Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 64
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755

    Pakistan Has a New Prime Minister

    Imran Khan’s Historic Victory Should Pave The Way For an ASEAN-Pakistan Free Trade Agreement





    "Pakistan’s Prime Minister designate Imran Khan is coming into office with the wind of mass popular support behind his back and also the weight of history on his shoulders. Many of the major issues ranging from long term sustainable poverty relief, to improved education across Pakistan’s provinces and strengthening important foreign alliances while working to end hostilities with traditional adversaries, formed key elements of Imran Khan’s widely praised victory speech. But there was one important issue that Imran Khan did not specifically mention and this is the all important area of trade. New trade agreements with new partners will ultimately be of extreme importance to insuring Pakistan’s road to moderate prosperity.

    ASEAN-Pakistan: A free trade agreement right for today and fit for the future

    The Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) is among the most diverse, dynamic and economically growing geopolitical blocks in the world. As a free trading zone, ASEAN member states are able to trade more easily among each other while the collective weight of ASEAN allows the bloc to negotiate trade agreements with other major economies. At present, ASEAN has free trading agreements with China, Japan, South Korea, India, Australia and New Zealand.

    A new ASEAN-Pakistan free trading agreement would not only allow Pakistan to export its own goods and raw materials to an ever diverse and expanding south east Asian market but most importantly, an ASEAN-Pakistan free trading agreement would pave the way for good future relations between a major south Asian nation and an ASEAN bloc whose economic fortunes will likely mutually accelerate over the next years and decades.

    In this sense, while free trading agreements are often conducted between countries and blocs that have reached a critical mass in terms of development goals, in the age of win-win cooperation between nations and blocs of the wider developing world, it is becoming increasingly important for developing nations to aid one another by trading more freely even long before attaining goals of moderate domestic prosperity. This is the case because trading with mutually developing nations can help to accelerate economic growth and human development by allowing for the comparatively easy access of domestic producers to crucial foreign goods, services and raw materials that are essential for one’s own developmental needs.

    Furthermore, such an atmosphere helps to bring the economies of various nations closer together in terms not only of service exchange but in terms of mutual exchanges in expertise. Thus, while the model of a major economic power helping a materially poorer partner to accelerate sustainable economic growth will continue to be a vital model across Asia, it remains the case that nations at more similar stages of their development can actually provide for one another in similar ways based on a win-win model of pooling the goods and human talents of economically growing nations in order to strengthen each side.

    Finally and perhaps most importantly, when the major nations of ASEAN all become moderately prosperous societies (Singapore for example attained this status decades ago) and Pakistan moves closer to the same goal, there will already be a free trading agreement in place to ensure continued economic connectivity later in the 21st century when the ASEAN economies and Pakistan’s economy are likely to be vastly larger and more vibrant than they are today. By establishing contacts in the form of a free trading agreement today, it will ensure a more harmonious mutual growth pattern in the long term future for all parties to such an agreement.

    The India factor

    As party of New Delhi’s “act east” strategy, India has already secured a free trading agreement with ASEAN. While modern economies throughout the world look to embrace free trade versus protectionism on a non-ideological basis, India’s interests in south east Asia are motivated by a deeply zero-sum mentality in trying to cut China out of partnerships in the region. In Myanmar for example at the height of the conflict in the country’s Rakhine state, India appeared to be openly competing with China to see which country could be a more important partner of Naypyidaw at a time when the west began deserting Myanmar en masse.

    While Indian Premier Narendra Modi conducted a well choreographed visit to Myanmar in 2017, it was ultimately a Chinese authored proposal to bring peace to Rakhine through cooperation between Myanmar and Bangladesh – one offered with hardly any fanfare or public warning, that has been able to gradually calm the situation which itself was an outgrowth of Myanmar’s long running civil conflict.

    The significance of last year’s Sino-Indian “competition” for Myanmar is instructive to Pakistan on several levels. First of all, it demonstrated that while India has emulated America’s model of turning every peace agreement or bilateral agreement into a Hollywood/Bollywood spectacle, China prefers a more businesslike approach that focuses more on the results than on promoting the process.

    Here, ironically, Pakistan could learn from its rival India in so far as many in ASEAN seem to look at China, Japan and India in terms of considering new trade deals to the north without considering other countries to the north of ASEAN including Russia, the central Asian republics and of course Pakistan.

    In this sense, it would be to Pakistan’s supreme benefit to conduct an outreach programme with ASEAN that borrows some of the overt showmanship of India but with the ability to guarantee Chinese style businesslike results. One of the key elements of One Belt–One Road is that China can now offer the ASEAN countries to its south the ability to trade with western Eurasia, Africa and Europe owing to the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) which acts as the main artery connecting China’s Pacific coasts with Pakistan’s Gwadar Port on the Arabian Sea.

    Complimenting China while introducing oneself to southern neighbours

    There is absolutely no reason why Pakistan cannot launch a campaign within ASEAN states to promote Gwadar and CPEC as a clear alternative to existing trade routes for ASEAN nations, including the often fraught Strait of Malacca. By promoting Pakistani products and services while welcoming ASEAN products to Pakistan’s markets, CPEC could be transformed from a project rarely discussed in the ASEAN press to one that becomes a source of economic and geopolitical attraction for ASEAN states.

    In this sense, China would clearly welcome its partner Pakistan in taking on the added responsibility of ensuring that CPEC reaches its maximum potential in the shortest amount of time. Furthermore, as a nation that received independence around the same time that many ASEAN nations broke free of British, French, Dutch and American rule, Pakistan can help China to counter the largely Indian and US narrative that because China was never formally colonised in totality, it somehow cannot relate to the countries that were fully colonised by European aggressors in the late modern period.

    India has often spread propaganda in the region that because China became weakened by western and Japanese aggression in the 19th and 20th century but never became a colony, that somehow China is aggressive towards countries that only became independent in the middle of the 20th century. This devious narrative is automatically picked up by Sinosceptics in ASEAN, thus cutting ASEAN off from great potential partnerships.

    As a country that has struggled to gain independence at a time when many ASEAN states began their anti-colonial struggles, Pakistan is well placed to challenge India’s Sinophobic post-colonial narrative while simultaneously reminding ASEAN that while India portrays itself in the ASEAN press as an innocent post colonial power that is geopolitically ‘at one with the people’, for millions of Kashmiris and their fraternal Pakistani friends, India is both a post colonial independent state and an aggressor. If Pakistan were able to show that there is more than one side to south Asia among ASEAN nations often cut-off from the realities of recent south Asian history, China would see that Pakistan is able of complimenting Beijing’s win-win strategy in ways not previously foreseen.

    Sending both an economic and geopolitical message to the United States

    One of the major themes of Imran Khan’s campaign was fierce criticism of the paralytic attitude that the old political elites of the country took to the United States. One of the reasons underscoring Imran Khan’s victory was the fact that he campaigned for Pakistan to develop a dignified, non-aligned and truly independent foreign policy that would be able to engage and appropriately react to the United States in ways other than subservience and confusion.

    By taking the initiative in opening up trade with ASEAN, a bloc with as many if not more US partners as Chinese partners – Pakistan would be able to show the US that it should be treated more like Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines or Cambodia than like Afghanistan. In all of the aforementioned ASEAN states, the US is openly competing with China for economic influence and in each case even among traditional US partners, there are strong cases being made in China’s long term economic favour. This has caused the US to inadvertently try harder to persuade ASEAN nations to see the US as an economic partner rather than a neo-colonial overlord — an image the US is trying to shake even while often enforcing this stereotype.

    Even the DPRK is now being openly courted by the US, China and Russia simultaneously based on a unique outgrowth of the strategies that have long been used by the major Pacific powers in the ASEAN bloc. Pakistan needs to teach the United States a lesson in respect and recent trends show that only by taking the initiative to engage in economic relationships not reliant on the US, does Washington sit up, take notice and realise that zero-sum strategies will no longer work against a nation diversifying its geopolitical portfolio.

    Conclusion

    Pakistan has nothing to lose and potentially very much to gain by establishing a free trading relationship with ASEAN. In summary such an agreement can achieve the following:

    –Accelerated development through a mutual partnership with a group of largely developing nations with rapidly growing economies

    –Help create a cooperative atmosphere where mechanical, technological and research exchange can transpire on a win-win basis

    –Set the stage for a long-term free trading area among nations on the road to moderate prosperity in the 21st century

    –Help off-set India’s anti-China and de-facto anti-Pakistan strategy in the region

    –Put Pakistan on the intellectual and economic map of ASEAN leaders who too often only see Japan, China and India as important northern neighbours

    –Help to leverage US economic threats by showing a profound independent streak which includes partnerships with many US allies in Asia

    https://www.eurasiafuture.com/2018/0...ade-agreement/
    Attached Images Attached Images
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  2. #2
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    ตะพานหิน
    Posts
    5,134
    Free Trade.....?

  3. #3
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:46 AM
    Posts
    53,823
    His lifespan just shortened.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    Imran Khan Election Manifesto 2018 PTI Manifesto




    Imran Khan addresses 11 points on 29th April 2018 as Election Manifestos for coming elections 2018. Elections manifesto is the published verbal declaration of view of the issuer, motive or intentions of a person or a political party. It is considered as the public opinion to promote a new idea for carrying out change. PTI Election Manifesto 2018 has addressed by the Chairman of PTI in Lahore. Imran Khan Election Manifesto 2018 comprises upon 11 points for new Pakistan where justice would be the prime right of everyone, the single educational syllabus will be for rich and poor, the healthcare system will be improved, national investment will be increased and where tourism will be promoted. In Imran Khan 11 point Agenda in Lahore 2018, he also talked about the poor farmers and promised to work for the farmers so that they will get fair wages. In this article, you will learn about Imran Khan Election Manifesto.

    1: Education:

    Education is the prime motive of PTI. The party believes in the uniform educational syllabus which is both for poor and rich. There will not discriminate in the educational system, said by the chairman of PTI Imran Khan.

    2: Healthcare:

    The second point of Imran Khan Election manifesto 2018 is healthcare. The Chairman of PTI said he will build world’s best hospitals in Pakistan to fulfill the basic healthcare needs of nations. He also elaborated that if he can build SKMCH hospital without having in power, so what would he do when he will come in power.

    3: Tax Reform:

    In Pakistan mostly businessmen and landlord do not pay taxes due to poor taxation department. Tax reform is the third point in PTI Manifesto 2018, in which Imran Khan said that he will strengthen the FBR to collect taxes.

    4: Corruption:

    Corruption would be eliminated from Pakistan if we want prosperity. Every matter should be done on merit and corrupt people should be eliminated from the system. He also said that he is not corrupt and doesn’t like corruption at all.

    5: Investment:

    PTI Election Manifesto 2018 5th point is the investment. According to the Chairman of PTI, Industries will be strengthened in Pakistan so foreign investors could be attracted. He said he will increase foreign investment in Pakistan by ends and means.

    6: Employment:

    He also said that he will provide jobs to the unemployed persons in Pakistan. He will provide the better career opportunities to youngsters. In this point, Imran Khan said, he will build more than 50 lac houses for the poor. Shelter is one of the basic need of human and in this point he is talking about providing own houses to poor.

    6a: Tourism:

    Tourism is great source of foreign investment in Pakistan. Pakistan should welcome tourists because they are the great source of income. Tourism is also one of the 11 points of Imran Khan Manifesto 2018.

    7: Agriculture:

    Agriculture is also core motive of PTI. In PTI Election Manifesto 2018, Chairman of PTI said that he will strengthen the agriculture field so at least fair wages should be paid to the labors who work hard in the field from dawn to dusk to produce corps.

    8: Strengthen the Federation:

    Provinces will be empowered in PTI’s tenure. He will not only promote federation but also takes some serious steps like he will announce southern province on the administrative basis and will merge Tribal areas with Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    9: Environment:

    Imran Khan Said, the environment was their election manifesto priority in previous government in KPK, as they planted 10million trees. He said Lahore has become the most polluted city of Pakistan which is very regretful.

    10: Justice:

    PTI Chairman stressed upon justice and judiciary system. He said that he will make Punjab police as he made KPK police. He will make the judiciary system like KPK because there is not a single case proceed more than one year in KPK.

    11: Women Empowerment:

    In this point of Imran Khan Election manifesto 2018, he said that he will educate the women and will protect the inheritance rights of them.

    These are the PTI Election Manifesto 2018 addressed by the Chairman of PTI Imran Khan. Imran Khan Election Manifesto 2018 is clear and based on the basic rights of the public.


    https://sekho.com.pk/pakistan/imran-...ion-manifesto/
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    On a walkabout
    Loy Toy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Last Online
    Today @ 10:49 AM
    Posts
    27,962
    A great cricketer!


  • #6
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,647
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Imran Khan Election Manifesto 2018 PTI Manifesto




    Imran Khan addresses 11 points on 29th April 2018 as Election Manifestos for coming elections 2018. Elections manifesto is the published verbal declaration of view of the issuer, motive or intentions of a person or a political party. It is considered as the public opinion to promote a new idea for carrying out change. PTI Election Manifesto 2018 has addressed by the Chairman of PTI in Lahore. Imran Khan Election Manifesto 2018 comprises upon 11 points for new Pakistan where justice would be the prime right of everyone, the single educational syllabus will be for rich and poor, the healthcare system will be improved, national investment will be increased and where tourism will be promoted. In Imran Khan 11 point Agenda in Lahore 2018, he also talked about the poor farmers and promised to work for the farmers so that they will get fair wages. In this article, you will learn about Imran Khan Election Manifesto.

    1: Education:

    Education is the prime motive of PTI. The party believes in the uniform educational syllabus which is both for poor and rich. There will not discriminate in the educational system, said by the chairman of PTI Imran Khan.

    2: Healthcare:

    The second point of Imran Khan Election manifesto 2018 is healthcare. The Chairman of PTI said he will build world’s best hospitals in Pakistan to fulfill the basic healthcare needs of nations. He also elaborated that if he can build SKMCH hospital without having in power, so what would he do when he will come in power.

    3: Tax Reform:

    In Pakistan mostly businessmen and landlord do not pay taxes due to poor taxation department. Tax reform is the third point in PTI Manifesto 2018, in which Imran Khan said that he will strengthen the FBR to collect taxes.

    4: Corruption:

    Corruption would be eliminated from Pakistan if we want prosperity. Every matter should be done on merit and corrupt people should be eliminated from the system. He also said that he is not corrupt and doesn’t like corruption at all.

    5: Investment:

    PTI Election Manifesto 2018 5th point is the investment. According to the Chairman of PTI, Industries will be strengthened in Pakistan so foreign investors could be attracted. He said he will increase foreign investment in Pakistan by ends and means.

    6: Employment:

    He also said that he will provide jobs to the unemployed persons in Pakistan. He will provide the better career opportunities to youngsters. In this point, Imran Khan said, he will build more than 50 lac houses for the poor. Shelter is one of the basic need of human and in this point he is talking about providing own houses to poor.

    6a: Tourism:

    Tourism is great source of foreign investment in Pakistan. Pakistan should welcome tourists because they are the great source of income. Tourism is also one of the 11 points of Imran Khan Manifesto 2018.

    7: Agriculture:

    Agriculture is also core motive of PTI. In PTI Election Manifesto 2018, Chairman of PTI said that he will strengthen the agriculture field so at least fair wages should be paid to the labors who work hard in the field from dawn to dusk to produce corps.

    8: Strengthen the Federation:

    Provinces will be empowered in PTI’s tenure. He will not only promote federation but also takes some serious steps like he will announce southern province on the administrative basis and will merge Tribal areas with Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

    9: Environment:

    Imran Khan Said, the environment was their election manifesto priority in previous government in KPK, as they planted 10million trees. He said Lahore has become the most polluted city of Pakistan which is very regretful.

    10: Justice:

    PTI Chairman stressed upon justice and judiciary system. He said that he will make Punjab police as he made KPK police. He will make the judiciary system like KPK because there is not a single case proceed more than one year in KPK.

    11: Women Empowerment:

    In this point of Imran Khan Election manifesto 2018, he said that he will educate the women and will protect the inheritance rights of them.

    These are the PTI Election Manifesto 2018 addressed by the Chairman of PTI Imran Khan. Imran Khan Election Manifesto 2018 is clear and based on the basic rights of the public.


    https://sekho.com.pk/pakistan/imran-...ion-manifesto/
    Won't be holding my breath.

  • #7
    Thailand Expat
    reddog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Last Online
    Today @ 11:26 AM
    Posts
    1,087
    Like Jabir says,i won't hold mt breath either,nothing about easing tensions with India or stopping military support for Terrorists.
    Hope he does not start blaspheming,he stated he would not repel the law.

  • #8
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    I find it useful to remember what politicians are elected on. It will be something to judge his success or failure by.

    Will he look East of West for guidance?

    Will Imran Khan pivot Pakistan from US to China?

    "By Daniel Hyatt Source:Global Times Published: 2018/7/29 1840



    Imran Khan is now Pakistan's most powerful man. Poised to become prime minister of the South Asian nation within a couple of days, he has left little to speculate in unveiling a relationship road map with China.

    A day after the electoral process was completed, resulting in Khan's party emerging as the single largest, Khan appeared on television screens across the nation to speak for the first time.

    The first foreign country he mentioned in his address wasn't predicted by many. China, the largest foreign direct investor, running the Belt and Road flagship project and the most dependable ally of Pakistan, was also the only country the new leader talked of taking lessons from.

    Elections this year in Pakistan were held under the shadow of former prime minister Nawaz Sharif's conviction. Sitting behind bars, he is serving a 10-year sentence, pending appeal, for corruption.

    In the opposition before this election, Khan was a strong critic of Sharif and his handling of Chinese investments. He accused Sharif of using Chinese projects to expand his family business - a charge seen by many as his opposition to investments from Pakistan's closest neighbor.

    In 2014 when the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) was gaining ground in Pakistan, Imran Khan and his followers were engaged in a 4-month-long sit-in in the capital Islamabad. The protest kept countless stakeholders of the mega project on edge.

    The cricketer-turned-politician subsequently had to explain on various occasions, even during meetings with Chinese diplomats, that he was neither against Chinese projects nor the CPEC.

    He stated, instead, that he was pressing for transparency in investments which the Nawaz government was allegedly trying hard to avoid.

    Much later when the protests were called off and preparations for elections started, Imran Khan announced his own plan to pull Pakistan out of its woes. For reviving the economy, he proposed the Chinese model. He wanted to make use of Chinese conventions in pulling millions of Pakistanis out of poverty.

    Released two weeks before the recent polls, his party's General Election Manifesto was the first documented road map that revealed what Khan exactly had for the Belt and Road initiative.

    The document regarded the CPEC as a game changer which held great potential for Pakistan to benefit from. It planned utilization of the trade infrastructure established by the CPEC and the Belt and Road initiative to promote an "indigenous resource-focused growth strategy."

    The manifesto also suggested the employment of expertise from China in supplementing domestic manufacturing and enhancing agricultural produce.

    Despite a barrage of criticism he threw at Sharif's handling of Chinese investments, Khan is not a skeptic of the projects themselves. The manifesto highlights that the CPEC will be completed with more focus on partnerships and joint ventures rather than Pakistan's high dependence on import of goods and services.

    His party has vowed to ensure participation of Pakistani businessmen in culminating CPEC projects.

    In Pakistan's electoral system, political parties take lesser risks as they near the polls. But Imran Khan minced no words when his exclusive interview was published in Guangming Daily two days before the elections.

    Khan asserted that the CPEC will receive wide support from all sectors of Pakistani society. He expected a firm guarantee of medium- to long-term implementation of the corridor and talked about an "irreplaceable role" of the CPEC in generating employment. He acknowledged China as the largest investor in Pakistan and CPEC as a platform which will attract more foreign investment. He also laid stress on cooperation with China in clean energy, green agriculture and industry. He believed that the historical friendship between Pakistan and China was the basis of future cooperation.

    Imran Khan's politico-economic views do not seem to be influenced by his Western education. He questions the practicality of capitalist economic policies. He is also a strong critic of US President Donald Trump, the US and US-led wars. In his latest address, he vowed to establish a balanced relationship with the US as against the current one being dominated by the US.

    Imran Khan's plan is a clear pivot by Pakistan, away from the US orbit and further into the Chinese bloc.

    His willingness to ensure the completion of the Belt and Road flagship project, his determination to cooperate with China, and his pledge to revise lopsided relations with the US at least clarify one thing from the haze of Pakistani elections - that China has a friend in Imran Khan.

    The author is a Pakistan-based freelance journalist and commentator."

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    He said he will increase foreign investment in Pakistan by ends and means.
    Will he accept IMF/western loans with:

    a. X% interest
    b. Political management
    c. Enforced economic conditions
    d. Military management

    or Chinese/BRI loans with:

    a. 0.5 x% interest
    b. -
    c. -
    d. -

    Or is it an opportunity for the UK to seal a trade deal, to replace the EU ?

  • #9
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    China's $2 Billion Pakistan Loan Shows Desire to Keep Khan Close

    Iain Marlow, Peter Martin and Kamran Haider
    August 2, 2018, 4:00 AM GMT+7




    If there were any doubts about China’s intent to keep ties close with its all-weather ally Pakistan, Beijing demolished them with a reported $2 billion loan just days after the election of a new Pakistani premier.

    While cricketing legend Imran Khan attempts to form a coalition government, China has stepped up to reinforce a geopolitical alliance that shapes the South Asian nation’s policies toward the U.S. and India. The announcement caused Pakistan’s rupee to jump the most in nearly a decade as Khan takes power with an economy in chaos.

    The gesture speaks to Pakistan’s overwhelming reliance on China as a source of financial, diplomatic and military support at a time when U.S. President Donald Trump has cut military aid to Islamabad. Ultimately, Khan may not have a choice. Pakistan’s powerful military has continued to push its civilian counterparts for close ties with China in order to ensure the flow of more than $60 billion in loans for the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor infrastructure projects.

    “There is a deep, far-reaching political consensus in Pakistan for a continued strong partnership with Beijing,” said Michael Kugelman, a senior associate for South Asia at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington. “This is especially true now, with Pakistan’s relationship with America facing an uncertain future.”

    Closer to China

    Khan and his Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, or Movement for Justice, won the most seats in an election last week that was marred by allegations of military interference. Like China, Khan acted quickly to send a public message.

    “Our neighbor is China, we will further strengthen our relations with it,” Khan said as he declared victory in a televised statement. “The CPEC project which China started in Pakistan will give us chance to bring in investment to Pakistan.”

    Speaking at a regular press briefing on July 30, Geng Shuang, a spokesman for China’s foreign ministry said China welcomed the new government. Khan “will likely try to balance the U.S. and China, but China and Pakistan are mutually dependent," said Wang Yiwei, director of Renmin University’s Institute of International Affairs in Beijing. "He won’t be able to change that.”

    All-Weather Friends

    While China was initially focused on former premier Nawaz Sharif’s Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz, or PML-N, Beijing has “diversified its contacts and investments” in Pakistan, said Dhruva Jaishankar, a foreign policy fellow at Brookings India. At the same time, Pakistan’s military -- which has ruled the country outright for much of its 71-year history -- defines the country’s policy toward CPEC projects.

    Khan “does not have a lot of wiggle room,” Jaishankar said. “We may continue to see a gradual trend of Pakistan drifting closer to China and more distant from the United States. But that would have to do with a number of factors beyond Imran Khan’s election.”

    Indeed, the political consensus on China is especially important now, said Kugelman. “Pakistan needs powerful friends, and China is one of the few that Islamabad can depend on -- Khan knows this, and he’ll do what’s necessary to ensure that the China-Pakistan relationship remains strong,” he said.

    China Debt

    One of the most crucial tasks ahead of Khan is Pakistan’s ailing economy, which analysts say is likely to push Pakistan toward yet another International Monetary Fund bailout.

    Over the weekend, Karachi’s Express Tribune newspaper, citing unnamed finance ministry officials, reported that Beijing authorized a $2 billion loan to help Islamabad weather the economic crisis. The Islamic Development Bank, a multilateral lender based in Saudi Arabia, also activated a three-year $4.5 billion oil-financing facility, the paper said. A finance ministry spokesman didn’t respond to calls or messages seeking comment on Tuesday.

    The amount of Chinese loans given to Pakistan over the last 13 months alone comes close to the IMF’s last loan of $6.2 billion. Those vast debts to China have prompted worries from U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who told CNBC that he would be watching to see if Khan’s new government uses IMF funds to pay off Chinese loans.

    “We want the U.S. to see our ties without mixing it up with China,” Fawad Chaudhry, a spokesman for Khan’s party, said by phone on Wednesday. “We haven’t yet taken a final decision to go to the IMF, though we hope the U.S. won’t hinder if we seek the fund’s support.”

    The new Chinese loan will help Pakistan shore up falling foreign exchange reserves, said Najam Rafique, director of the Islamabad-based Institute of Strategic Studies. He added that Khan leans toward boosting ties with China.

    “China isn’t a distant power, it’s a neighbour,” Rafique said. Khan “will be trying to improve and build upon what’s already in process.”

    — With assistance by Ismail Dilawar, and Faseeh Mangi

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-tariff-threat

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...f-chinese-loan

    China and Saudi Arabia allegedly, step up the game. One a neighbour the other a brother. ameristan threatens.

    What's new.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by OhOh; 03-08-2018 at 12:30 AM.

  • #10
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    What I saw in Pakistan

    Its general election was conducted in a transparent manner, with robust processes

    Written by S Y Quraishi | Updated: August 3, 2018 604 am



    A Pakistani casts his vote at a polling station for the parliamentary elections in Islamabad, Pakistan

    "The general election in Pakistan is being described as a milestone in the democratic history of the country. This is only the second transition from one full-term civilian government to another, and the first under the new Election Law, 2018. I got a great opportunity to observe the event from a ringside seat as a member of the Commonwealth Election Observers Group. The 15-member group headed by Abdulsalami Abubakar, former head of state of Nigeria, spent 12 days to observe events leading up to the election, the polling and counting day and the declaration of the results over three days.

    The group met delegations from the leading political parties, civil society and the media to understand the pre-electoral environment, which was reported to point to a not-too-fair election. We were told of massive pre-poll “rigging”. Mainly, three things were cited: Forcing of certain party leaders to return their tickets, muzzling of the media, and misuse of the army and judiciary in favour of a particular party. It is difficult to understand how the changing loyalties of political leaders can be described as rigging — such political engineering is common in the Subcontinent where turncoats and horse trading are household terms. Some media representatives said that after a lot of subtle and overt intimidation, many have decided on self censorship as a wiser option. The hold of the army on institutions like the judiciary, the National Accountability Bureau, the media, etc was a common refrain. We were told naming the army was taboo, full of risks. Therefore, alternative expressions or euphemisms had been evolved, like “establishment”, “powers that be”, “khalai makhlooq” (people from outer space), “angels” and even “agriculture department”.

    People who questioned the impartiality of the military and judiciary cited the timing of court cases against certain political leaders and candidates. Media were allegedly prevented from fully covering certain issues like the rights of the minorities and the role of state institutions. For the poll-day arrangements, questions were focused on the large-scale deployment of the army. Concerns were raised about the order to deploy soldiers inside the polling stations. We, therefore, decided to focus special attention on these concerns.

    We observed that candidates from across parties and independents were able to campaign freely and peacefully. Maybe we arrived too late, by which time the games were already played. The overall security situation was tense, especially in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK) and Balochistan, where terrorist attacks in the preceding weeks claimed more than 170 lives, including of three candidates. However, the parties were able to organise their rallies freely as per Election Rules 2017. A lot of negative and abusive campaigning was initially reported but after the Election Commission of Pakistan’s (ECP) stern action under the model code, most people fell in line.

    We found the electoral system quite robust, with a substantially reformed legal framework consisting of the Constitution of Pakistan, the Elections Act, 2017 and Election Rules, 2017, which has led to a greater autonomy of the ECP, including financial autonomy, power to make rules and punish for contempt, and to deregister or delist an existing political party. Officials deputed for election duties have now been brought under the ECP’s disciplinary control.

    Some legal reforms for enhancing women voters’ participation are noteworthy. The ECP can declare an election null and void if less than 10 per cent women have voted in a constituency. This had a salutary effect in those frontier regions where women were traditionally not allowed to vote. Each party has to nominate a minimum of 5 per cent women candidates for the general seats in the National Assembly. This is in addition to 70 seats in the National Assembly (272 members) which are filled by nomination by the political parties according to the number of seats won. (Incidentally, 10 seats are reserved for minorities). Special campaigns by the National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA), political parties and civil society helped increase their enrolment as voters. Separate polling stations for women, run entirely by women, also encouraged turnout.

    Polling day passed off peacefully much to everyone’s relief. There was a 53 per cent turnout, significantly higher than the 48 per cent in 2013.
    Unlike India, the counting in Pakistan is done at the polling station itself immediately after polling closes. There were several questions raised about the counting. Some parties alleged that the polling agents were not allowed to observe the counting from close up. Some complained that their agents were thrown out of the stations. There were allegations that Form 45 (result sheet) was neither given to polling agents nor pasted on the wall of the PS. The ECP denied the first allegation clarifying that only those agents who were in excess of one per party were asked to leave. It, however, admitted to several instances of the second allegation and promised to take action. The ECP also admitted the failure of the Result Transmission System because it had not been pilot tested adequately. The foreign minister, whom we met, attributed this, in a lighter vein, to the failure of the British technology on which the app was based.

    The conduct of the proscribed militant-dominated religious organisations was watched with interest, a phenomenon of special concern to India. We noted that the ECP, in accordance with the law, did not allow the registration of such entities and individuals to contest elections. However, its mechanism for filtering candidates linked to such organisations was weak which led to three candidates managing to slip through scrutiny. They were, however, delisted on the eve of the election after a hue and cry of the media and civil society. It is remarkable that religious parties with extremist connections were totally routed both in national and provincial assemblies. Tehreek-e-Labbaik managed to get only two seats in Karachi whereas the Allah-o-Akbar party drew a blank.

    The elections were closely observed by a huge force of volunteers of civil society led by the Free and Fair Election Network (FAFEN) and Trust for Democracy Education and Accountability, besides international observers from the EU, Commonwealth and several diplomats. FAFEN deployed 19,683 citizen observers (including 5,846 women) at more than 65,000 polling stations (almost 80 per cent of the total). Most observers were satisfied with arrangements and conduct of elections. The Commonwealth group commended the ECP for a laudable job in the short time it had to implement its mandate for holding transparent elections on schedule. It regarded the General Election 2018 as an important milestone in strengthening democracy in Pakistan.

    Quraishi is former chief election commissioner of India and the author of An Undocumented Wonder — The Making of the Great Indian Election"

    https://indianexpress.com/article/op...itary-5289194/


    An article, from a former chief election commissioner of India, suggesting the election was well administered. From an Indian voice, high praise indeed.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  • #11
    Happy Birthday Jesus
    Hugh Cow's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Last Online
    13-12-2018 @ 09:35 AM
    Location
    Qld/Bangkok
    Posts
    1,630
    Good luck. I suppose there new engagement with China will mean they will refuse all U.S. aid from those greedy americans. By all means reject the IMF who actually expect the money to be used responsibly. The chinese will give them any amount no strings at least until they cant pay. In a country where people are murdered for being suspected of anti islam sentiment, woman are stoned to death and vaccines are refused because they are some western mind control conspiracy and radical Islamic militants abound and this is going to become a prosperous asean like country, most of which, like China, are ruled by some form of dictatorship. Truly aspirational. Please excuse my cynicism.

  • #12
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    ^

    Luck is only useful if you don't squander it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    the IMF who actually expect the money to be used responsibly
    Responsibly defined by the bankers for the bankers more like it.

    Look at the great deals the IMF and the west have managed to force on many countries and report back with any success stories you find. I mean success for the citizens not the bankers and arms salesmen.

    Any Asian ones would be a place to focus initially. Russia, Japan, Indonesia, Philippines, India ........ none made any better by the west or IMF actions. Africa, South America, Europe, come on there must one somewhere.

    Have you read "Confessions of an Economics Hit Man".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confessions_of_an_Economic_Hit_Man


    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    In a country where people are murdered for being suspected of anti islam sentiment, woman are stoned to death and vaccines are refused because they are some western mind control conspiracy and radical Islamic militants abound and this is going to become a prosperous asean like country,
    Plenty of deaths in the west for anti ........ sentiment. plenty of men and women are injected to death, placed in concentration camps, starved to death, refused medical aid because their poor, are mandatory made to vaccinate their children, denied water ....... Plenty of countries scared of black bags coming home funding, arming, feeding, training, proxy terrorist forces. Open your eyes.
    Last edited by OhOh; 03-08-2018 at 09:52 PM.

  • #13
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    Has Imran Khan been handed a way to help Pakistan?

    American firm close to discover oil reserves in Pakistan



    "KARACHI: The American multinational oil and gas company Exxon Mobil is close to discover huge oil reserves near the Pak-Iran border, which could be even bigger than the Kuwaiti reserves.This was informed by Minister for Maritime and Foreign Affairs Abdullah Hussain Haroon while addressing business leaders at the Federation of Pakistan Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FPCCI).

    Exxon Mobil has so far drilled up to 5,000 meters close to the Iranian border and is optimistic about the oil find, he added.

    He also informed that the Government of Pakistan had already taken an undertaking from the company to set up a generation complex worth $10 billion. “Foreign investors are interested in coming to Pakistan, provided we manage to meet their standards and attract them to make investment,” he stressed.

    He emphasized the need for integrating the Karachi Port and Port Qasim so that they could supplement each other in the larger interest of the country.

    The minister said that there was a greater need to have new area for fish harbour because the existing one has many issues and there is shortage of land. However, he regretted that the harbour is not well kept and hoped that the European Union (EU) will give subsidy for new fish harbour.

    Earlier Ghazanfar Bilour, President FPCCI said that Pakistan trade was facing global competition both in terms of marketing products and trade diplomacy as the agreement signed by Pakistan to expand exports were not providing potential benefits.

    He appreciated the role of foreign ministry in achieving GSP Plus status from the European Union but pointed out that there was a need to find a lobbyist to get GSP from USA for our textile products. “We need strong advocacy to achieve market access for Pakistani products in other leading markets, and of course, correction in the existing bilateral trade agreements.” He remarked.

    He emphasised the need for further development in maritime sector especially in areas like ship construction, expansion of national shipping fleet and improvement of port infrastructure for docking modern vessels with larger cargo carrying capacity.

    He pointed out that creation of inland water transport would be a feasible solution for its environment friendly, least costly, fuel efficient and less hazardous mode of transportation.

    Tariq Haleem, Vice President FPCCI in his address highlighted the need for bringing down the cost of doing business and improve the efficiency at all Pakistan ports. Even a single rupee of extra cost at the ports trickles down to our masses and if we could save that the saving would also trickle down to our masses, he remarked.

    He said that at Karachi Port about 27 million tons (import & export) of dry and liquid cargo was handled annually. But in actual fact these volumes were not satisfactory, reason being the extreme shortage of space at the Karachi Port, which was surprising keeping in view the fact that this port was one of the biggest land owners of the city.

    He suggested that since the port land was occupied by parties on weak stay orders or land mafia immediate action was required on war footing to get back the land.

    Talking about the importance of inland waterways he said that there was a need to connect Sindh and Punjab and onward to restart the movement of people and goods through inland waterways. This would reduce the cost of transportation can this be reduced by considerably. “When you re-commission your inland waterways then automatically flood management is done and wastage of water is curtailed.” He added.

    The event was also addressed by Chairman Port Trust Admiral Jamil Akhtar, Chairman Pakistan national Shipping Corporation, and Commander Naeem Sarfaraz of Inland Waterways."

    https://dailytimes.com.pk/278057/american-firm-close-to-discover-oil-reserves-in-pakistan/

    ExxonMobil close to hitting huge oil reserves in Pakistan, bigger than Kuwait?s | Arab News

    https://www.eurasiafuture.com/2018/0...-oil-reserves/
    Attached Images Attached Images

  • #14
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    gone down the rabbit hole
    Posts
    5,531
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Has Imran Khan been handed a way to help Pakistan?

    American firm close to discover oil reserves in Pakistan
    "Help" will be on its way soon enough...

    Last edited by SKkin; 07-08-2018 at 05:30 AM. Reason: addition

  • #15
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    27,430

    Imran Khan takes oath as Pakistani prime minister

    ISLAMABAD, Aug. 18 (Xinhua) -- Cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan was sworn in as prime minister of Pakistan here on Saturday morning.


    President Mamnoon Hussain administered the oath to Imran Khan as the 22nd prime minister of Pakistan. Caretaker Prime Minister Nasir ul Mulk was also present at the ceremony.

    The ceremony was attended by diplomats, ministers, lawmakers, other political leaders, military and civil officials and dignitaries.

    The national anthem was played as Imran Khan, wearing the national dress, entered the main hall of the Presidency. Khan's wife Bushra also attended the ceremony.

    The national assembly, or the lower house of the parliament, elected Imran Khan on Friday.

    He had received 176 votes as against 96 votes secured by his only rival Shehbaz Sharif of the opposition Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N).

    Khan's Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, or Movement for Justice, emerged as the single largest party in the July 25 parliamentary elections.


    Imran Khan takes oath as Pakistani prime minister - Xinhua | English.news.cn

  • #16
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 11:14 AM
    Posts
    3,658
    ^A hope for better Pakistan...

  • #17
    Member
    Lantern's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:25 PM
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    981
    ^Agreed, he gives me hope that many of Pakistan's issues will be looked into.

  • #18
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,647
    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ^A hope for better Pakistan...





    But seriously, what you see as better or what those with the guns and a rather inflexible ideology see as better?

  • #19
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    All changes will be noted and strategy revised. Let's hope his has friends he can rely on. As all of us need friends, countries leaders and village or internet forum oddities.

    Without nude photos of his wife published on the net, how can some judge his sincerity?

  • #20
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    Keeping promises: PM Imran moves to three-bedroom residence

    ISLAMABAD:

    "In his maiden address as prime minister, Imran Khan labelled the lavish lifestyles of Pakistan’s ruling elite as a “colonial-era mindset” and made good on his promise to take up residence in a three-bedroom home assigned to the PM’s military secretary instead of the Prime Minister House. The prime minister also plans to have only two servants instead of 524 reserved for a sitting premier and plans to sell a fleet of armoured luxury vehicles to help the national exchequer, a bold move in a country where militants still pose a threat.

    “I want to tell my people, I will live a simple life, I will save your money,” he said.
    The former cricket legend was sworn in as prime minister on Saturday after his party swept to power in last month’s election. A firebrand populist, PM Imran’s appeal has soared in recent years on the back of his anti-corruption drive, which has resonated with young voters and the expanding middle class in the mainly-Muslim nation of 208 million people.

    But he has inherited a host of problems at home and abroad, including a brewing currency crisis and fraying relations with historic ally, the United States.

    The 65-year-old did not shed any light on policy plans to deal with the currency woes that analysts expect will force Pakistan to seek another International Monetary Fund (IMF) bailout. Instead, Khan focused on debt and said former central bank governor Ishrat Husain would lead a task-force to drive austerity.

    PM Imran chairs first cabinet meeting

    PM Imran also appealed to expats to invest in the country and urged the wealthy to start paying taxes, a perennial problem in a nation famous for tax dodging and where less than 1 percent of the population files income tax. “It is your responsibility to pay taxes,” said Khan. “Think of this as a jihad (holy war), that you need to pay tax for the betterment of your country.”

    The cricketer-turned-politician said Pakistan was in grave danger from the effects of climate change and promised to reduce some of the world’s highest maternal death rates and infant mortality rates. He also spoke passionately about the need to help 22.8 million out-of-school Pakistani children in a nation where the literacy rate hovers above 40 per cent.

    PM unveils 21-strong cabinet

    PM Imran, who has never held a government position, named his 21-person cabinet over the weekend, opting mostly for experienced politicians. Opponents criticised the choices, saying about half of the cabinet had served under the former military ruler Gen (retd) Pervez Musharraf and were part of the old guard. On Sunday, Khan announced he will oversee the interior ministry."


    https://tribune.com.pk/story/1785174...oom-residence/

  • #21
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,647
    A bit naive though I suppose it doesn't matter much when you're dead.

    Will be interesting to view his reaction in slomo when it happens.

  • #22
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    Imran Khan’s First Foreign Policy Victory: Demonstrating That Peace is Possible

    "During the recent oath taking ceremony for Pakistan’s new Prime Minister Imran Khan, one of the invited guests of honour was Navjot Singh Sidhu, the retired Indian cricketer who currently sits as the Minister of Local Government, Tourism, Cultural Affairs, Archives and Museums in the government of (Indian) Punjab. During the oath taking ceremony, Navjot Singh Sidhu was photographed embracing General Qamar Javed Bajwa, the chief of Pakistan’s Army. Furthermore, during the ceremony itself Navjot Singh Sidhu was seated next to Masood Khan, the President of Azad Kashmir.Speaking about the ceremony, Navjot Singh Sidhu described himself as a goodwill ambassador for India, an informal yet meaningful role made all the more intriguing for the fact that like his long time personal friend Imran Khan, Navjot Singh Sidhu was a professional cricketer who later entered politics. On the whole, Navjot Singh Sidhu should be applauded for coming to Islamabad in a spirit of good will, peace and dignity. It is these kinds of humane and interpersonal gestures that are the only clear gateway to the kind of pan-south Asian peace that Imran Khan has stated that he strives to achieve. While it make appear overly ambitious to say that handshakes and embraces are related to a lasting peace, it is often the symbolism that helps to ignite a long and necessarily difficult process of dialogue.


    To understand this, one only needs to remember how in June of this year, the world reacted to Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump shaking hands and smiling together. While the handshakes and the smiles did not immediately translate into policy, the images signalled a new era where threats would be replaced with constructive discussions and suspicion would be replaced by steps taken to build trust. At once, over half a century of hostility was replaced by a new mentality. To say this was insignificant would be a supreme betrayal of objectivity.


    While Navjot Singh Sidhu does not represent the Government of India, as an important regional politician with a very recognisable face, he did represent that notion that under the right circumstances and with the right leadership, Indians and Pakistanis needn’t live in a permanent state of hostility and distrust. Sadly, for much of the Indian media and members of Prime Minister Modi’s BJP, a very different meaning was derived from Navjot Singh Sidhu’s visit to Islamabad. Navjot Singh Sidhu has been labelled as traitor by some while the BJP are demanding that he is suspended as a member of the Congress party.
    Similar statements were written about Donald Trump by the liberal US mainstream media when in a moment of confusion he politely saluted a General from the DPRK before they both shook hands. This same attitude only magnified ten-fold or more now dominates much of the Indian media. This sad, regressive and parochial response to a good will mission by a patriotic and talented Indian is demonstrative of a mentality that not only rejects peace but is fundamentally ill-prepared for peace.

    Against this background, it is fair to say that if Navjot Singh Sidhu was an official representative of New Delhi, a much needed bilateral peace process might be further ahead than under the current leadership. Of course, it cannot be restated enough that handshakes and embraces are not at all equivalent to a formal peace agreement. But as Imran Khan stated regarding a future peace process, “If India takes one step [forward] we’ll take two”. Navjot Singh Sidhu’s visit therefore should be viewed as a symbolic first step in whose path New Delhi policy makers could have followed. Instead supporters of the BJP and other ultra-nationalists want to take several steps back by harassing Navjot Singh Sidhu for acting in a polite and diplomatic manner.



    Few politicians in the world, even in the most bellicose nations claim they prefer war to peace. But actions, even small and symbolic ones speak louder than words. Until the Indian leadership learns to speak the proverbial language of Navjot Singh Sidhu, it will be difficult to secure meaningful peace. However, in inviting Navjot Singh Sidhu to his oath taking, Imran Khan has shown that perhaps in the future under an Indian leadership that acts more like Navjot Singh Sidhu and less like his detractors, anything is possible. It is simply a matter of will, a matter of mentality and a matter of bilateral commitment."


    https://www.eurasiafuture.com/2018/08/20/imran-khans-first-foreign-policy-victory-demonstrating-that-peace-is-possible/


    Ons small step is all that's needed to start a journey.

  • #23
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:58 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,755
    Has another world leader appeared on the scene who uses sensible words rather than bombs from 10,000m?

    Geert Wilders cancels Muhammad cartoon contest after Pakistan protests

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/geert-wilders-cancels-muhammad-cartoon-092822606.html


    Imran Khan Has Won The “Cartoon Wars”

    "The Dutch parliamentarian Geert Wilders like many European politicians is opposed to mass migration but unlike most of his counterparts who see the issue in terms of European security, for Wilders, the migration issue is part of a wider battle against Islam which he claims is incompatible with European society. Even still, such views are not at all uncommon in Europe. What does however separate Wilders from those of a similar ideology is the fact that he frequently stages provocations designed to anger Muslims not just in Europe but in the wider world.
    Wilders was planning to stage a cartoon drawing contest wherein contestants from the Netherlands and around the world would compete to see who could draw the best cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad. Because images of prophets are forbidden in Islam, this was clearly going to generate controversy as similar incidents in Europe have done in the past.

    Pakistan’s new Prime Minister Imran Khan was the first major world leader to spearhead a global opposition to the Dutch cartoon contest. Imran Khan’s statements urging an immediate cancellation of the cartoon contest reverberated throughout Pakistan where mass protests took place against Wilders. Ultimately, Wilders cancelled the contest citing security concerns."

    continues at:

    https://www.eurasiafuture.com/2018/0...-cartoon-wars/

  • #24
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 11:14 AM
    Posts
    3,658
    ^^^^^
    By contrast, Imran Khan has injected a powerful dignity to the entire matter and achieved the outcome that he and millions of other Muslims, including his political opponents sought. By taking the requisite peaceful and dignified action steps to solve a problem, Imran Khan delivered while other heads of government in Muslim majority countries did little to address the matter. Perhaps they would have only spoken out when it was too

    One needn’t be a religious Muslim nor a devoted anti-Islamic ideologue to understand the political significance of Imran Khan’s soft power victory. Without firing a shot and without making any threats or attempts at compulsion against Wilders, Pakistan’s Prime Minister was able to effect a positive change and avoid what could have easily become a situation that could trigger cycles of violence at a time when the world is already far too violent. In this sense, the entire world should salute Imran Khan – his peaceful actions kept people happy and kept people safe.

  • #25
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    gone down the rabbit hole
    Posts
    5,531
    Bless him for trying...but seems to me he's a sheep being led to slaughter.

  • Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •