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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    RFA: So did you mostly discuss the detention of one million Uyghurs people in China’s political reeducation camps?
    You keep posting RFA claim of 1,000,000 detainees as a fact. Any proof to show us?

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    sa: Yes, the most important discussion was about the detention of one million Uyghurs in China’s concentration camps
    There it is again , a mention of an unproven number.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    the New York Times reported that The Trump administration is considering sanctions against Chinese senior officials and companies to punish Beijing's detention of Uyghurs and other minority Muslims in internment camps.
    It appears the NYT and ameristani politicians have seen through the fake number. No mention of the concentration campseither RFA's editors slipping.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    I am glad the U.S. is taking the issue of the concentration camps quite seriously.
    New label, now their "concentration camps". They will loose the UK, German, Israeli and ameristan vote. Too many skeletons in their own back yard.

    Nobody's been bombed yet. It aint serious.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Isa: The European officials are seriously interested in the issue of the camps and gravely concerned. ..............

    We were also reassured by the officials of the European Parliament and European governments that they would raise this issue with their Chinese counterparts during bilateral dialogues and meetings.
    Two glib nothing political statements from unnamed officials.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    The international community doesn't just watch our suffering
    Oh yes it does all around the world every day. Some even invest their own reputations in keeping it going. There's a $, a shekel or a pound to me garnered.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  2. #127
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    When are you going to realise that your cretinous, pedantic waffling does not work?



    The Co-Rapporteur noted reports of mass detention of ethnic Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslim minorities, and estimates that upwards of a million people were being held in so-called counter-extremism centres and another two million had been forced into so-called “re-education camps” for political and cultural indoctrination.
    Remember that this bloke was your mate until you read it properly.

    You arse.

  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    The Co-Rapporteur
    The reported source of this figure was a person appointed by ameristan to be their CERD representative. He was one of many Co-Rapporteurs, 18 in total, who "reported" to an independent committee at the UN.

    None of the other 17 made such claims.

    Who, as stated by the official UN spokeswoman, was not a UN authorised person to make such dubious and unproven statements, on behalf of the UN.

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    A spokesperson from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) confirmed in a statement to the Grayzone that the allegation of Chinese “camps” was not made by the United Nations, but rather by a member of an independent committee that does not speak for the UN as a whole. That member happened to be the only American on the committee, and one with no background of scholarship or research on China.

    In an email to the Grayzone Project, OHCHR spokesperson Julia Gronnevet confirmed that the CERD was not representative of the UN as a whole.

    “You are correct that the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is an independent body,” Gronnevet wrote. “Quoted comments were made during public sessions of the Committee when members were reviewing State parties.”
    I'll stand with my post which confirms the official UN position.
    Last edited by OhOh; 13-09-2018 at 10:04 PM.

  4. #129
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    OhOh: TD's version of the Fast Show's "Indecisive Dave".





  5. #130
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Chinese Official: Muslim Detention Camps Are ‘Educational Centers’

    In the wake of mass detentions of ethnic Uighurs and other Muslim minorities in China, the country defended the camps on Thursday and characterized them as “educational centers.”

    “It is not mistreatment,” Li Xiaojun, director for publicity at the Bureau of Human Rights Affairs of the State Council Information Office, told reporters at the sidelines of the U.N. Human Rights Council session.

    “What China is doing is to establish professional training centers[.]” Li continued, saying that the detention of the ethnic minority was the “necessary way to deal with Islamic or religious extremism.”

    “The West has failed in doing so, in dealing with religious Islamic extremism,” he said. “Look at Belgium, look at Paris, look at some other European countries. You have failed.” Reuters reports that Li also denied that China’s camps are anything like the work camps seen in “eastern European countries,” apparently referring to the Soviet Gulag camps during the Cold War.

    The Trump administration is reportedly considering sanctioning China over their treatment of the Uighurs.

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/china-...tional-centers

  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Chinese Official: Muslim Detention Camps Are ‘Educational Centers’


    In the wake of mass detentions of ethnic Uighurs and other Muslim minorities in China, the country defended the camps on Thursday and characterized them as “educational centers.”
    I suppose when you're being starved and tortured, the knowledge that you're getting a good old fashioned Chinese brainwashing, er, education is of great comfort.

  7. #132
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    Harry, they are "health centres" because they are not starving people....they are administering intermittent fasting, which as everyone knows, has great health benefits.

  8. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    Harry, they are "health centres" because they are not starving people....they are administering intermittent fasting, which as everyone knows, has great health benefits.
    It's funny, they say that here in the sandpit every Ramadhan, but they have to import extra food because they're all stuffing their fat faces all night long. Then they need to go on a diet afterwards.

  9. #134
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    Our seriously brain-damaged member has commented with a red on my last post :

    -09-2018 09:13 PM HuangLao
    Thread:
    China's Mass Detention of Xinjiang's Ethnic Minorities Shows No Sign of Let-up
    Fukwitted and ignorant Eurocentric illusionist....dumb cnut


    But his brain is so scrambled that it's not worth trying to debate with him here.

  10. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    But his brain is so scrambled that it's not worth trying to debate with him here
    ...ask FaRT: he loves to debate...

  11. #136
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    China has silenced American academics for years. Now they’re pushing back.
    By Fred Hiatt (WaPo)

    Editorial page editor
    September 23 at 7:50 PM


    When it comes to China, Americans are victims of an insidious kind of censorship that stunts the debate they hear and read in nearly invisible ways.
    The censorship — or self-censorship — stems from fear.
    Many academics who specialize in China fear that if they are critical, the Communist rulers will deny them a visa. If you are an anthropologist who needs to interview Chinese villagers, being banned from the country can end your career.

    A professor who speaks honestly about human rights abuses may fear a rebuke, or worse, from university administrators, who in turn fear losing their satellite campus in China — or the lucrative flow of Chinese students to their school.
    Even if you were willing to risk your own future, you might worry that candor would endanger your colleagues here or in China. Those working at think tanks and other nonprofits must make similar calculations every day.

    The upshot is that America’s — and Australia’s, and Europe’s — leading experts on China often remain silent as its regime becomes ever more repressive. Newspaper articles are published without their perspective, op-eds go unwritten, conferences present an incomplete view.
    Which is what makes the Xinjiang Initiative so striking — an unprecedented response to an unprecedented, yet little-noticed, assault on freedom.
    President Xi Jinping has been narrowing the space for free expression for years. His regime has imprisoned and tortured lawyers, silenced reporters and professors, even kidnapped and jailed critics from outside China’s borders.

    But the human rights violations taking place now in the western province of Xinjiang are, as Human Rights Watch said in a recent report, “of a scope and scale not seen in China since the 1966-1976 Cultural Revolution.”

    More than 1 million people, by reliable estimates, have been rounded up and put in prisons, detention centers or reeducation camps. They are Muslims of Turkic ethnicity, and the government’s goal seems to be to eradicate their religion and inculcate Communist fealty. “Within these secretive facilities, those held are forced to undergo political indoctrination for days, months, and even over a year,” Human Rights Watch said.
    Outside the camps, meanwhile, people are subjected to unprecedented surveillance and control, including the compulsory collection of biometric data, such as voice samples and DNA, and assignment of “trustworthiness” grades. Uighurs abroad are harassed and often unable to communicate with relatives inside China. Families are broken up, children indoctrinated while their parents are locked away.

    China denies all this — the camps are for “vocational education,” it says — but won’t let inspectors or reporters in. So news of what is likely one of the greatest crimes against humanity of this young century hardly registers.

    Jerome Cohen and Kevin Carrico, China scholars at New York University and Australia’s Macquarie University, respectively, find this unacceptable. They drafted the Xinjiang Initiative, asking for a pledge to raise awareness of these events in every public forum. More than 100 China scholars signed on.
    “Hundreds of thousands of people of Uyghur and Kazakh descent are being held indefinitely in extra-judicial internment camps in Xinjiang today,” the joint statement explains. “Prisoners are detained due to their ethnicity or Muslim faith, tearing apart families, destroying lives, and threatening culture. These are horrific developments that should have no place in the twenty-first century.

    “The global response to these developments, however, has been muted. Many are still unaware even of the existence of these camps. Reporting on the situation is hindered by an information blockade by the Chinese state, which denies even the existence of any such camps. And those who stand up and speak out openly against these policies may face the wrath of a rising power that is determinedly hostile to criticism.”

    You could be discouraged that the number of signers is yet only in the low three digits. You could be discouraged that one signer already has withdrawn his name. “I’m sure it’s too hot for him, and I’m sure his colleagues have asked him to withdraw it,” Cohen told me.
    But the list is growing and already impressive: young and old, from multiple continents, respected scholars from top-flight schools.
    What’s most striking about the list is that these are, in a very real sense, China’s friends: men and women who have devoted years and decades to learning the language and understanding the people, who wish nothing but the best for China.
    When they and people like them do not participate in the debate, the field is left to shills with little credibility and to the most feverish apostles of deterring and controlling China’s rise.

    If, with the Xinjiang Initiative, more of them engaged with the public, awareness of China’s crimes would rise. But as they shared their appreciation for the challenges of development and for China’s accomplishments, so would Americans’ understanding. In the long run, China would be so much better off.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  12. #137
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    More sanctions then, seems the best way eh.

  13. #138
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    The fate of estimated up to one million people is unknown and most of the detainees’ families have been kept in the dark.



    China has intensified its campaign of mass internment, intrusive surveillance, political indoctrination and forced cultural assimilation against the region’s Uighurs, Kazakhs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic groups.


    Amnesty International has interviewed more than 100 people outside of China whose relatives in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region (XUAR) are still missing, as well as individuals who said they were tortured while in detention camps there.


    The internment of predominantly Muslim ethnic groups in the XUAR intensified after highly restrictive and discriminatory “Regulations on De-extremification” were adopted in March 2017.


    Open or even private displays of religious and cultural affiliation, including growing an “abnormal” beard, wearing a veil or headscarf, regular prayer, fasting or avoidance of alcohol, or possessing books or articles about Islam or Uighur culture can be considered “extremist” under the regulation.


    Travel abroad for work or education, particularly to majority Muslim countries, or contact with people outside China are also major reasons for suspicion. Male, female; young, old; urban, rural, all are at risk of being detained.


    The ubiquitous security checks that are now a routine part of daily life for all in the XUAR provide ample opportunity to search mobile phones for suspicious content or check people’s identities using facial recognition software.


    Individuals might come under suspicion through routine monitoring of messages sent on social media apps like WeChat, which does not use end-to-end encryption. Use of alternative messaging apps with encryption, such as WhatsApp, can also be a cause for detention.


    Syrlas Kalimkhan said he installed WhatsApp on his father’s phone and tested it by texting, “Hi, Dad.” Later, the police asked his father, Kalimkhan Aitkal, 53, a farmer, why he had WhatsApp on his phone. He was later sent to a “re-education camp”.


    The authorities label the camps as centres for “transformation-through-education” but most people refer to them simply as “re-education camps”. Those sent to such camps are not put on trial, have no access to lawyers or right to challenge the decision. Individuals could be left to languish in detention for months, as it is the authorities who decide when an individual has been “transformed”.


    Kairat Samarkan was sent to a detention camp in October 2017, after he returned to the XUAR following a short visit to neighbouring Kazakhstan.


    Kairat told Amnesty that he was hooded, made to wear shackles on his arms and legs and was forced to stand in a fixed position for 12 hours when first detained. There were nearly 6,000 people held in the same camp, where they were forced to sing political songs and study speeches of the Chinese Communist Party. They could not talk to each other and were forced to chant “Long live Xi Jinping” before meals. Kairat told Amnesty that his treatment drove him to attempt suicide just before his release.


    Those who resist or fail to show enough progress face punishments ranging from verbal abuse to food deprivation, solitary confinement, beatings and use of restraints and stress positions. There have been reports of deaths inside the facilities, including suicides of those unable to bear the mistreatment.


    The authorities justify the extreme measures as necessary to prevent religious “extremism” and “terrorist activities”, and to ensure “ethnic unity” and national security. While states do have the right and responsibility to prevent violent attacks, the measures deployed must be necessary and proportionate and as narrow and targeted as possible to address a specific threat. There is no plausible justification for mass detentions of members of a particular ethnic group or religion of the type witnessed in the XUAR.


    “So-called ‘re-education camps’ are places of brainwashing, torture and punishment that hark back to the darkest hours of the Mao-era, when anyone suspected of not being loyal enough to the state or the Chinese Communist Party could end up in China’s notorious labour camps. Members of predominately Muslim ethnic minority groups are living in permanent fear for themselves and for their detained relatives,” said Nicholas Bequelin, Amnesty International’s East Asia Director.


    For months, relatives of the missing kept their anguish to themselves. They hoped the loss of contact with loved ones back home would be temporary. They feared making things worse if they sought outside help, since the Chinese government views contact with relatives living abroad as suspect, and, in some cases, grounds for detention in “re-education camps”. Now, with no clear end in sight for their torment, more and more are willing to speak up.


    Bota Kussaiyn, an ethnic Kazakh student studying at Moscow State University, last spoke with her father, Kussaiyn Sagymbai, over WeChat in November 2017. Originally from the XUAR, their family had re-settled in Kazakhstan in 2013.


    Bota’s father had returned to China in late 2017 to visit a doctor, but the authorities confiscated his passport after he arrived in the XUAR. Bota subsequently learnt from relatives there that her father had been sent to a “re-education camp”.


    Her relatives in the XUAR were so afraid that further contact might put them under suspicion that they stopped communicating with her after that.


    Bota told Amnesty: “My father is an ordinary citizen. We were a happy family before he was detained. We laughed together. We can’t laugh any more, and we can’t sleep at night. We live in fear every day. It has done great harm to my mother. We don’t know where he is. We don’t even know if he’s still alive. I want to see my father again.”


    Many relatives and friends abroad report that the situation is making them feel responsible and “guilty” for the fate of their relatives, because it seems to be precisely these overseas connections that in many cases are causing their loved ones in the XUAR to fall under suspicion. The authorities accuse them of having ties to outside groups the Chinese government alleges promote “extremist” religious views or plot “terrorist activity”. The real purpose, though, seems to be the enforcement of an information blackout about the current crackdown against ethnic minorities in the XUAR.


    To avoid arousing such suspicion, Uighurs, Kazakhs and others inside the XUAR have reportedly been cutting all ties with friends and family living outside China. They warn acquaintances not to call and delete outside contacts from social media applications. Unable to get reliable information from home, many living abroad inevitably fear the worst.


    https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2018/09/china-up-to-one-million-detained/

  14. #139
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  15. #140
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    I hope this trend doesn't spread to the west, it would lead to more selective memory loss.

    The west would never allow social scoring, 24/7 monitoring of society, embracement without due process, people being murdered on the street for social subterfuge, being stripped of one's online presence............

    Only in Asia eh?


  16. #141
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    The Loving Heart Kindergarten in Hotan, in a 2018 photo


    Interview: ‘The Situation in Our Country is Beyond Inhumane’

    Adil Abduqadir, an ethnic Uyghur living in exile, left his home in Hotan (in Chinese, Hetian) prefecture, in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR), for Turkey with his wife in March last year to avoid a forced abortion because she was pregnant with their fifth child, in violation of the country’s “family planning policy.” A month later, authorities in the XUAR began jailing and detaining Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas in political “re-education camps” throughout the region, where members of the ethnic group have long complained of pervasive discrimination, religious repression, and cultural suppression under Chinese rule. When Abduqadir learned of the new policy in the XUAR, he chose not to return home, where he and his wife were likely to face persecution and arrest.

    In a recent interview, Abduqadir told RFA’s Uyghur Service that since he left China, his mother was handed a 10-year jail sentence, his older brother was imprisoned for five and a half years, and his four other children were sent to Hotan’s so-called Loving Heart Kindergarten for Uyghur youth whose guardians have been detained, which they are not free to leave. He has since established a campaign to free his children and those of other Uyghurs in the XUAR, noting that mass incarcerations have made the destruction of families an all too common occurrence in the region.


    INTERVIEW HERE. https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018134155.html
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