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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    I do wonder about the exact details of how they re-educate Uyghurs.

    maybe along the line as when the BiB gently persuade a suspect to confess

  2. #102
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    Particularly Burmese

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    I do wonder about the exact details of how they re-educate Uyghurs.


    How Xi Jinping tackled radicalism in Xinjiang

    The scourge of extremism, which had hit Xinjiang in 2009 and later in 2014 is now diminishing because of the measures taken by the Central Government of China

    S M Hali May 12, 2018

    "Xinjiang is a province in Western China. It is the country’s largest province, occupying 16 percent of China’s surface area, and has the country’s largest population of Muslims. In the past, China’s eastern provinces enjoyed greater opulence and a higher rate of development, perhaps because they are closer to the coastal region and ports. However, this disparity caused Xinjiang’s population to face a sense of deprivation, which was manipulated by China’s detractors, who tried to incite the Muslim population, ethnic Uighurs, into insurgency.

    President Xi Jinping quelled the insurgency with a two pronged policy. Security forces cracked down on the troublemakers with an iron hand, while development projects with the inclusion of Uighurs ushered an era of prosperity. The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) or the New Silk Road, which promises a new age of affluence, has Xinjiang as its focal point. The flagship BRI project, the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) terminates at Xinjiang’s ancient city of Kashgar, which was a major city of the ancient Silk Road and has become BRI’s launching pad into Central Asia and beyond.
    The steps taken by both the central government and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region to dispel a sense of deprivation, promote conventions of religious beliefs and conduct an era of harmony is remarkable.

    I have been visiting Xinjiang for the past four decades and am a witness to its various stages of development. From a sleepy backwater of the 1970s, Urumqi has become a sprawling metropolis, with high-rise buildings, busy roads, marketplaces and shopping malls. A network for underground Metro trains and high-speed railways is reaching the final stages of completion.

    Currently I am touring Xinjiang as a guest of the BRI to delve deep into its core and feel the pulse of this massive project. A detailed tour of the Xinjiang Islamic Institute and discussions with AdudulrekepTumniaz, President of the Institute and deputy director of Xinjiang Islamic Association was very reassuring. The Institute is 28 years old and has came a long way. My previous visit was in 2011 and since then, a new campus with modern class rooms, an impressive mosque, well equipped library, cosy dormitories and state of the art sports facilities has been completed in 2017, which can compete with any modern western university.

    To combat radicalism,security forces cracked down on the troublemakers with an iron hand, while development projects with the inclusion of Uighurs ushered an era of prosperity

    The Chinese constitution ensures freedom of religion and Islam is no exception, however, western critics and detractors of China have been spreading rumours about the practice of Islam being curtailed. Since extremists have been distorting the tenets of Islam, quoting verses out of context and leading the faithful astray with their particular brand of religion to fulfil their heinous designs, the Islamic Institute has picked up the cudgel to produce scholars and religious teachers who can become Imams in various mosques and University Professors and teachers as well as research scholars to guide the faithful and protect them from extremism.

    The Bachelor’s Degree being conferred upon the Islamic Scholars from the Institute — which numbers around 1200 per year — is spread over five years. Imbibed with the knowledge of Islam, equipped with the wherewithal to take up the responsibility of guiding others, these graduates have an open mind and are well versed in technology science, social studies and current international affairs to meet the challenge head on.

    The scourge of extremism, which had hit Xinjiang in 2009 and later in 2014 is now diminishing because of the measures taken by the Central Government of China and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region are bearing fruit. Security is tight; vigilance is efficient and more effective because the physical, financial and moral well-being of the citizens is being guarded. More opportunities for education, vocational training, employment opportunities and religious freedom are producing healthy students. Young boys and girls especially from the less developed and impoverished regions are being afforded the opportunity to study in state of the art boarding schools, where they are being provided quality education, mastery over arts, sciences, languages and extracurricular activities at state expense to complete high school and gain admission in inland institutions of higher learning.

    Facilities for practicing religion are also being enhanced. Modern and well equipped mosques, slaughter houses where halal meat can be procured or the Eid-ul-Azha rituals practiced and support in pilgrimage are paying rich dividends. The government is ensuring that pilgrims for Hajj and Umrah are provided logistic support, while spiritual education and respect for the rights of the faithful is maintained. Medical facilities, which were redundant in Xinjiang once upon a time, have now been established to a level which is unprecedented. Traditional as well as conventional medicine is offered to the urban as well as rural dwellers with the additional advantage of telemedicine, on concessional or gratis basis.

    With such a heavy investment, financially, spiritually and morally, there is no way the detractors of China can lead the faithful astray any longer.
    The writer is a retired Group Captain of PAF. He is a columnist, analyst and TV talk show host, who has authored six books on current affairs, including three on China"

    https://dailytimes.com.pk/238763/how...m-in-xinjiang/


    A different opinion to the RFA version, 40+ articles by MK, postulated here. Can't she find anyone else other than BBC? Seems like a one trick operation. How high up the food chain does it go?

    My only reservation is the author admits openly that:

    "Currently I am touring Xinjiang as a guest of the BRI to delve deep into its core and feel the pulse of this massive project."

    Whether it influences his article I'll leave up to you to decide. Whether the institutions he discusses and their operations are facts or illusions I'll leave up to you to confirm or deny.

    Whether the team at RFA/CIA/0.001% members/ameristani social comment forums/HM Governments mouthpiece BBC can disrupt his opinions being read by having their social media vassals stop him publishing, is yet to be determined.

    But then he is Asian, does an Asian's opinions matter?
    Last edited by OhOh; 21-08-2018 at 04:15 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  4. #104
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    China Expels BuzzFeed Journalist Who Reported on Mass Detentions, Surveillance

    China’s decision to effectively expel a BuzzFeed journalist who won a human rights award for her reporting on the mass incarceration of Uyghurs and other Muslims in “re-education” camps has refocused attention on an unfolding human rights crisis in its northwestern region of Xinjiang, a press freedom group has said.


    The decision by China’s foreign ministry not to renew the visa of BuzzFeed's China bureau chief, Megha Rajagopalan, came after she carried out extensive investigative reporting into heavy surveillance measures in Xinjiang, and the use of huge camps to detain Uyghurs and other minority groups for “re-education,” the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) said in a statement.


    Rajagopalan wrote via her Twitter account: “In May, China's Foreign Ministry declined to issue me a new journalist visa,” she said. “They say this is a process thing; we are not totally clear why.”


    “I also want to make clear that though I can't do it from inside China anymore; I'm not going to stop reporting on and speaking about state surveillance, repression and incarceration of millions of Muslim ethnic minorities in Xinjiang,” she wrote.


    Rajagopalan, who had covered Asia for BuzzFeed News since 2016, had won a 2018 Human Rights Press Award for her report on Xinjiang's heavy surveillance measures and re-education camps, the CPJ said.


    "Denying a visa to BuzzFeed reporter Megha Rajagopalan is a transparent attempt to stifle news coverage of how China treats the [Uyghur] population of Xinjiang," the CPJ’s Asia program coordinator Steven Butler said in a statement on the group’s website.


    "If Chinese authorities truly believe their insistence that they are not committing human rights violations in Xinjiang, they should open the door for more journalists to freely report on the issue,” Butler said.


    Meanwhile, the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China (FCCC) called on ruling Chinese Communist Party officials to make public their reasons “for effectively ejecting a credentialed foreign journalist from China."



    Others forced to leave


    Rajagopalan is the latest in a string of outspoken foreign journalists to be forced to leave China by the authorities after covering “sensitive” topics.


    In December 2015, China’s foreign ministry refused to renew the working visa of a French journalist who angered Beijing by writing an article critical of its policies in Xinjiang.


    Ursula Gauthier, the Beijing-based correspondent for French news magazine L'Obs, had "flagrantly championed acts of terrorism and acts of cruelly killing innocents," the foreign ministry said.

    Gauthier meanwhile said she had done no such thing.


    Gauthier had suggested that a string of violent incidents in Xinjiang could be the result of oppressive policies, and questioned China's motives in expressing sympathy for the victims of the Nov. 13, 2015, attacks in Paris.


    In May 2015, Qatar-based satellite channel Al Jazeera closed its English-language Beijing bureau after Chinese officials revoked its correspondent's visa and refused to allow a replacement journalist.


    Melissa Chan, Al Jazeera English's China correspondent from 2007-2015, had covered numerous stories about the environment, social justice, labor rights, and human rights.


    A survey carried out by the FCCC at the start of the year found that 40 percent of China-based journalists felt reporting conditions in 2017 had deteriorated from the year before, compared with 29 percent in the FCCC’s 2016 survey.


    Reporting grew more difficult in many areas of China, but in particular Xinjiang, China’s westernmost region, the survey found.


    It said 73 percent of respondents who traveled to Xinjiang in 2017 were told by officials and security agents that reporting was prohibited or restricted, compared with 42 percent in 2016, the group said in an annual report in January.


    It said 15 percent of respondents said they encountered problems during the visa renewal process, compared with just six percent in the previous year, and twice the number of respondents said their problems were related to the content of their reporting.


    Correspondents also reported higher levels of concern about surveillance and invasion of privacy, as well as greater pressure by overseas Chinese officials on media organization headquarters, it said.



    'Orwellian police state called Xinjiang'


    Earlier this month, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) expressed concerns over China’s mass internment of ethnic Uyghurs and restrictions on their religious freedom.


    The panel said it was "deeply concerned" by reports that China “has turned [Xinjiang] into something that resembles a massive internment camp that is shrouded in secrecy” in the name of eradicating “religious extremism” and “maintaining social stability.”


    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in political “re-education camps” throughout the region.


    A recent editorial in the ruling party-affiliated Global Times dismissed international coverage of the Xinjiang re-education camps, which it labeled “training institutes,” saying western media outlets were incorrectly labeling them as “detention” sites and “baselessly criticizing China’s human rights.”


    Aside from the brief mention in the article, China's central government authorities have not publicly acknowledged the existence of political re-education camps in Xinjiang, and the number of inmates kept in each facility remains a closely guarded secret.


    But in interviews with RFA, local officials in many parts of the region have described sending significant numbers of Uyghurs to the camps and even described overcrowding in some facilities.


    Dolkun Isa, the president of the Munich-based World Uyghur Congress (WUC) exile group, called Rajagopalan's visa denial "a shining example of how much China fears Western media reporting on CCP's brutal rule in East Turkestan, especially the high-tech surveillance state it crated and the extrajudicial incarceration of one million Uyghurs."

    "Western governments should make it clear to China that this is unacceptable and there will be reciprocal consequences," he told RFA in an email.

    "Western media should also make it clear to China that they will continue to shine a light on the Orwellian police state called Xinjiang," added Isa.



    Reported by Pan Jiaqing for RFA’s Cantonese Service, by Xi Wang for the Mandarin Service, and by Alim Seytoff for the Uyghur Service.


    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/chi...018115500.html

  5. #105
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    As we should all understand as a foreigner, were are accepted as guests until we're not. Visas can be cancelled/stopped on an immigration officers whim and forced to leave a country. Many countries have similar rules.

    Possibly even civilised western ones, with democratically elected governments to boot.


  6. #106
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    Muslim Governments Silent as China Cracks Down on Uighurs
    Bloomberg News
    by Peter Martin, Karen Leigh, Onur Ant, Archana Chaudhary, Thomas Kutty Abraham, Chris Kay, Yudith Ho, and Vivian Nereim

    August 31, 2018, 4:00 AM



    • Most nations maintain close economic, trade ties with Beijing
    • UN expert says up to 1 million Muslims in ‘re-education’ camps



    Ethnic Uyghur men at a local market in Kashgar. Photographer: Kevin Frayer/Getty ImagesAs calls grow in the U.S. and Europe to pressure China to halt alleged human-rights abuses against its Muslim minority, Beijing has so far escaped any serious criticism from governments across the Islamic world.

    Almost three weeks after a United Nations official cited “credible reports” that the country was holding as many as 1 million Turkic-speaking Uighurs in “re-education” camps, governments in Muslim-majority countries have issued no notable statements on the issue. The silence became more pronounced this week after a bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers urged sanctions against senior Chinese officials.

    “We are hopeful that the State Department will seek addition opportunities to condemn these abuses while also undertaking robust diplomatic engagement with like-minded governments to further elevate this human rights crisis in international forums and multilateral institutions,” lawmakers led by Senator Marco Rubio of Florida and Representative Chris Smith of New Jersey wrote Wednesday in a letter to Secretary of State Michael Pompeo and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. They joined European Union officials who have previously expressed concern about the camps in Xinjiang.

    By contrast, the leaders of Indonesia, Malaysia and Pakistan haven’t released public statements on the clampdown. Neither has Saudi Arabia. Even Turkey, which has in the past offered favorable policies to Turkic-speaking groups and hosts a small Uighur population of its own, remained silent as Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan grappled with an economic crisis.

    Trade Ties

    The split underscores how China’s position as a key trading partner and aid provider to many Muslim-majority nations -- as well as its longstanding policy to avoid commenting on the internal affairs of other countries -- is now paying off. The alleged abuses are also occurring in one of China’s most remote and heavily policed frontiers, making it hard to acquire first-hand evidence, such as photos and videos, that might sway public opinion in the Islamic world.


    Chinese military police attending an anti-terrorist oath-taking rally in Hetian in Feb. 2017.

    Photographer: AFP via Getty Images
    “China generally has friendly relations with most Muslim countries, mostly around trade,” said Hassan Hassan, senior fellow at the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy, a Washington think tank. The Muslim world is largely unaware of the situation in Xinjiang, he added. “It’s not covered almost at all in Arabic media, and even jihadis don’t dwell on it as much as they do about other conflicts.”
    China officially denies problems in Xinjiang, a vast region the size of Alaska bordering Pakistan and Afghanistan that’s home to some 10 million Uighurs. On Thursday, Beijing warned the U.S. lawmakers not to interfere in its internal affairs.

    “The policies and equal rights that Chinese minorities enjoy are far better than in the U.S., which has lot issues with racism and human rights protection,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a briefing in Beijing. The lawmakers should focus on issues at home “instead of interfering in other countries’ internal politics, playing judges on human rights and casting blame, or even threatening to impose unreasonable sanctions,” she said.
    ‘Strike First’

    The UN’s Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination said in a report released Thursday that estimates of the number of Xinjiang residents held in camps ranged from the tens of thousands to upwards of one million. The panel called for an immediate halt to the detentions, the release of those already held and an official investigation into allegations of racial and religious profiling.

    China’s clampdown has been fueled by President Xi Jinping’s orders to “strike first” against Islamist extremism following deadly attacks in the region involving Uighurs, and reports that some members of the minority were fighting alongside terror groups in Syria. A Communist Party-run newspaper has rebuked criticism of the crackdown, arguing that it had prevented Xinjiang from becoming another Syria.


    Rohingya boys play in Kutupalong camp, Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh on Aug. 28.

    Photographer: Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
    The silence on Uighurs contrasts with outrage last year when some 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fled clearance operations by the Myanmar military, which the UN has since likened to genocide. One big difference between the two cases: Myanmar’s economy is 180 times smaller than that of China, which is the top trading partner of 20 of the 57 member states of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.
    China accounts for about a 10th of Saudi Arabia’s oil exports and roughly a third of Iran’s, according to ship-tracking data compiled by Bloomberg. It is Malaysia’s top source of foreign investment. And it has ensured the flow of more than $60 billion in loans for China-Pakistan Economic Corridor infrastructure projects.
    Muslim nations “don’t want to damage their relations with China, and consider China a potential ally against the West and the U.S., and therefore they are trying to stay silent,” said Omer Kanat, chairman of the executive committee at the World Uyghur Congress, an overseas Uighur advocacy group.

    Over the years, these governments have vocally opposed U.S. slights of Muslims, including President Donald Trump’s 2017 ban on travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. Iranian foreign minister Javad Zarif called it “a great gift to extremists.”

    An expert testifying before a United Nations human rights panel on Aug. 10 cited reports that Beijing may be holding up to one million Uighurs in re-education camps. Bloomberg reported in January on the government conducting experiments with facial recognition technology in the region.
    The governments of Turkey, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Malaysia, Kazakhstan, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt did not respond to requests to comment for this story. Multiple phone calls to the OIC for comment were not answered.


    Indonesian Muslims protest the treatment of Rohingya ethnic group in Myanmar, in Jakarta in Sept. 2017.

    Photographer: Ed Wray/Getty Images
    Dangerous Spillover

    To be sure, maintaining trade ties isn’t the only motivator. Some governments are loathe to draw global attention to their own shabby human rights records. Beijing has largely refrained from involving itself in conflicts in the Muslim world.
    Those nations “don’t particularly respect human rights themselves, so it’s hard to imagine that they would jump at an opportunity to criticize China,” said David Brophy, Senior Lecturer in Modern Chinese History at the University of Sydney.
    Still, it could prove increasingly difficult to maintain their silence, as China’s policies in Xinjiang spill across its borders.


    Police officers stand guard in Kashgar, Xinjiang province.

    Photographer: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images
    In Kazakhstan -- a neighboring economic partner key to Xi’s signature Belt and Road trade initiative -- an undocumented, ethnic-Kazakh Chinese citizen recently testified to being forced to teach in a camp before escaping. Kazakh authorities, risking Beijing’s anger, allowed her to remain.

    The incident shows that the crackdown is starting to seep into China’s foreign relations, said James Millward, a professor at Georgetown University and author of “Eurasian Crossroads: A History of Xinjiang.”
    “What we’re seeing is the policy effects of a shift in philosophy with regard to cultural diversity and ethnic diversity in China,” he said.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd
    Care to reply to these points, my liege?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    As calls grow
    From an amerstani financial source. Whose income is determined by government controlled rating agencies and government controlled social media "opinion".

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    after a United Nations officia cites credible reportsl
    One can imagine many "credible" reports being "incredible to others.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    governments in Muslim-majority countries have issued no notable statements on the issue.
    One wonders who understands their people better, their own governments or western ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    a bipartisan group of U.S. lawmakers urged sanctions against senior Chinese officials.
    Sanctions eh, how novel.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    international forums and multilateral institutions
    ameristani doesn't do either.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    They joined European Union officials
    Elected or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    The split underscores how China’s position as a key trading partner and aid provider to many Muslim-majority nations -- as well as its longstanding policy to avoid commenting on the internal affairs of other countries -- is now paying off.
    I suspect some are tired of being bombed, physically or financially.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    making it hard to acquire first-hand evidence, such as photos and videos,
    So let's ask some tame experts for the numbers that make our assertions "credible".

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    even jihadis don’t dwell on it as much as they do about other conflicts.
    Keeping their benefactors safe from public shame.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    The lawmakers should focus on issues at home “instead of interfering in other countries’ internal politics, playing judges on human rights and casting blame, or even threatening to impose unreasonable sanctions,” she said.
    ameristan's only interaction, threats and actual bombing.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    estimates of the number of Xinjiang residents held in camps ranged from the tens of thousands to upwards of one million.
    Are the "experts" at loggerheads with each other?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    to “strike first” against Islamist extremism following deadly attacks in the region involving Uighurs, and reports that some members of the minority were fighting alongside terror groups in Syria.
    Or do an ameristan, fund the terroist whilst useful and then renage on promises, a much more lucrative option for it's politicians and MIC.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Rohingya boys play in Kutupalong camp, Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh on Aug. 28.
    Whereas of course back in Myanmar they all had seashore villas with Bangladeshi servants eh?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    which the UN has since likened to genocide.
    But not the millions forced to flee Syria by the ameristan and it's vassals, throat slitters

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Muslim nations “don’t want to damage their relations with China, and consider China a potential ally against the West and the U.S., and therefore they are trying to stay silent,” said Omer Kanat, chairman of the executive committee at the World Uyghur Congress, an overseas Uighur advocacy group
    We are to beleive government officials or religious leaders?

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    An expert testifying before a United Nations human rights panel
    Hopefully more aware than some experts here.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Those nations “don’t particularly respect human rights themselves, so it’s hard to imagine that they would jump at an opportunity to criticize China,” said David Brophy, Senior Lecturer in Modern Chinese History at the University of Sydney.
    "Those nation", says a representative, dependent on confirming socially acceptable trends, of increasingly racist Oz. Pot calling kettle black?


  8. #108
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    "Re-education camps".

    Must be 10 hours a day of watching cringeworthy Winnie the Pooh videos.


  9. #109
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    No, the UN Did Not Report China Has ‘Massive Internment Camps’ for Uighur Muslims

    "Media outlets from Reuters to The Intercept falsely claimed the UN had condemned China for holding a million Uighurs in camps. The claim is based on unsourced allegations by two independent commission members, US-funded outfits and a shadowy opposition group.

    Numerous major media outlets, from Reuters to The Intercept, have claimed that the United Nations has reports that the Chinese government is holding as many as 1 million Uighur Muslims in “internment camps.” But a close examination of these news stories, and of the evidence behind them — or the lack thereof — demonstrates that the extraordinary claim is simply not true.

    A spokesperson from the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) confirmed in a statement to the Grayzone that the allegation of Chinese “camps” was not made by the United Nations, but rather by a member of an independent committee that does not speak for the UN as a whole. That member happened to be the only American on the committee, and one with no background of scholarship or research on China.

    In an email to the Grayzone Project, OHCHR spokesperson Julia Gronnevet confirmed that the CERD was not representative of the UN as a whole.

    “You are correct that the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is an independent body,” Gronnevet wrote. “Quoted comments were made during public sessions of the Committee when members were reviewing State parties.”


    Poor journalism or propaganda for the sheeple, you decide. Did any of the sources bother with the official UN press statement or blindly follow others without fact checking?

    Much, much more here:
    It appears, according to an official UN spokesxxx that all the MSM reports were fake. Many posters here continued to use the fake reporting and numbers as facts.
    Looks like some here need to examine their prefered "sources" more closely.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    BEIJING – China rejected on Monday allegations raised by a U.N. panel that over a million Uighurs may be held in internment camps in the restive Xinjiang region, .....
    Fake

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    China’s decision to effectively expel a BuzzFeed journalist who won a human rights award for her reporting on the mass incarceration of Uyghurs and other Muslims in “re-education” camps .....

    ......came after she carried out extensive investigative reporting into heavy surveillance measures in Xinjiang, and the use of huge camps to detain Uyghurs and other minority groups for “re-education,”

    .......incarceration of millions of Muslim ethnic minorities in Xinjiang,” she wrote.
    Fake

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    UN expert says up to 1 million Muslims in ‘re-education’ camps
    Fake

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Almost three weeks after a United Nations official cited “credible reports” that the country was holding as many as 1 million Turkic-speaking Uighurs in “re-education” camps,.....
    Fake

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    The UN’s Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination said in a report released Thursday that estimates of the number of Xinjiang residents held in camps ranged from the tens of thousands to upwards of one million. The panel called for an immediate halt to
    Fake

  10. #110
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    Firstly, you're a fucking idiot posting bullshit from "globalresearch.ca" which is a known whackjob website.

    Secondly, you're a fucking idiot posting a UN report that states:

    The Rapporteur reiterated the concern expressed in 2016 by the Committee against Torture about cases of torture, deaths in custody, arbitrary detention and disappearance of Tibetans, Uyghurs and Mongolians. Would China impartially investigate officials implicated in such cases and bring them to justice?
    Which clearly expresses the concerns the UN has about China's policies to try and stamp out any free expression or cultural identity.

    You toadying sychophant.

    Stop brown nosing the chinkies, you're making a prize arse of yourself.

  11. #111
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^^FAKE. What a load of hog wash.

    First, what was reported from Reuters.

    U.N. says it has credible reports that China holds million Uighurs in secret camps


    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-c...-idUSKBN1KV1SU

    Gay McDougall is a member of the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. She works for the U.N.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inte...Discrimination

    Check out the site.

    https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/CE...embership.aspx

    Why do you reckon she’s shady? Looks to have good credentials to others. Very well respected lawyer.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_McDougall

    https://www.americanbar.org/publicat...mcdougall.html

    From your own link.

    GAY MCDOUGALL, Committee Co-Rapporteur for China, raised concern about the numerous and credible reports that in the name of combatting “religious extremism” and maintaining “social stability”, the State party had turned the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region into something that resembled a massive internment camp shrouded in secrecy, a “no rights zone”, while members of the Xinjiang Uyghur minority, along with others who were identified as Muslim, were being treated as enemies of the State based on nothing more than their ethno-religious identity. The Co-Rapporteur noted reports of mass detention of ethnic Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslim minorities, and estimates that upwards of a million people were being held in so-called counter-extremism centres and another two million had been forced into so-called “re-education camps” for political and cultural indoctrination. All the detainees had their due process rights violated, while most had never been charged with an offense, tried in a court of law, or afforded an opportunity to challenge the legality of their detention.

    Reports further indicated, continued Ms. McDougal, that the State party was making even the most common-placed expressions of ethno-religious significance to Muslims into a penal offence, including daily greetings, possession of certain Halal products, and growing a full beard or wearing a full-face headscarf. Recent amendments to the legal framework appeared designed to enable even greater control of Xinjiang Uyghur and other minority groups; the Criminal Law amendments, the National Security Law of 2015, the Counter-Terrorism Law of 2016, the Cybersecurity Law of 2017, and the Religious Affairs Regulations Law amended in 2018, established imprecise and too broad definitions on national security offences related to “terrorism” and “extremism” that enabled abusive, arbitrary and discriminative prosecution and conviction.


    Have you any proof Julie Gronnevet is the official spokesperson for the UN?

  12. #112
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    The Truth comes only from a communist politburo or a friendly Putin site.

  13. #113
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^^^^ Nearly forgot this.

    Buzzfeed journalist denied new China visa following award-winning coverage of Xinjiang crackdown

    Buzzfeed’s China bureau chief Megha Rajagopalan has been forced to leave China after her journalism visa application was denied by the authorities without explanation.


    Rajagopalan had been covering Asia since 2012 and has reported extensively on the crackdown in Xinjiang, a western region of China populated by Muslim.



    MORE
    https://www.hongkongfp.com/2018/08/2...ang-crackdown/

    AND 22nd Human Rights Press Awards winners | Human Rights Press Awards


    The story which won the prize.

    This Is What A 21st-Century Police State Really Looks Like

    Far from the booming metropolis of Beijing, China is building a sprawling system that combines dystopian technology and human policing. “It’s a kind of frontline laboratory for surveillance.”

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...ere#.vu4zllx3p

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermantheGerman View Post
    The Truth comes only from a communist politburo or a friendly Putin site.
    Or Chinese state controlled media.


  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    No, the UN Did Not Report China Has ‘Massive Internment Camps’ for Uighur Muslims
    Writes a post that says the UN did not mention internment camps.

    Includes a link where the UN mentions internment camps.

    The Co-Rapporteur noted reports of mass detention of ethnic Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslim minorities, and estimates that upwards of a million people were being held in so-called counter-extremism centres and another two million had been forced into so-called “re-education camps” for political and cultural indoctrination.
    What a fucking bozo.


  16. #116
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Dear OhOh,

    may I remind you:

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Ignorant savage, pick a topic you know something about and can argue from a position of knowledge. Your statements here are childish.
    Whenever you write about China, Communists, Putin, or some dictator that is farting right now PLEASE THNK TWICE ! Maybe even consider holding your breath until some real knowledge or common sense pops into your brain (might take years ).

  17. #117
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    Glad you all took the time to comment. Thanks.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Glad you all took the time to comment. Thanks.
    No, thank you for the comedy gold.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Glad you all took the time to comment.
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    No, thank you for the comedy gold
    ...and all the virtual manure that makes our forum threads grow...

  20. #120
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    Trump considering sanctions on China over Muslim detention camps

    The Trump administration is weighing whether to slap sanctions on the Chinese government for detaining hundreds of thousands of ethnic Uighurs and other minority Muslims in internment camps, current and former American officials told the New York Times.


    Why it matters: As the Trump administration battles China on trade, Beijing’s human rights violations in Xinjiang have largely been sidelined amid resistance from President Trump. A move to sanction officials over the issue would be one of the first times the administration has engaged China on human rights. Officials are also reportedly considering imposing limits on American sales of surveillance technology that Chinese security agencies and companies are using to surveil Uighurs in northwest China.

    https://www.axios.com/tag/china/

  21. #121
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    Pot calling kettle black.

    How immature for a government's officers to engage in such childish behaviour.

    I'm positive China and many other countries laugh as much as these two countries leaders out for a meal:

    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Pot calling kettle black.

    How immature for a government's officers to engage in such childish behaviour.

    I'm positive China and many other countries laugh as much as these two countries leaders out for a meal:

    My we are waffling tonight aren't we.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    we are waffling tonight
    ...only need the chicken...

  24. #124
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    Interview: 'The U.S. is Taking The Issue of The Concentration Camps Quite Seriously'

    2018-09-11




    Dolkun Isa (L), the president of the Munich-based World Uyghur Congress (WUC) and Omer Kanat, chairman of the WUC Executive Committee, at the White House in Washington, Sept. 10, 2018.WUC.







    Dolkun Isa, the president of the Munich-based World Uyghur Congress (WUC) and Omer Kanat, chairman of the WUC Executive Committee, paid a brief visit to Washington on Monday, amid growing U.S. government concern for the Chinese government’s treatment of the roughly 11 million Uyghurs living in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR). The United Nations, human rights groups and independent experts estimate that China is holding a million Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas in political re-education camps in the XUAR. The camps, whose existence China has indirectly acknowledged while claiming they are vocational training facilities and disputing the numbers incarcerated, has prompted calls by U.S. lawmakers for targeted sanctions against select Chinese government officials. On Tuesday, the New York Times reported that The Trump administration is considering sanctions against Chinese senior officials and companies to punish Beijing's detention of Uyghurs and other minority Muslims in internment camps. Alim Seytoff, director of RFA’s Uyghur Service, spoke to the two leaders of the Munich-based WUC, which lobbies for the interests of Uyghurs, after their discussions at the White House about the situation in Xinjiang. Isa, 51, learned in July that his mother died on May 17 at the age of 78 in one of the camps. He refers to Xinjiang as East Turkestan, the Uyghurs’ preferred name for their homeland.



    RFA: What is the purpose of your sudden trip to Washington?

    Isa: I was invited to meet with high-level officials in the White House to discuss the latest situation in East Turkestan and address the questions they have.


    RFA: Did you request the meeting with the White House or vice versa?

    Isa: We did request meetings several times in the past. But this time I came to meet with them at their request.

    RFA: So did you mostly discuss the detention of one million Uyghurs people in China’s political reeducation camps?

    Isa: Yes, the most important discussion was about the detention of one million Uyghurs in China’s concentration camps. I am very pleased that the White House is deeply concerned with Uyghur detentions in the camps. I am deeply grateful for the concerns expressed by the White House, U.S. Congress and NGOs over the tragic situation of the Uyghur people. I did express our appreciation to the repeated expressions of concerns over the camps issue by Vice President (mike) Pence, Secretary of State (Mike) Pompeo and members of Congress. I am glad the U.S. is taking the issue of the concentration camps quite seriously.

    RFA: Apparently, the U.S. is taking the lead in expressing its concerns over the detention of one million Uyghurs by the Chinese authorities. Like you stated, high-level U.S. officials including Vice President Pence, Secretary of State Pompeo and U.S. Ambassador to UN Nikki Haley raised this issue. Members of Congress held a hearing on this issue and penned two letters expressing their concerns and urging sanctions on Chinese officials. You’ve been to the European Parliament and met with European officials a few times now. Are similar concerns are being expressed by European officials taking the cue from the American officials?

    Isa: The European officials are seriously interested in the issue of the camps and gravely concerned. Last week, I met with officials at the European Parliament and European Commission as well as officials from Belgium and Germany. We briefed them on the expressions of concern and actions taken by the U.S. administration and Congress. We requested that they take similar measures. We were also reassured by the officials of the European Parliament and European governments that they would raise this issue with their Chinese counterparts during bilateral dialogues and meetings. I am confident that there will be certain measures taken by the European Parliament and European Commission in the coming weeks.

    RFA: At the moment, the U.S. government and the European governments are expressing serious concerns and putting pressure on China. But how do you see Turkey, and Arab and other Muslim countries that remain silent on this issue?

    Isa: This is deeply disappointing. The reason is the Uyghur people in East Turkestan are a Turkic Muslim people. The vast majority of the Uyghur people have been detained in China’s concentration camps for religious reasons. Under such circumstances, the Muslim countries should take this issue more seriously and express more sympathy to us than Western nations. Sadly, we have not seen any interest or expression of concern over this issue by a single Muslim country. Not only have they kept their silence. But the painful truth is, as we have witnessed many times at the UN, some Muslim countries, like Pakistan, are not only turning a blind eye to the suffering of Uyghur Muslims, but they have consistently supported the Chinese government’s position. This is indeed disappointing.

    RFA: The New York Times has reported that the U.S. is weighing sanctions on Chinese officials. What is your comment on this, if the U.S.
    indeed sanctions Chinese officials such as Chen Quanguo and Shohret Zakir?

    Kanat: We have been doing everything to make this happen. These Chinese officials must be sanctioned under the Global Magnitsky Act for committing massive human rights violations against the Uyghur people.

    RFA: Seven Chinese officials, including two Uyghurs--Shohret Zakir and Showket Imin--were identified for sanctions in the letter sent by Senator Marco Rubio along with 16 members of Congress to Secretary Pompeo and Secretary (Steven) Mnuchin. If sanctioned, this will be the first time in history that the U.S. and the West sanctions Uyghur officials, whom many Uyghurs consider to be turncoats, for doing the Chinese Communist Party's work. What kind of message the sanction sends to other Uyghurs who support China's human rights violations against their own Uyghur people both inside and outside China?

    Kanat: The message to such Uyghurs is clear: They will pay a price for cooperating with the Chinese government in violating the human rights of their own Uyghur people. This is symbolic punishment. But it will warn other Uyghurs not to participate in China’s repression of the Uyghur people.

    RFA: If the U.S. government sanctions the seven Chinese officials, what kind of hope does it give to the Uyghur people?

    Kanat: The hope it conveys to the Uyghur people is that humanity has not died and there are those who care about us and our suffering. The international community doesn't just watch our suffering. This will become a tremendous source of hope and light for the Uyghurs who live in total darkness at the moment, due to detentions in the concentration camps. It will give Uyghurs hope that there will be accountability for what China is doing to them. And the U.S. and the West will stand with us. They will not sacrifice us for their economic interests, as some do.


    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018160816.html

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Interview: 'The U.S. is Taking The Issue of The Concentration Camps Quite Seriously'
    And in other news....

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