effects if no sustainable solution is found.

    The incidence of cancer of the trachea, bronchus and lung in the north is the highest among all regions, a phenomenon which they suspect is linked to the annual smog.
    Officials are cajoling farmers to turn corn stalks into fertiliser, while Warm Heart Foundation, a Chiang Mai-based, non-governmental organisation, is trying to promote charcoal made from corn residue.
    The farmers, weary of being reproached annually, are open to suggestion.

    "If we have good water supply, we can do longan," says Mr Chitnarong. "What I want is for the government to take good care of the farmers, not just throw us some seeds and go away."
    https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se...fed-smoke-haze

  17. #42
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    It's funny how that Prof hinted at the people who could actually do something, but he couldn't name them.

    So he went with Corn Plantations...

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Probably not but fuck those guys cos I'd forgotten to take me goggles so could barely see the ball myself!
    So your two 4's were sheer swing and hope for the best luck

  19. #44
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    So your two 4's were sheer swing and hope for the best luck
    Pretty much.

    I make up for what I lack in finesse and skill or technique with brute force and I have two shots:

    1. cross-bat slog; and
    2. also cross-bat slog but with slightly less finesse

  20. #45
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Used to be pretty much the same with me, but calling it a 'Pull shot' sounds better

  21. #46
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    Agree that corn is a major factor, as sugar cane is in other areas, as greed and lazyness push farmers to burn their field after harvest...rice culture causes the same problem but as the burning of rice fields occurs at a different period. To talk straight, any non perennial culture (thinking of all crops but fruits orchards and trees grower for wood or latex) will involve massive burning... farmers' fault, control and enforce burning ban and promote compost should be the solution but TiT.
    BTW the authorities' promotion of corn didn't help.

    Concerning forest fires, IMO a small part is linked to creating new fields as there are some controls and culprits could get caught even years later ... While burning for the sake of mushrooms picking leaves no clue. Mushrooms is good money, and as foreign countries' demand is steady there are few chances it stops/reduces without authorities' strong and consistent intervention...but again TiT
    Last edited by Farang Ky Ay; 03-04-2019 at 04:55 PM.

  22. #47
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    ^^I used to but there's just no disguising the agricultural nature of it any more. There's still a ball lodged in the tree next the scorers box at Gymkhana where I deposited it a few years back though. I may lack actual ability but on the odd occasion I do connect it stays hit.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    ^^I used to but there's just no disguising the agricultural nature of it any more. There's still a ball lodged in the tree next the scorers box at Gymkhana where I deposited it a few years back though.
    It's probably sat next to one of my no balls/wides.

  24. #49
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Army employs thousands of troops to fight forest fires in North

    The Royal Thai Army has deployed thousands of troops to reinforce volunteers and forest officials fighting widespread forest fires,which have been sending smog across nine of the country’s upper northern provinces for the past several weeks.

    Four army helicopters have also been deployed to help in easing the haze, in addition to the two Air Force transport planes deployed earlier this month from Phitsanuloke air base.

    The deployment came after Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha flew to Chiang Mai on Tuesday to chair a meeting on tacklingthe persistent haze problem. He instructed that the problem be eased in seven days and ordered a crackdown on arsonists who deliberately set forest fires.

    Army Commander-in-Chief Apirat Kongsompong said yesterday that HM the King and HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn have expressed concern over the forest fires. The army chief said that he had sought cooperation from the US and Australia, which are specialized in forest fire-fighting, and both promised to send teams to train Thai troops.

    Meanwhile, Third Army Region deputy commander Maj-Gen Bancha Duriyapunt said in his Facebook post today that the army had adjusted the operating plan by focusing on high-risk areas in the nine provinces.

    The combined force of troops, volunteers, police and park officials will split into small groups going into high-risk areas to fight forest fires, and to patrol forests to prevent new fires while gathering information which will be used in planning long-term fire preventive plans, he said. Furthermore, the field units must be made up of strong people who can spend at least a week in the forest and resupply points must be set up to support the men on the ground.

    Meanwhile, officials of Mae Pim national park in Muang district of Chiang Rai have asked for donations of water canteens, trekking shoes, face masks and other fire-fighting gear. One of the officials said that the fire-fighting volunteers had to fight fires all day, every day and their shoes have worn out, adding that most of them could not afford new shoes which are suitablefor fire-fighting.


    Mae Pim national park covers about 32,000 hectares of forest straddling Parn, Muang and Mae Jai districts of Chiang Rai.

    https://www.thaipbsworld.com/army-em...ires-in-north/

  25. #50
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    I cannot believe no one has posted this photo


    Thailand's Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha (centre) points a leaf blower at the world's worst quality air in Chiang Mai on Tuesday. (AFP photo)
    https://www.bangkokpost.com/learning...-out-in-7-days
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