Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678
Results 176 to 198 of 198
  1. #176
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,343
    The Architect of China's Muslim Camps Is a Rising Star Under Xi
    Bloomberg News


    If one individual sums up the values gap between a rising China and the West, it may well be Chen Quanguo.

    The most senior Communist Party official in the far western region of Xinjiang is the architect behind a
    crackdown against Muslim minority Uighurs. The United Nations says the campaign has placed as many as 1 million of them -- roughly a tenth of the territory’s population -- in “re-education camps.”

    The European Union has condemned the mass detentions and U.S. lawmakers have called for sanctions on Chen and other top Chinese officials, threatening to exacerbate tensions already roiled by an escalating trade war. Senator Marco Rubio described the reports out of Xinjiang as “like a horrible movie.”

    But in China, Chen has been a rising star. His actions in Xinjiang, along with demonstrations of loyalty to President Xi Jinping, won him a promotion last year to the Communist Party’s powerful Politburo -- making him one of China’s 25 most powerful officials. In 2023, the 62-year-old Chen may be considered for a spot on its supreme Standing Committee, which has seven members.

    Chen’s ascendance is bigger than one man. It’s fueling concern among Western governments about whether Xinjiang is being used to test a new model of authoritarian rule that could transform the way the country is governed, and potentially be exported around the region. It risks a new front to growing U.S.-China tensions that already span trade, cyber-security, and a battle for influence across much of Asia-Pacific as Xi seeks to make his nation a global superpower by 2050.

    Any U.S. move to sanction Chen would stoke fears in China of a foreign plot to undercut its sovereignty in a region it has struggled to control, a sensitive subject for a party persistently worried about independence movements in Hong Kong, Taiwan and Tibet. More than any of China’s top leaders currently in power, Chen has been at the forefront of China’s efforts to subdue those restive regions.


    The old town of Kashgar in Xinjiang.
    Photographer: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

    “What we have is a clash of values,” said James Leibold, a senior lecturer at La Trobe University in Melbourne. “The policies that have been enacted under his watch in Xinjiang are the leading edge of a far more heavy-handed coercive form of Chinese governance that some in the West are starting to realize could have big consequences for China’s position in the world, as well as China’s relationship with the liberal West.”


    Self-Made Man


    Within the Communist Party, Chen amounts to a self-made man. Unlike Xi, whose father was a senior revolutionary under Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping, Chen had no known family connections to help him climb through the ranks. Relatively little has been written about him compared with China’s other top leaders, with only scraps of information appearing on party websites in Hebei, Tibet and Xinjiang.


    People carry a Communist Party flag past a billboard of Xi Jinping in Kashgar, Xinjiang.
    Photographer: Kevin Frayer/Bloomberg

    Chen grew up in the inland province of Henan around the time of Mao’s Great Leap Forward, which
    saw almost one in eight adults in his prefecture die of starvation, beatings or suicide. He joined the military after turning 18, eventually became a Communist Party member and attended college.
    Though Chen graduated when China was opening up to the world, his first job out of college saw him join a rural commune in Henan, beginning a nearly four-decade journey from lowly apparatchik to Politburo member. While rising through the ranks, he served at one point under Li Keqiang, China’s current premier.

    ‘Darkness to Light’


    Chen received his big break in 2011, when he was appointed as the party’s top official in Tibet -- one of the only places in China where foreign diplomats and journalists need permission to travel. It was a prestigious appointment: Hu Jintao had headed the region about a decade before he became president.
    At the time Tibet was still reeling from an outbreak of violence against Beijing’s rule. Chen gave speeches celebrating the Communist Party’s “peaceful liberation” of Tibet, saying its leadership had taken the region “from darkness to light.”

    Chen then rolled out a set of policies that would establish him as Beijing’s point man for quelling ethnic unrest. He
    told the cadres that social stability was their “first responsibility,” instructed them to live in Tibetan villages and assigned party officials to Buddhist temples. Buddhism in Tibet, Chen said, should be adapted to “socialist civilization.” Temples were ordered to display Chinese flags and images of Communist Party leaders.



    A Chinese flag flies in a village in Tibet.
    Photographer: Wang He/Getty Images

    By 2015, Chen stationed some
    100,000 cadres in Tibetan villages and more than 1,700 temples had established party organizations, according to state media. Between 2011 and 2016, the Tibetan government advertised for 12,313 police-related positions -- more than four times as many positions as the preceding five years combined, according to research by Leibold and scholar Adrian Zenz.
    Meng Jianzhu, head of China’s security apparatus during Chen’s time in Tibet, described it as a “leading example for the whole country” in “stability maintenance.”

    Chen also kept a close eye on power shifts in Beijing. In February 2016, he publicly
    hailed Xi as China’s “core” leader months before his title was made official, and has described Xi as a “wise leader” with a “magnificent plan” for China. Members of Chen’s delegation to China’s national legislative sessions that year wore lapel pins emblazoned with Xi’s portrait -- the type of adulation common during Mao’s reign of personality.


    Delegates wear lapel pins with Xi’s portrait in Beijing on March 3, 2016.
    Photographer: Andy Wong/AP

    As Chen clamped down on dissent in Tibet, Xi had a problem in Xinjiang -- a region with some 10 million Turkic-speaking Uighurs where Beijing has long struggled to enforce its rule. They have chafed under Chinese authority, seen by a rise in terrorist attacks and ethnic violence beginning in 2009.


    Xinjiang also sits at the center of Xi’s signature Belt and Road infrastructure initiative, which has promised more than $100 billion to reconstruct ancient trading routes from China to Eurasia. Xi needed it under firm control, and in August 2016 he put Chen in charge of the region to implement a policy to “strike first” against domestic terrorism and unrest.

    Chen immediately set about replicating the system that brought him success in Tibet. He sent Communist Party officials to Uighur villages, created a network of checkpoints and facial-recognition cameras, and shuttered mosques in an effort to “Sinify” Islam in the region. According to one Chinese-language profile, Chen drilled Xinjiang’s security forces using a technique perfected in Tibet: timing police to the second on responding to emergency calls.


    Police patrol a night market in Kashgar, Xinjiang.
    Photographer: Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

    Most controversially, Chen set up the mass re-education camps that have sparked outcry in the U.S. and Europe, as well as
    barbs from U.S. Secretary of State Michael Pompeo. A fax to Xinjiang’s publicity department asking about the camps wasn’t immediately answered.

    Chen is the
    only person ever to have served as both party boss of both Xinjiang and Tibet, according to domestic media reports. His dual strategy of tough security measures and reeducation are designed to “take the ethnicity out of the people and lock them down,” said James Millward, a professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service.

    In Xinjiang Chen “came in and he was highly positioned in the party and was given a mandate to do what he wanted to do and tons of funding to do it,” Millward said. “He clearly has Xi’s support to a remarkable degree.”


    — With assistance by Peter Martin
    Last edited by tomcat; 29-09-2018 at 07:29 AM.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  2. #177
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:00 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,388
    QUOTE=Neo;3831024]Unproven doesn't mean it didn't happen.
    Proven, that a peer concensus agrees that an action happened.

    The overwhelming opinion at this time, based on news reports and first hand accounts, is that there is inhumane repression going on in the Xinjiang region, you can keep saying unproven until you are blue in the face, but unless you have a counter argument showing the opposite is true, based on news reports and first hand accounts then really you are simply talking out of your arse. [/QUOTE]

    My understanding of basic legal rights is that the accuser has to prove and gain acceptance by their peers, in a court of law, of their allegations.

    Possible scenarios are tested, juries are requested to deliver a considered verdict based on the proffered evidence.

    If they fail the accused is released and their reputation is unsullied. If they succeed the accused is sentenced by the judge according to the severity of the crime as laid down in a tariff.

    You "overwhelming opinion" has not been proven anywhere. Are you suggesting that if one does a search of the number of "articles" available on the internet, place the articles into piles - those that support a viewpoint and those that don't and the pile with the most articles, ,it becomes a internet fact and hence "overwhelming opinion" leading to a legal ruling?

    As I have already posted even if I do present alternate "articles" that doesn't necessarily make them facts. By your definition that by posting "articles based on news reports and first hand accounts" one, from whichever viewpoint, is "talking out one's arse".

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Let’s get Putin involved!
    What has the Russian President to do with Chinese citizens being allegedly arrested by Chinese authorities in China?

    Have your ameristani government purveyors of propaganda, inquired with the Chinese authorities to ascertain what they are accused of, what was the results of their trial was and where they are being held?

    As many here seem to hold, just except your unproven allegations once again.

    Last edited by OhOh; 29-09-2018 at 10:37 AM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  3. #178
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,343
    ...^serpentine diversion alert!...

  4. #179
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    My understanding of basic legal rights is that the accuser has to prove and gain acceptance by their peers, in a court of law, of their allegations.

    Possible scenarios are tested, juries are requested to deliver a considered verdict based on the proffered evidence.

    If they fail the accused is released and their reputation is unsullied. If they succeed the accused is sentenced by the judge according to the severity of the crime as laid down in a tariff.

    You "overwhelming opinion" has not been proven anywhere. Are you suggesting that if one does a search of the number of "articles" available on the internet, place the articles into piles - those that support a viewpoint and those that don't and the pile with the most articles, ,it becomes a internet fact and hence "overwhelming opinion" leading to a legal ruling?

    As I have already posted even if I do present alternate "articles" that doesn't necessarily make them facts. By your definition that by posting "articles based on news reports and first hand accounts" one, from whichever viewpoint, is "talking out one's arse".



    What has the Russian President to do with Chinese citizens being allegedly arrested by Chinese authorities in China?

    Have your ameristani government purveyors of propaganda, inquired with the Chinese authorities to ascertain what they are accused of, what was the results of their trial was and where they are being held?

    As many here seem to hold, just except your unproven allegations once again.

    Translation:

    You must only believe Big Brother.

    China only tells the truth.

    Although in reality, OhOh is a gullible moron.

  5. #180
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    14-11-2018 @ 02:10 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    10,573
    FFS even China is admitting the use of these 're-education' camps.

  6. #181
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    FFS even China is admitting the use of these 're-education' camps.
    That will have him scrabbling for the China Daily editorials.


  7. #182
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:00 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,388
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    That will have him scrabbling for the China Daily editorials.
    Here are links to two articles. One from Reuters and the second from The print, an Indian publisher. Both express the view that Tibet has florished un the Chinese but lament the passing of the idylic Buddhist state of sprirtual leaders, slavery, poor health, education and opportunity. They also mention of the changes in the last decades.

    It depends what you wish for the citizens of China, rural, destitute, uneducated, slaves or progress on so many levels. As we are all aware the intrusion in private affairs are being expanded worldwide. It is the way of life for many.

    Modernising Tibet masks deep contradictions


    https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-c...6652KU20100708

    Time has come to acknowledge that Tibet has vastly improved under Chinese rule

    https://theprint.in/opinion/time-has-come-to-acknowledge-that-tibet-has-vastly-improved-under-chinese-rule/97172/

    Lastly for 'arry a recent article:

    Tibet expo yields fruitful achievements

    Tibet expo yields fruitful achievements - EUROPE - Chinadaily.com.cn

  8. #183
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 12:58 PM
    Location
    across the street
    Posts
    3,519
    ^yeah, so how is the the Han practicing cultural genocide in Tibet and Xinjiang better than the US doing it across North America?

    Same game different players.

    The influx of Hans, however, is one of the great sources of tension in Tibet. Many Tibetans resent their presence, saying they do not bother to learn the language and dominate the region’s economy at the expense of the native population.
    That is a familiar story to one unemployed graduate of a traditional medicine school. While fashionably dressed and able to speak the fluent Mandarin he learned at school, China’s largesse in Tibet has not been enough to win him a job.
    Last edited by uncle junior; 29-09-2018 at 09:33 PM.

  9. #184
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,343
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    That will have him scrabbling for the China Daily editorials.
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Tibet expo yields fruitful achievements - EUROPE - Chinadaily.com.cn
    ......

  10. #185
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    The link from Reuters does more than "lament the passing of Buddhist state", etc.

    You really should try and read past the first line, and get a dictionary for the big words.

    You look like a fucking spoon fed chinky stooge, you idiot.

    The unrest sparked waves of protest across Tibetan areas, which more than two years on has failed to subside despite a heavy military and police presence and harsh punishment for those who question Beijing’s authority.
    The security belies China’s claims to have won over Tibetans.
    “To this day, two years later, they still need to use military and police forces to control the situation. Does it sound like they’ve won the hearts of the people?” asked prominent Tibetan blogger Woeser.


    As for the opinion piece from the senile wobbly, it isn't worth the paper it's written on.

  11. #186
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    27,151
    Xinjiang Authorities Secretly Transferring Uyghur Detainees to Jails Throughout China

    Authorities in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) are secretly transferring Uyghur detainees to prisons in Heilongjiang province and other areas throughout the country to address an “overflow” in the region’s overcrowded political “re-education camps,” according to officials.

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in re-education camps throughout the XUAR, where members of the ethnic group have long complained of pervasive discrimination, religious repression, and cultural suppression under Chinese rule.

    Sources say detainees face rough treatment at the hands of their overseers in the camps and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities.

    While investigating claims from members of the Uyghur exile community, official sources in Kashgar (in Chinese, Kashi) prefecture’s Kona Sheher (Shufu) county confirmed to RFA’s Uyghur Service that authorities have been moving Uyghurs from detention centers in the XUAR to prisons in other parts of China.

    “Based on the seriousness of their crime, inmates are being transferred to other major prisons in the region and also to inner China,” an officer at the police department in Kona Sheher’s Tashmiliq township told RFA, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    “I think they are being transferred to inner China because they can be educated better there, and another reason is that since there are too many prisoners here and we are experiencing an overflow of inmates.”

    The officer said that authorities began relocating Uyghur inmates to other parts of China at “the beginning of this year.”

    “We have a political officer named Najmidin Bedelhaji who took some inmates to a Chinese city last month, but most of the time a unit of the Public Security Bureau escorts them there,” he said.

    “Yasin Abla, the deputy chief of the county police department, and the local head of the Public Security Bureau, is the person in charge of carrying out the transfers.”

    The prisoner transfers add another layer of opacity to extrajudicial detention in the XUAR, where family members are rarely provided with information about why their loved ones are arrested and where they are held.


    Tailai Prison

    Among the facilities that Uyghur detainees have been taken to is a prison with a maximum capacity of 4,300 inmates in northeast China’s Heilongjiang province’s Tailai county, where officials confirmed a transfer had occurred in recent weeks.

    When asked how many detainees were transferred to Tailai Prison, an official with the county Political Consultative Conference told RFA, “I don’t know the exact number,” but said they had been sent there “around one month ago,” citing information he had received from local residents.

    A secretary at the Tailai County Government office, who gave his name as Zhao, also said he was aware that Uyghur detainees had been sent to the county prison, but was unsure of how many.

    “A part of the group came in a week ago,” he said, before referring further questions to Tailai Prison officials.

    A Han Chinese resident of Tailai county told RFA the Uyghur detainees were sent to the local prison as part of a “prisoner exchange.”

    “The prisoners from Xinjiang were transferred to our county prison, and the prisoners in our prison were sent to Xinjiang,” said the resident, who asked to remain unnamed.

    “It seems the Uyghur prisoners were removed to prevent unrest in Xinjiang. As a result, the prison guards [here] are demanding a pay raise, citing the risks they now face at their work.”

    According to the resident, Tailai Prison normally interns prisoners who have been sentenced to 15 years or more in jail for serious offenses.

    “I believe the prisoner swap has been completed,” she said, adding that she had learned about the transfer from the family members of guards at Tailai Prison.

    “The People's Armed Police chartered trains and delivered the prisoners for the swap.”


    Train ticket moratorium

    Information about the prisoner swap came amid a Sept. 26 report by the Urumqi Evening News that sales of train tickets will be suspended indefinitely from Oct. 22.

    "The Xinjiang railway administrative departments will stop selling tickets on all passenger services leaving Xinjiang, and also for intraregional services, from Oct. 22, 2018," the newspaper reported.

    "A separate announcement will be made regarding when ticket sales will be resumed," it said.

    Meanwhile, several anonymous sources in the XUAR gave anecdotal evidence to RFA suggesting that the authorities are preparing to move large numbers of prisoners in and out of the region in the coming weeks, estimating that as many as 300,000 inmates could be transported across Xinjiang’s road and rail networks.

    "The prisons are overflowing all across Xinjiang, that's one reason [for the ticket sales ban]," an anonymous source told RFA. "The other reason is secrecy; because a lot of the people in the camps, such as the police, the administrators or the workers ... have connections with the local population."

    "Some of the staff in the jails have close relatives who have been locked up there, and they leak information to the outside world," the source said.

    The same source said the authorities are stepping up efforts to impose an information blackout around the camps, many of which have been identified by online researchers using satellite imagery.

    "There was a directive about strengthening management of the re-education camps," the source said. "There are a lot of tangled relationships in the camps, with the friends, relatives and former colleagues of camp staff locked up in there."

    "They are now bringing in administrators from outside the local areas, and at the same time they are transporting the prisoners outside of their local area," the source said.


    Thousands transported

    An overseas source who asked to be identified only as a Muslim, said several thousand ethnic Muslims were transported from Ili Kazakh (Yili Hasaake) Autonomous Prefecture’s Ghulja (Yining) city near the border with Kazakhstan, to Altay, in the same prefecture, while the inmates at Altay were sent to detention facilities in Changji Hui Autonomous Prefecture.

    The source said Uyghurs from Kashgar and Aksu in the south of the region were meanwhile being transferred to the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, or bingtuan, prison facilities in Ili.

    The authorities have also begun recruiting large numbers of personnel from the western region of Gansu in a bid to replace local staff and guards in the camps, the source said.

    In Ili's Kunes (Xinyuan) county, several hundred army and police personnel were dispatched to escort several thousand inmates of a "re-education camp for extremists" to Yining railway station, where they were put on a train for an unknown destination.

    Passers-by were banned from taking photos, private vehicles were banned from the streets and businesses along the route were ordered to close during the operation, a source in the region said.

    And a separate source said that large numbers of people had been converging on the regional capital, Urumqi, in recent days aboard buses with the windows blacked out.

    "It's because there are so many of them locked up; they are being taken to other parts of China, one busload at a time," she said.



    Route closure

    Meanwhile, the Aksu Highway Administration shut down the Tielimaiti tunnel along with a large section of nearby highway, citing a large snowfall in the area, according to a notice of closure shown to RFA.

    "Owing to recent weather conditions, the section of highway near the Tielimaiti Tunnel has seen a large snowfall over a wide area ... and are unsuitable for traffic," the notice said.

    National highway G217, an arterial and, in parts, a former military restricted road linking the northern and southern parts of Xinjiang across the Tianshan mountains and the Taklamakan Desert, was therefore announced closed until the end of April 2019, it said.

    "Traffic is prohibited to all vehicles," the notice, signed by Kucha and Aksu county highway agencies and traffic police, said. "We apologize for any inconvenience caused."

    A source in Xinjiang said the Duku section of the highway linking Dushanzi and Kucha could have been ordered closed to enable the secret transportation of prisoners across the region, or their transfer to railway stations for transportation to other parts of China.

    Another source said it may be needed to send armed police reinforcements to Ili and Kashgar, or to send detainees to other provinces.

    An official who answered the phone at the Xinjiang regional government press office in Urumqi on Monday declined to comment when contacted by RFA, saying it was the wrong number.

    Repeated calls to the police department, local police stations and guesthouses in Guma county (in Chinese, Pishan) in Xinjiang's Hotan prefecture rang unanswered during office hours on Monday.



    Camp network

    Western governments have increasingly drawn attention to re-education camps in the XUAR in recent months as media reports detail the stories of Uyghurs who have been detained in the facilities.

    U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert recently said the U.S. government was "deeply troubled" by the crackdown on Uyghurs in Xinjiang, adding that “credible reports indicate that individuals sent by Chinese authorities to detention centers since April 2017 number at least in the hundreds of thousands, and possibly millions.”

    The official warned that “indiscriminate and disproportionate controls on ethnic minorities’ expressions of their cultural and religious identities have the potential to incite radicalization and recruitment to violence.”

    A group of U.S. lawmakers, in a recent letter, asked President Donald Trump’s administration to “swiftly act” to sanction Chinese government officials and entities complicit in or directing the “ongoing human rights crisis” in Xinjiang.

    The position of China's central government authorities has evolved from denying that large numbers of Uyghurs have been incarcerated in camps to disputing that the facilities are political re-education camps. Beijing now describes the camps as educational centers.

    Adrian Zenz, a lecturer in social research methods at the Germany-based European School of Culture and Theology, has said that some 1.1 million people are or have been detained in the re-education camps, which equates to 10 to 11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the region.

    Dolkun Isa, president of the Munich-based World Uyghur Congress, called the reported prisoner transfers “China's attempt to eliminate the Uyghur detainees through cultural genocide coupled with ethnic cleansing.”

    China’s treatment of Uyghurs in the XUAR amounts to “crimes against humanity,” he said, urging the international community to “urgently respond” to the situation there.

    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018171100.html

  12. #187
    Valve Master
    Latindancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    10,680
    Ten or 11 percent ?
    They may not be killing them, but they are almost literally decimating them.

    Decimate :

    verb: decimate kill, destroy, or remove a large proportion of.



      • drastically reduce the strength or effectiveness of (something).


    • historical

      kill one in every ten of (a group of people, originally a mutinous Roman legion) as a punishment for the whole group.

  13. #188
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,343
    ...I understand their prison gruel is porridge-based...

  14. #189
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    27,151
    Growing Evidence Forced China to Acknowledge Xinjiang Political ‘Re-education Camps’: Researcher

    After more than a year of denying the existence of political “re-education camps” in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR), a vast buildout of a system housing as many as a million Uyghurs has forced Beijing to acknowledge the facilities and justify them to the international community, according to a camp researcher based in Canada.

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in re-education camps throughout the XUAR, where members of the ethnic group have long complained of pervasive discrimination, religious repression, and cultural suppression under Chinese rule.

    While Beijing initially denied the existence of such camps, the Uyghur chairman of Xinjiang’s provincial government, Shohrat Zakir, told China’s official Xinhua news agency earlier this month that the facilities are an effective tool to protect the country from terrorism and provide vocational training for Uyghurs.

    According to Zakir, Uyghurs and other ethnic Muslims in the region are taught Mandarin at the camps, as well as important vocational skills and lessons on Chinese law, all while being provided with free meals in comfortable living conditions, and that they are free to come and go as they like.

    Reporting by RFA and other media organizations, however, has shown that those in the camps are detained against their will, routinely face rough treatment at the hands of their overseers, and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities.

    Shawn Zhang, a law student at the University of British Columbia, has compiled a blog list of 59 re-education camps he confirmed the existence of by researching government tenders and using information found in the documents to locate the facilities through satellite imagery on Google Maps. He has also identified 16 sites he believes to be camps, but is seeking additional documentation that confirms them as such.

    Speaking to RFA’s Uyghur Service, Zhang said that growing evidence of the camps, which are believed to hold or have held more than 1 million people, have made Chinese authorities “see that they can’t hide it” from the international community, and led Beijing to change its tune in mid-October.

    “It’s different than 30 or 40 years ago when there was no internet and no satellite images, whereas now you have so many satellite images and the Chinese government also published so many documents that have descriptions of these camps,” he said.

    “They see that it is very difficult to hide all this information now, so I think they find that denying it maybe makes them look even more suspicious because they [appear to] want to hide the facts. For the Chinese government, maybe it is more effective to admit to these camps but to use some excuses such as counter-terrorism to justify it.”

    Tracking camps

    Zhang told RFA that he became interested in tracking down re-education camps in late April, after reading about Uyghurs living overseas whose family members had gone missing back in the XUAR, but said he was initially skeptical.

    “So I did some research myself, searching for keywords through Google, and I found some tender notices about this kind of camp,” he said.

    “Some of [the notices] had locations, so I followed the information and I found some of the camps … Usually in Xinjiang’s rural areas, there aren’t very large construction sites, so when you see that you can tell it is a camp. In most of them there are wire fences inside the camps in front of buildings. It’s very rare in Xinjiang that these kinds of buildings will have wire fences surrounding … the entrances.”

    Zhang noted that according to China’s official explanation, there are only re-education camps at the county level and above in the XUAR, but he said that through his research he had found that “even villages and small towns” have detention and political indoctrination centers.

    “You need to pay good attention to detail, because there isn’t much information in government documents,” he said, adding that the camps can be difficult to locate.

    “The Chinese government often builds the camps in the suburbs. These suburbs are often newly built, so the streets have no names on Google Maps … You need to find the names of the streets from the government documents.”

    But while Zhang has located dozens of camps since he began documenting them earlier this year, he said the facilities are becoming much more difficult to find.

    “The problem is that the Chinese government is deleting all information about the re-education camps from the internet, so I haven’t been able to find a tender notice since at least August or so,” he explained.

    Growing scrutiny

    Western governments have increasingly drawn attention to the camp network, where Adrian Zenz, a lecturer in social research methods at the Germany-based European School of Culture and Theology, has said that some 1.1 million people are or have been detained—equating to 10 to 11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the XUAR.

    U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert recently said the U.S. government was “deeply troubled” by the crackdown on Uyghurs, while U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley described it earlier this month as “the largest internment of civilians in the world today” and “straight out of George Orwell,” during a speech at the Chiefs of Defense Conference Dinner in Washington.

    Next week in Geneva, China is likely to face a grilling on the Uyghur camps from some Western countries at the UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of its human rights record.

    According to Zhang, by acknowledging the existence of the camps, but portraying them in a way that suggests they have been established to help improve the lives of ethnic Uyghurs in the XUAR, the government is putting on a “performance to convince outsiders.”

    But Zhang said that according to what he has uncovered in his research, “it is almost impossible to provide such activities” as vocational training, because the camps lack the infrastructure to do so.

    Instead, he said, the camps serve as indoctrination centers that the Chinese government is using to achieve its “ultimate goal” of “fully assimilating Uyghurs into the Chinese identity.”

    “The Chinese government thinks that separatism in Xinjiang is a result of Uyghurs’ own identity,” he said.

    “When one [minority] group keeps their own identity apart from the Chinese people, the Chinese government may think it is very dangerous. They think it will lead to separatism. So I think their ultimate goal is to transform Uyghur people into ordinary Chinese.”

    But Zhang cautioned against the approach of forcing Uyghurs to conform to Chinese culture.

    “In my opinion, this kind of coercion hasn’t succeeded in the past, because it is impossible to convince a group of people when they aren’t voluntarily taking part,” he said.

    “It may lead to more instability or even more violence because when so many people suffer this kind of tragedy, some become more extremist.”

    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018173222.html

  15. #190
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    Only telling us what we already know, which is that the chinkies are lying.

  16. #191
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:00 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,388
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    housing as many as a million Uyghurs
    Still peddling unsubstantiated hearsay I see.

  17. #192
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Still peddling unsubstantiated hearsay I see.
    You are the only one peddling propaganda, you simpering sycophant.

    All you can do is peddle the bullshit chinky line.

  18. #193
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:00 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,388
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    You are the only one peddling propaganda, you simpering sycophant.

    All you can do is peddle the bullshit chinky line.
    Any facts to enlighten us with?

    Thought not just retching up MK's ameristani, RFA propaganda..


  19. #194
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    Have the chinkies fessed up about their arrested spy yet?

    He must be due in court soon.

    Can't you find *anything* in your state propaganda? Like he was an innocent tourist going to see famous Belgian waffles?

  20. #195
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:00 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    15,388
    You know the Chinese, they take a while to answer. They have laws and courts procedures, such things as we know may take their own ways.

    Better than tweeting something and immediately having to ridicule oneself with a denial. Although some use the "miss spoke"excuse and many actually believe them.

  21. #196
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:34 AM
    Posts
    52,906
    Funny that, normally you can't stop posting chinky propaganda but they don't want their own people to know they're a bunch of thieving bastards.

  22. #197
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    27,151
    Hundreds of Children of Detained Uyghurs Held in ‘Closed School’ in Kashgar Prefecture

    As many as 500 children of detained Uyghurs have been placed in a “closed school” in Kashgar (in Chinese, Kashi) prefecture, in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR), according to a source in exile, who said his two younger brothers are among those held.

    A young Uyghur man named Jesur left his home in Kashgar’s Yarkand (Shache) county for Turkey in 2014 and shortly afterwards, in July of that year, Chinese authorities fired on residents of the county’s Elishku township who were protesting the detention of a dozen Uyghur women for praying overnight at a local mosque, killing what Uyghur exile groups say was as many as 2,000 people.

    A crackdown by police in the county following the incident led to mass jailings of Uyghurs and a lockdown on communication in and out of the area, and Jesur lost contact with his family.

    Jesur, now 23, told RFA’s Uyghur Service that he recently received a video in which his eight- and 10-year-old brothers tearfully informed him that several members of their family had been jailed or sent to political “re-education camps,” where authorities have detained Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas since April 2017.

    His brothers said that they had been placed in a “closed school” for children of Uyghur detainees in their home township of Kachung and appealed to him to help free them.

    “I learned that my two younger brothers are in a closed school in Kachung township,” he said, adding that there are “approximately 500 children” held in the facility.

    “The children are not allowed to have any contact with outside. If relatives want to see them, they must obtain an approval letter from the local police.”

    Additionally, Jesur said, his 45-year-old father Mahmut Sayim, 43-year-old mother Buhelchem Tursun, 25-year-old sister Buranem Mahmut, 20-year-old brother Nureli Mahmut, and uncles Qasim Sayim, Hekim Sayim, and Ablimit Sayim, as well as their wives, are among some 30 members of his extended family who have been sent to prison or re-education camps.

    Jesur said his father was given a lengthy prison sentence for having two children outside of the allotted family planning allowance of two to each ethnic minority family and failing to pay a fine of 100,000 yuan (U.S. $14,420) for each child over the limit. His uncles also received long jail terms, he said, although it was unclear what they had been sentenced for.

    “I learned my father was arrested … after [the Islamic holy month of] Ramadan [which ended on June 14] last year, and my mother was taken away in March of this year, though I don’t know the reason for her arrest,” he said.

    “It is not clear if the rest of my family are in prison or not, but our house is padlocked from the outside.”

    According to Jesur, his brothers appeared “afraid and longing for their parents,” and he told RFA that he is now haunted by the video.

    “I watched the video in which my younger brothers spoke out to me in tears and now the scene constantly appears in my mind,” he said.

    “It makes me so sad and distracted that I keep misplacing things all the time … It has come to the point that I can’t even remember what I’ve been doing all day, or what I should be doing next.”

    Repeated calls to the police station in Kachung and relevant government departments to verify Jesur’s claims went unanswered, or staff members hung up when informed that they were being contacted by RFA.

    But after discovering a fundraising post online by the Kachung Township Party Propaganda Department that sought to raise money for “students facing financial difficulty,” RFA’s reporters were able to contact a Chinese staff member there who confirmed the existence of the school, which he said housed “more than 300 children … [from] Kachung and surrounding areas.”

    “We collected all these children and placed them in the school to help them,” the staffer said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

    “They are all primary school pupils from years one through six. They are all housed in the school, as their parents are in re-education camps.”

    The staff member said that the children need “various forms of support,” including basic educational study kits and second-hand clothing—particularly warm clothing for the winter.

    When asked about conditions at the school, the staff member was unable to provide additional information, but said that “there is the possibility that some orphans have been relocated to similar facilities” in other parts of China, due to overcrowding.


    Children left behind

    While Beijing initially denied the existence of re-education camps, the Uyghur chairman of Xinjiang’s provincial government, Shohrat Zakir, told China’s official Xinhua news agency last month that the facilities are an effective tool to protect the country from terrorism and provide vocational training for Uyghurs.

    Reporting by RFA’s Uyghur Service and other media organizations, however, has shown that those in the camps are detained against their will and subjected to political indoctrination, routinely face rough treatment at the hands of their overseers, and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities.

    An Oct. 21 report by the official Global Times promoting the camps as “training centers” also included photos of children in the XUAR’s Hotan (Hetian) prefecture whose parents had been placed in camps, and claimed that they are warmly cared for at special “schools,” where they engage in educational courses and other activities.

    But sources have told RFA that Uyghur children whose parents have been sent to camps are regularly sent to orphanages that are seriously overcrowded, calling the conditions “terrible,” with children “locked up like farm animals in a shed.”

    Others say that while the orphanages received substantial cash donations from the public, “only a very little is spent on the children,” and that the facilities save money by giving the kids meat only once a week, while the rest of the time they are provided with “rice soup.”

    Jesur told RFA that his worst fear is that he may never learn what becomes of his younger brothers.

    “I think about my brothers constantly, as they don’t have my parents to look after them and the authorities may send them to eastern China, where they will be brought up like Han Chinese,” he said.

    “That is my biggest worry. I know it is impossible for me to return, but I … wish that I was able to take care of them as a big brother should. As my anger towards the Chinese authorities has grown … I decided to tell the world the tragic story of how the government has treated my family.”



    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018162416.html

  23. #198
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    27,151
    US Lawmakers Unveil Bill Calling For Release of Uyghurs From China’s Detention Camps

    U.S. lawmakers introduced legislation on Wednesday calling for the release of over a million ethnic Uyghurs detained by China in re-education camps and urging Washington to study the scope of Beijing’s crackdown on the Muslim minority group.

    In a press release announcing the launch of the bipartisan bill, in which Republican Representative Chris Smith was joined by Democrat Thomas Suozzi and eight other members of Congress, Smith said the internment of Uyghurs in camps in northwestern China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region “should be treated by the international community as a crime against humanity.”

    “The Chinese government’s creation of a vast system of what can only be called concentration camps cannot be tolerated in the 21st century,” said Smith, co-chair of the Congressional Executive Commission on China.

    “The brutal, religious based persecution of the Uyghurs in China is alarming,” Congressman Suozzi added in prepared remarks on Wednesday. “Xinjiang province has become nothing short of a police state.”

    Among other recommendations, the proposed legislation calls on the U.S. Secretary of State to create a special position at the State Department to coordinate the U.S. response to China’s abuses in Xinjiang and to sanction Chinese officials responsible for the crackdown.

    The U.S. established a Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues in 2002 in response to repression in that Chinese-ruled region.

    The bill also calls on the FBI to track and report on the harassment by China of Uyghurs and other Chinese nationals studying or working in the United States.

    'Historic significance'

    Speaking on Wednesday to RFA’s Uyghur Service, Dolkun Isa—president of the Germany-based exile World Uyghur Congress—called the introduction of the bill a measure of “historic significance at a time when the Chinese government is committing ethnic cleansing against the Uyghur people.”

    “This is a powerful step taken by the U.S. to address the crimes against humanity that are taking place in East Turkestan,” Isa said, using a name preferred by many Uyghurs to refer to their historic homeland.

    “I hope this bill will become legislation soon with the support of both Houses of Congress,” Isa said.

    Also speaking to RFA on Wednesday, Uyghur human rights advocate and lawyer Nury Turkel—board chairman of the Washington, D.C.-based Uyghur Human Rights Project—called the bill’s introduction “the first time in history a Western government is deliberating a legislative mandate to protect Uyghur and other Turkic Muslims in China.”

    “On the occasion of this historic day, I call on the other liberal democracies to put in place similar legislative mandates to protect the Uyghur people who are facing an existential threat in China,” Turkel said, adding, “I also urge the other members of Congress to support this bill in the remainder of this legislative session.”

    The proposed legislation was introduced a week after the United States, France, Germany, and 10 other Western countries used a session of the United Nations Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of China’s human rights record to issue a call on Beijing to close down the political re-education camps.

    “We are alarmed by the government of China’s worsening crackdown on Uyghurs, Kazakhs, and other Muslims in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region," U.S. charge d'affaires Mark Cassayre was quoted by Reuters news agency as saying at the Geneva meeting.

    The United States urged China to "abolish all forms of arbitrary detention, including internment camps in Xinjiang, and immediately release the hundreds of thousands, possibly millions, of individuals detained in these camps,” he said.

    In late August, Smith led a bipartisan group of nearly 20 U.S. lawmakers in writing a letter to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of the Treasury Steven Mnuchin, urging them to level sanctions against officials and entities in China deemed responsible for abusing the rights of ethnic Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities in the XUAR.

    Harsh policies

    The lawmakers identified for sanctions under the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act—created to address human rights abuses by the Putin regime in Russia—XUAR Communist Party secretary Chen Quanguo, who has implemented a litany of harsh policies attacking the rights and freedoms of ethnic Uyghur Muslim residents of Xinjiang since he was appointed to run the region in August 2016.

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in re-education camps throughout Xinjiang, where members of the ethnic group have long complained of pervasive discrimination, religious repression, and cultural suppression under Chinese rule.

    While Beijing initially denied the existence of re-education camps, the Uyghur chairman of Xinjiang’s provincial government, Shohrat Zakir, told China’s official Xinhua news agency last month that the facilities are an effective tool to protect the country from terrorism and provide vocational training for Uyghurs.

    China’s state media have followed Zakir’s remarks with a massive propaganda campaign promoting the camps, while foreign reporters investigating Xinjiang have reported constant harassment by authorities. Uyghur activists called on China to prove the facilities are for vocational training by opening then up to visitors.

    Reporting by RFA’s Uyghur Service and other media organizations has shown that those held in the camps are detained against their will, are subjected to political indoctrination and rough treatment at the hands of their overseers, and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities.

    Adrian Zenz, a lecturer in social research methods at the Germany-based European School of Culture and Theology, has said that some 1.1 million people are or have been detained in the camps—equating to 10 to 11 percent of the adult Muslim population of Xinjiang.



    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018152204.html

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •