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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Poor buggers. All the suffering completely preventable with a modicum of government competency. Bastards.
    In fairness, the airport and control tower was damaged in the quake, and the roads have been jammed up with people either trying to get out or get in, both of which have made getting aid into the area extremely difficult.

    But the biggest problem seems to be deciding who is in charge.

    They really should have just declared martial law and sent the military over to sort things out. Maybe they have.

  2. #27
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post



    This photo, I think is another aspect of the ship in pic#1 of Bobo's, above.
    Seen in the same sequence (this one, then Bobo's aerial view), is quite a stark collusion of images as to the reality on the ground at the moment.

  4. #29
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    Bobo's last pic ^^ is some Road Warrior/Mad Max looking stuff...

  5. #30
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    A lesson to be learnt, perhaps. Outside the box thinking required. Houses should be built, instead of with walls parallel to the beach (and perpendicular to oncoming waves), they should be 45 degrees to the beach thereby offering an angled two walls to any oncoming surge of water.

    I'll keep this idea in mind for when I build my beach house.

  6. #31
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    ^ It's a Tsunami probably knock down the Great Wall of China.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    A lesson to be learnt, perhaps. Outside the box thinking required. Houses should be built
    BTW, Are lessons learnt in a rich country where hurricanes and wildwires come very often?
    So, the houses are constructed again in the same way - by wooden light weight and flammable materials.
    Quite exceptional construction style, hardly seen in other (not so rich) world - even where such disasters are not usual...
    Last edited by Klondyke; 04-10-2018 at 02:00 PM.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo746 View Post




    Made me shudder. I have pictures like that from Khao Lak.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo746 View Post
    ^ It's a Tsunami probably knock down the Great Wall of China.
    Possibly, especially since it would be square-on to the incoming surge and the water has nowhere to go but onwards. But give the water a place to go of lesser obstruction and a house might not fall. I daresay a dome is the safest for facing both tsunami and hurricane, and a house built at an angle to any water surge has more potential to survive than a house built square-on.

    Just my idea and I could be wrong. But to me it raises the chances of surviving considerably. And so that's how I'll build my beach house

  10. #35
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    Nice theory.. So do you now see the destruction? I hope so and I think you too would want out. No wait you would thrive in a situation like that. Once again good on the Thai government for providing flights to evacuate the Thai citizens living there.

    lets see now uh oh a crack....


  11. #36
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    There is a third town involved now Palu , Donggala and S???

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Nice theory.. So do you now see the destruction? I hope so and I think you too would want out. No wait you would thrive in a situation like that. Once again good on the Thai government for providing flights to evacuate the Thai citizens living there.

    lets see now uh oh a crack....

    You're a harping old weirdo. If you read the report (post #8 on this thread) you'd have known the Thais were safe and in a safe area of the island. It's a big island. No need to go back to Thailand at taxpayer's expense.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    There is a third town involved now Palu , Donggala and S???
    Sigi Biromaru?

    It's just outside Palu.

  14. #39
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    At least 5,000 People Believed Missing After Quakes, Tsunami on Indonesian Island

    Updated at 12:33 p.m. ET on 2018-10-07


    An estimated 5,000 people were believed to be missing in two villages where homes were swallowed by a devastating earthquake in Indonesia’s Sulawesi island, national disaster officials announced Sunday as they dramatically revised the number of victims unaccounted for nine days later.


    At least 1,763 people were killed in twin temblors and a tsunami that struck the area on Sept. 28, said the National Disaster Management Agency, which was working to verify reports that some 5,000 residents of Balaroa and Petobo – villages located on the outskirts of Palu, in Central Sulawesi province – were still missing in the disaster’s wake.


    “The 5,000 figure is based on information from village chiefs. Exactly how many, we don’t know,” agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho told a news conference in Jakarta.


    “It has to be verified. It could be that they have sought refuge elsewhere,” he added.


    The two villages were obliterated by the disaster, with witnesses reporting that houses were swallowed by mud and dislodged by hundreds of meters.


    The National Search and Rescue Agency, a different agency, had estimated earlier that more than 1,000 people were missing in Petobo alone, after the soil there turned to liquid during one of the earthquakes through a phenomenon known to geologists as soil liquefaction.


    Sutopo said the government had set Oct. 11 – this coming Thursday – as a deadline for completing post-disaster search operations.


    But when asked whether the operation to search for survivors or bodies would end on that date, Sutopo replied, “not stopped. It is hoped that the search can be completed on Oct. 11.”



    A woman holds a stuffed rabbit after it was found at her destroyed home, where she said she had lost her three children in earthquakes and a tsunami that battered Palu, in Indonesia’s Central Sulawesi province, Oct. 7, 2018. [Reuters]





    However, Wiranto, Indonesia’s security minister, said the government was considering ending search-and-recovery operations in the Petobo and Balaroa areas by declaring them as mass graves and leaving them untouched.


    “We have to make a decision as to when the search for the dead will end. Then, we later must decide when the area will be designated a mass grave,” Agence France-Presse quoted him as telling reporters late on Friday, adding that government officials had been discussing the possibility with local leaders and clergy.


    On Sunday, Muhammad Syaugi, the chief of the National Search and Rescue Agency indicated that hopes were fading for finding more survivors.


    “This is day ten. It would be a miracle to actually find someone still alive,” he told AFP.



    Local businesses stir back to life


    Meanwhile, a semblance of normalcy returned to Palu on Sunday, as shops and gas stations reopened and electricity was restored to much of the capital of Central Sulawesi.


    Matahari, a major national retail chain, was offering a 50 percent discount on products as it opened its doors to customers. Shop attendants wore bright red shirts and welcomed visitors with big smiles.


    “Our facilities were badly damaged but we have been trying to reopen our businesses to speed up Palu’s recovery,” said James Riyadi, chief executive of the Lippo Group, which operates Matahari, the Siloam Hospital and other businesses in the area.


    Several traditional markets, grocery shops and mom-and-pop stalls had also reopened.


    Shops selling mobile phones and construction materials were attracting buyers as survivors of the disaster started to rebuild their lives.


    “It seems that the economy is running again in Palu because the shops are open,” Dika Winata, a South Palu resident, told BenarNews.


    Tauhid Wijaya, another local, said some shops were selling goods at higher than usual prices.


    “I just bought a bottle water and it’s 3,000 rupiah [19 U.S. cents] more expensive than before,” he said. “It’s expected because of the situation. People will still buy anyway.”


    A shop owner in South Palu, Jaka Marten, said he had reopened his business two days ago.


    “Business has been brisk. Customers just keep coming,” he said.

    Motorists were also flocking to gas stations in parts of the city.

    “Thank God there are no long queues. We fill up as soon as we come,” said Muhammad Sigit, 26.

    “Fuel isn’t rationed anymore so we can buy as much as we want,” he said.

    The state-run electricity company, PT PLN, said all seven of its substations in Palu, Sigi and Donggala regencies, which were damaged in the disaster, had been repaired.

    “Right now we are focusing on fixing all power infrastructure in Donggala, but it will be gradual because access is still difficult,” said Syamsul Huda, PLN’s business director for Sulawesi.
    East Palu resident Adriansyah, 29, who had been forced to live in a temporary shelter after the disaster, said that he and his family had moved back into their home after the power was restored.

    “There have been two outages today, maybe they are still fixing things,” he told BenarNews.




    Rescuers stand beside a toppled mosque in the earthquake-hit Balaroa neighbourhood of Palu, Central Sulawesi, Oct. 6, 2018. [AP]




    International relief effort


    Meanwhile, foreign aid was pouring into disaster-stricken zones of Sulawesi. At least 10 countries – including the United States, Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, Britain, France and Germany – have sent search-and-rescue teams or provided military cargo planes to assist Indonesia in the recovery efforts.


    On Friday, the American government announced an additional $3.6 million in humanitarian assistance to Indonesia to help people affected by the disaster.


    The funding brought the total American aid package to $3.7 million, USAID spokesperson Clayton McCleskey said.


    The U.S. Agency for International Development was airlifting 2,210 rolls of heavy-duty plastic sheeting from its emergency warehouses in Dubai and Malaysia, enough to provide 110,500 people with temporary shelter, McCleskey said.


    A team of disaster experts from USAID was also in Indonesia to assess damage and work with local authorities and humanitarian organizations, he said.


    The latest natural disaster to hit Indonesia occurred almost two months after a series of powerful temblors devastated Lombok island, killing at least 555 people.

    Indonesia straddles the so-called Ring of Fire, an area in the Pacific Ocean basin known for seismic upheavals and volcanic eruptions.

    On Dec. 26, 2004, about 130,000 people died in Indonesia’s westernmost province of Aceh when a magnitude-9.1 earthquake struck off the west coast of Sumatra, unleashing a series of devastating tsunamis. As a result, at least 230,000 people were killed in a dozen Asian countries.


    https://www.benarnews.org/english/ne...018110848.html

  15. #40
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Students Return to School in Indonesia’s Quake-Stricken Sulawesi

    Education officials began the grim task of figuring out how many children would be coming back to class as students started returning to their schools on Monday, 10 days after a massive earthquake and tsunami battered Indonesia’s Sulawesi island.

    Rescuers have recovered 1,948 bodies of people who were killed in the magnitude-7.4 quake and tsunami on Sept. 28, Willem Rampangilei, chairman of the National Disaster Management Agency, told reporters.


    “I don’t want to be absent from classes for too long, especially because I’m in the final year,” Aisya, a student at the state-run SMAN 4 senior high school in the provincial capital Palu, told BenarNews.


    She said she received a WhatsApp message asking her to come to school even though there were no classes.


    “Many teachers and students were affected by the disaster. Some may have left Palu,” said Syam Zaini, the school’s principal.


    As of Monday the official number of missing people stood at 835, Rampangilei said. But other officials estimated that 5,000 people were unaccounted for and may have been buried in villages where houses were swallowed by torrents of mud in a process called liquefaction, in which the temblor turned water-logged soil into quicksand.


    Teachers and students asked each other whether their families were safe. Some children came without wearing their compulsory uniforms.


    At one elementary school, no pupil or teacher showed up. The building near the coast was badly damaged by the tsunami and was covered in mud.


    At another school in Palu, principal Kasiludin said authorities told all teachers to show up for work, beginning on Monday, to count the number of students.


    “We won’t force the students to come back because many are traumatized,” he told Reuters news agency. “But we must start again soon to keep their spirits up and so they don’t fall behind.”


    At least seven students and one teacher from the school died, he said.


    Across the city, nine schools were destroyed, 22 teachers were killed and 14 were missing, according to the disaster agency. At the SMP Negeri 15 Palu middle school, fewer than 50 of its 697 students showed up, it said.



    From neighborhoods to memorial parks


    Rampangilei said the government expected to end the emergency search operation on Thursday, amid fading hopes of finding any more survivors.


    “The emergency response period will end on Oct. 11 and whether this will be extended will depend on the local capability and capacity to care for the displaced and other people affected,” he said.


    “We will evaluate and we’ll discuss this with the local government, because they are the ones who will decide, whether it needs to be extended,” he added.


    Rampangilei said the local government should discuss the plan to end the search with community leaders.


    “What should be considered is that there are many bodies buried in those locations and it’s been 14 days,” he said.


    “Our main consideration is health. We should not create new health problems,” he said.


    The government of Central Sulawesi province said that three areas – Balaroa, Petobo and Jono Oge – where houses were swallowed when the ground became like quicksand – would be turned into memorial parks.


    “Monuments will be built in those locations and at the end of the emergency response period there will be a mass prayer gathering,” it said.


    Also on Monday, rescuers called off the search at Hotel Roa-Roa, according to the news agency AFP.


    The hotel emerged as an early focus of efforts to extract survivors, with seven people pulled alive from its ruins in the immediate aftermath. Rescuers said 27 bodies were recovered from the 80-room hotel, including three pulled from the debris on Sunday.


    Among the confirmed dead were five paragliders who came to Palu for a competition, including an Asian Games athlete and a South Korean, the only known foreign victim in the disaster, AFP said.



    Returning to work


    Civil servants also began returning to work in Palu, a coastal city of about 374,000 people, and other affected areas such as Sigi and Donggala regencies.


    Some residents were applying for new identification cards at the Population and Civil Registry Office in Palu.


    “My wallet was gone, along with my ID card during the earthquake,” Irfan, one of the applicants, told BenarNews after having his photograph and fingerprints taken.


    Arief Edie, an official at the Home Affairs Ministry, said the government would make it easy for residents affected by the disaster to obtain new ID cards, family records and death certificates.

    “The government is present to provide public services,” he said, adding that people would not be charged.


    At the provincial health office, civil servants have started doing administrative work.


    “Most of the civil servants were badly affected, but about 40 percent of the staff have returned to work,” provincial health chief Reni Lamajino said.


    “About 70 percent of community health clinics (Puskesmas) have been activated,” she said.


    Meanwhile, dozens of victims have been treated at the KRI Dr Soeharso 990, an Indonesian naval hospital ship, which has docked at Palu’s Pantoloan port since last week.


    The ship, which has 40 beds, has 93 medical personnel, Antara news agency reported.


    The head of the provincial social affairs department, Ridwan Mumu, said the government had begun discussing the idea of turning the three villages into monuments and open green spaces.


    “One thing is for sure, there have been suggestions that there should be no settlements,” he said.

    Ridwan said survivors whose relatives were believed buried there should let them go.

    “This is all for public good. We should not insist on continuing the search under the current circumstances,” he said.


    Aid has been pouring into the region, including from foreign countries, but it had not reached some of the more remote areas. Officials said helicopters had been running supply drops to more isolated areas outside Palu.


    The search continued on Monday, with six more bodies found in Balaroa, said Iwan Setiawan Abbas, who led the search effort in the area.


    “Yesterday we found 15 bodies and the previous day 28 bodies,” Abbas said, as he surveyed a tangled mess of concrete and steel bars.


    https://www.benarnews.org/english/ne...018173231.html

  16. #41
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  17. #42
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    Lot of people in Bali a bit scared after a 6.0 offshore shook them up last night. No damage but the rumour mill there is as bad as Thailand and all it takes is some arsehole starting a rumour a "big one" is coming and they're shitting it.

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