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  1. #76
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    ameristanis accusing others of human rights atrocities.


  2. #77
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    US Senators Urge Top Diplomat to Raise Concerns With China Over RFA Reporters’ Detained Relatives

    Six U.S. Senators have penned a letter to Washington’s top diplomat, urging pressure on China’s government to provide information about the relatives of reporters with RFA’s Uyghur Service missing in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR), and to free those who have been detained or jailed.

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in re-education camps throughout the XUAR, where members of the ethnic group have long complained of pervasive discrimination, religious repression, and cultural suppression under Chinese rule.

    China is believed to have detained more than two dozen close relatives of six U.S.-based reporters for RFA’s Uyghur Service in apparent retaliation for their coverage of the XUAR.

    In a letter dated July 26, and recently obtained by RFA, Senator Mark Warner of Virginia—the vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence—and five other bipartisan Senators wrote to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to raise concerns about China’s attempts to punish the RFA reporters for their work.

    “RFA’s Uyghur Service journalists, most of them U.S. citizens and residents of Virginia, have relatives in China—including elderly parents—who have been detained, jailed, or forcibly disappeared in what appears to be an act of direct retaliation against these U.S. journalists for their work in exposing the deteriorating human rights situation in the XUAR,” the lawmakers wrote.

    “We are deeply concerned that these cases illustrate that a foreign nation is pursuing extreme measures in an attempt to interfere with Radio Free Asia’s congressionally mandated mission of bringing free press to closed societies.”

    The Senators noted that most of the relatives are believed to be held in the re-education camps which, aside from a brief mention as “training centers” in state media recently, China's central government authorities have not publicly acknowledged the existence of.

    While the number of inmates kept in each facility remains a closely guarded secret, local officials in many parts of the region have in RFA telephone interviews forthrightly described sending significant numbers of Uyghurs to the camps and even described overcrowding in some facilities.

    “In your capacity as the United States’ senior diplomat, we urge you raise this urgent issue in your diplomatic communications with your Chinese counterparts, seek answers as to the whereabouts and well-being of these missing, detained, and jailed relatives, and appeal for these individuals to be unconditionally released at every opportunity,” the letter said.

    “We ask you to make clear to the Chinese government that these cases are a priority for the U.S. Government. We also ask that you brief our offices within the next few weeks with an update on their cases, to include specifics about your engagement with the Chinese government to date, and your plan for future engagement.”

    The letter to Pompeo came after several top U.S. officials and a U.S. lawmaker called out China last week for its treatment of Uyghurs in the XUAR, slamming Beijing for what they said was a systematic effort to destroy the Muslim minority’s religious and cultural identity.

    U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, and Senator Marco Rubio spoke at separate events in Washington decrying China’s re-education camps in the XUAR and calling on the country to end its religious persecution of the Uyghurs, in a rare example of U.S. officials at such senior levels concertedly drawing attention to the issue.

    Earlier in July, Pompeo told Voice of America in an interview that China should refrain from using “the guise of a counter terrorism investigation to persecute religious freedom” and condemned Beijing’s draconian policies in the XUAR.

    Citing credible reports, Rubio and his CECC co-chair Representative Chris Smith, said recently that as many as 500,000 to a million people are or have been detained in the re-education camps, calling it ”the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today.”

    Adrian Zenz, a lecturer in social research methods at the Germany-based European School of Culture and Theology, said the number “could be closer to 1.1 million, which equates to 10-11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the region.”

    In March, several human rights and press freedom watchdog groups slammed China’s detention of the RFA Uyghur Service reporter’s relatives and called for their release.


    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018144350.html

  3. #78
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    The Hole at the Heart of China’s Silk Road

    A seething and repressed Xinjiang can’t become a hub for trade.

    By Mihir Sharma
    August 8, 2018, 5:00 AM GMT+7





    The western province has become a police state.

    Mihir Sharma is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist.

    Nobody pretends the People’s Republic of China is an entirely benign power, least of all its leaders in Beijing. Yet, even by the standards of what continues to be a remarkably repressive state, the stories that are emerging from behind the Great Firewall about the crackdown on Xinjiang’s Uighur Muslim population are deeply disturbing and deserve more of the world’s attention.

    The one country on earth which should best understand the danger and futility of such efforts has reportedly set up “reeducation centres” across the length and breadth of its largest province, where political prisoners are instructed to repeat mantras about the greatness of the Chinese state and of President Xi Jinping. They write self-criticisms late into the night. Observant Muslims are forced to drink alcohol.

    Persistent dissenters are allegedly subject to torture, including in a terrifying device known as a “tiger chair.” One recent academic study warnsthat anything between several hundred thousand and over a million residents of Xinjiang may have been sent to the camps. The Chinese government has repeatedly denied the existence of any reeducation camps, saying that the people of Xinjiang "live and work in peace and enjoy development and tranquillity.” It has also argued in the past that the “tiger chair” is “padded for comfort.”

    Now, you could be outraged by these stories and demand, as some countries have done, that Chinese leaders respect the human rights of all their citizens. But fewer and fewer governments want to take the risk of offending China. And, after all, more than half the people of Xinjiang are Muslims – and who today would really go out on a limb and speak out against the “reeducation” of faithful Muslims? So in Xinjiang, as in Tibet, the world is likely to give China a pass.

    But there’s another question that Chinese leaders, and the rest of us, should be asking. And that is: What does this repression mean for China’s ambitions in Central Asia and beyond?
    After all, Xinjiang may today be a distant border province. But it occupies a very different position on the map of the world as Xi would remake it. The Silk Roads of the past went through what is now Xinjiang and, if the Belt and Road Initiative ever takes off, it is Xinjiang that will be its hub and heart. The province is intended to connect Central Asia, the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and Siberia to the densely industrialized Chinese heartland.
    China’s crackdown is meant at least in part to pacify the region, which has seen fluctuating waves of resentment and separatist sentiment over the years. But can a province so tightly controlled by the authorities become the crossroads of a continent’s trade?

    Uighurs are now largely forbidden to travel abroad – and even those who leave the province for other parts of China are suspect. Visa requirements for visitors from places like Pakistan have been tightened. Fewer will visit; others have found that wives and children across the border have vanishedinto camps.
    Trade is more than a few sealed trucks rolling up to a checkpoint set amid walls and barbed wire. Trade cannot happen without people – without the coming and going of traders, without bustling border cities and entrepots where deals are made and demand is weighed.

    Perhaps China’s planners imagine that Xinjiang need be nothing but usefully located real estate, a barren land through which trains will thunder, shipping their products west. That is, however, unlikely to happen. For one, Xinjiang does not stand in isolation. Many of its people are part of a larger Central Asian cultural network. The case of an ethnically Kazakh Chinese woman who fled after working in one of the camps, for instance, has become a cause célèbre in Kazakhstan.

    The government in Astana is already having to deal with increasing popular anger about the Xinjiang crackdown and is quietly complaining to China. The louder the discontent at home, the less polite its complaints will be. Do Chinese leaders imagine that the Belt and Road can be laid down without the cooperation of Central Asia’s governments or of its people?

    Perhaps China imagines instead that continued mass settlement of the province by ethnically Han Chinese migrants from elsewhere in the country will solve the problem. The government has, after all, ensured that the province’s residency rules are the most liberal in China. But that will merely create a social tinderbox that no “smart” police state, such as is being piloted in Xinjiang’s cities, can truly control.

    It’s not yet too late for China to realize its errors and to seek reconciliation with Xinjiang’s Uighurs. If the land-based economic corridors of Xi’s imagination are to become a reality, then China will need to build a peaceful and secure Xinjiang that’s integrated effectively with its neighbors. A police state full of brutal reeducation camps will merely provoke a terrifying backlash – and the Belt and Road will be among the casualties.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  4. #79
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    The Chinese are really screwing them at both ends, aren't they ? These unfortunate people can't live as they are, and can't escape.

    ...."They interrogated him about his work with a tourist agency inviting Chinese to apply for Kazakh tourist visas, which they claimed was a way to help Chinese Muslims escape"....

    Communist behaviour is just awful.

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    But fewer and fewer governments want to take the risk of offending China. And
    People being afraid to confront the ones in power.....lotta that going around these days
    Last edited by uncle junior; 08-08-2018 at 09:04 AM.

  6. #81
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    They must be wimps. A lot of China's strategy is bluff and bluster....sabre-rattling....brinksmanship.

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    A lot of China's strategy is bluff and bluster....sabre-rattling....brinksmanship
    ...until the tanks appear in the town square and the protesters are hunted down and shot...

  8. #83
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    That's the thing about brinksmanship...kind of effective when you have a lengthy record of not giving a shit where the brink is.

  9. #84
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    They have never used brinksmanship with their own people. It's always been the heavy-handed use of power.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...until the tanks appear in the town square and the protesters are hunted down and shot...
    Nah, I don't thinks so.

    They've learnt from the British, Germans, Jews and ameristanis. Just fence them off, stop any food, water (except for torture purposes) or power and they gradually disappear. If they get too uppity bomb them from their super planes, safe from the natives catapult stones and far from prying "investigative", free, western eyes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    A lot of China's strategy is bluff and bluster....sabre-rattling....brinksmanship.
    Learning fast eh, from another alleged civilised world leader.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    These unfortunate people can't live as they are, and can't escape.
    Try getting through ameristani passport control without paying ones taxes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    Communist behaviour is just awful.
    The "free world's" however is wonderful eh? Better or worse, ask the new members of the "moderately prosperous societies" in Asia. Mostly run by dictators by all western accounts.

    Compare them with the citizens of Europe, Australasia and ameristan. Who have been the actual winners in the last 20 years?
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  11. #86
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Xinjiang Political ‘Re-Education Camps’ Treat Uyghurs ‘Infected by Religious Extremism’: CCP Youth League


    An official Chinese Communist Party recording recently obtained by RFA’s Uyghur Service characterizes Uyghurs who have been sent for political “re-education” as “infected by an ideological illness”—not unlike a disease that must be treated at a hospital. The 12-minute Uyghur language audio recording issued in October 2017 offers a rare glimpse into Beijing’s justification for its network of political “re-education camps” used since April 2017 to jail or detain Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR). The XUAR’s Party Youth League recording, entitled ‘What Kind of Place is the Educational Transformation Center,’ was published Oct. 11, 2017 on the WeChat social media network by Talap/Tagdim [Request/Offer] Salon and addressed to Uyghur youth as part of a bid to assuage concerns over the camps, which credible reports suggest have held upwards of 1.1 million people, or 10-11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the XUAR. Aside from a brief mention in a recent article carried by state media, China's central government authorities have not publicly acknowledged the existence of the camps, and the number of inmates kept in each facility remains a closely guarded secret. The following are excerpts from the recording:




    In recent times, amid a growing heavy crackdown, a small number of people—particularly young people—have gone to re-education camps to study. However, their parents, friends and relatives, and the general public don’t understand the benefits of re-education, and as a result they are worried and fearful. So let us give answers to their questions and their concerns today.

    Members of the public who have been chosen for re-education have been infected by an ideological illness. They have been infected with religious extremism and violent terrorist ideology, and therefore they must seek treatment from a hospital as an inpatient. In recent years, there have been violent incidents occurring in Xinjiang, one after another, instigated by the “three evil forces [of “terrorism,” “religious extremism,” and “separatism”], which has threatened the safety of people from all ethnic communities and caused serious damage and losses. These terrorists have one thing in common: they were infected by religious extremism and a violent terrorism disease.

    The religious extremist ideology is a type of poisonous medicine which confuses the mind of the people. Once they are poisoned by it, some turn into extremists who no longer value even their own lives … If we do not eradicate religious extremism at its roots, the violent terrorist incidents will grow and spread all over like an incurable malignant tumor.

    Although a certain number of people who have been indoctrinated with extremist ideology have not committed any crimes, they are already infected by the disease. There is always a risk that the illness will manifest itself at any moment, which would cause serious harm to the public. That is why they must be admitted to a re-education hospital in time to treat and cleanse the virus from their brain and restore their normal mind. We must be clear that going into a re-education hospital for treatment is not a way of forcibly arresting people and locking them up for punishment, it is an act that is part of a comprehensive rescue mission to save them.

    In order to provide treatment to people who are infected with ideological illnesses and to ensure the effectiveness of the treatment, the Autonomous Regional Party Committee decided to set up re-education camps in all regions, organizing special staff to teach state and provincial laws, regulations, the party’s ethnic and religious policies, and various other guidelines. They mobilized the public to learn the common language [Mandarin Chinese], complete various technical training courses, and take part in cultural and sport activities, teaching them what is correct and incorrect … so they can clearly distinguish right from wrong … At the end of re-education, the infected members of the public return to a healthy ideological state of mind, which guarantees them the ability to live a beautiful happy life with their families.

    ‘Same as physical illnesses’

    Ideological illnesses are the same as physical illnesses, in that they must be treated in time, and should never be ignored and allowed to become serious. Otherwise, later we will regret it, as it will be too late … Being infected by religious extremism and violent terrorist ideology and not seeking treatment is like being infected by a disease that has not been treated in time, or like taking toxic drugs … There is no guarantee that it will not trigger and affect you in the future. If people don’t attend re-education class because there is no one to take responsibility for the household chores, or if they choose to run away from re-education, that can be considered being very irresponsible to themselves, their families and society.

    Families of those who have been taken for re-education may have concerns over whether they will be charged for re-education classes, provided with food, or if they will be uncomfortable during periods of cold weather, or punished. All these worries are unnecessary … If the trainees fail to achieve the desired results, they will continue classes free of charge until they are qualified and fit to leave … Citizens, please remain calm and relax, no one in the re-education camps will starve, be left in the cold, be punished, or be forced to work. On the contrary, they are given a rare, free chance of re-education in order to reform themselves.

    Some people worry that once they have been through the re-education process, they will be classified as bad people, and that even after having worked hard to complete the re-education program they will be discriminated against and treated differently. In fact, this is an unnecessary concern. Just like people who have had an operation, and have taken medication before recovering from their illnesses, the public won’t see them as someone who is ill.

    However, we must be cautious about one fact: having gone through re-education and recovered from the ideological disease doesn’t mean that one is permanently cured. We can only say that they are physically healthy, and there is no sign that the disease may return. After recovering from an illness, if one doesn’t exercise to strengthen the body and the immune system against disease, it could return worse than before. So, after completing the re-education process in the hospital and returning home … they must remain vigilant, empower themselves with the correct knowledge, strengthen their ideological studies, and actively attend various public activities to bolster their immune system against the influence of religious extremism and violent terrorism, and safeguard themselves from being infected once again, to prevent later regrets.

    This has been an explanation of re-education and should alleviate the public’s anxiety. We hope that every youth thoroughly understands the harm of religious extremism and violent terrorism, strengthens their mental immune system against the virus, and returns to the great family of the Chinese nation to lead a healthy and happy life.

    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyghur/infected-08082018173807.html

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Citizens, please remain calm and relax, no one in the re-education camps will starve, be left in the cold, be punished, or be forced to work. On the contrary, they are given a rare, free chance of re-education in order to reform themselves.
    The whole article is the most extreme example of mendacious, fictiionalised nonsense created by the Mainland Chinese that I have ever seen.....it is just stunning in its blatant lies.

    But the part I quoted really takes the cake. Unbelievable !

  13. #88
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    Bit like Thailand then. "Reeducation" is the Asian way, and of course only for the good of the citizens.

  14. #89
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Tens of Thousands of Xinjiang’s Kuchar County Residents Held in Political ‘Re-Education Camps’

    More than 45,000 residents of a mostly Uyghur-populated county in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) are being held in three main political “re-education camps,” according to a local official, who said the facilities are guarded by armed personnel.

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in political re-education camps throughout the XUAR, where members of the ethnic group have long complained of pervasive discrimination, religious repression, and cultural suppression under Chinese rule.

    A staffer at the Kuchar (in Chinese, Kuche) county police department in the XUAR’s Aksu (Akesu) prefecture recently told RFA’s Uyghur Service that three camps housing most of the county’s detainees are located in the Yengisher district of the county seat—about 10 kilometers (six miles) from Kuchar city center.

    “I believe it is more than 45,000 … [or] slightly less than 10 percent [of the population],” the staffer said, speaking on condition of anonymity, when asked how many residents of Kuchar county are currently held in the camps.

    No.3 Re-Education Camp—the largest of the three—holds detainees accused of “minor offenses,” he said, adding that the facility is mostly used to teach inmates Mandarin Chinese.

    “[The camp holds] more than 10,000 [detainees], though it could be 15,000,” he said.

    “The most serious offenders are sent to the No. 1 and No. 2 re-education camps … I have heard they also built a fourth camp, but no one has been sent there yet.”

    The staffer told RFA that camp No. 1 holds “about 5,000 or 6,000” people who have been accused of listening to unsanctioned religious teachings, made the holy Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca or studied abroad in countries blacklisted by China’s government because of the threat of religious extremism.

    Camp No. 2 holds “between 5,000 and 10,000” detainees, he said, without providing details about the alleged “offenses” committed by people interned at the facility.

    The staffer was unable to provide an estimate of the number of people who are forced to attend “open re-education camps,” where students are permitted to return to their homes at night after daily indoctrination classes.

    He said all four camps were accessible from downtown Kuchar via Hu Yang Road, through the village of Zhong Da Gou, and were well fortified.

    “[No. 2 Re-Education Camp] was a prison and was expanded before being turned into a re-education camp—both No.1 and No. 2 were prisons originally,” the staffer said, while No. 3 camp had been “newly built.”

    “They built the walls higher … more than three meters (10 feet),” he said of the camps.

    “You can only see the second or third floors, and nothing below that, but there are armed guards on top of the buildings, inside the gates, and outside the gates.”

    A staffer at Haniqatam township’s No. 7 village police station, in Kuchar county, recently told RFA that as many as 6,000 residents of the township have been held in re-education camps for as long as two years.

    Camp network

    An editorial in China’s official Global Times newspaper recently dismissed international coverage of the re-education camps in the XUAR, which it labeled “training institutes,” saying western media outlets were incorrectly referring to them as “detention” sites and “baselessly criticizing China’s human rights.”

    Aside from the brief mention in the article, China's central government authorities have not publicly acknowledged the existence of political re-education camps in the XUAR, and the number of inmates kept in each facility remains a closely guarded secret. But local officials in many parts of the region have in RFA telephone interviews forthrightly described sending significant numbers of Uyghurs to the camps and even described overcrowding in some facilities.

    Citing credible reports, U.S. lawmakers Marco Rubio and Chris Smith, who head the bipartisan Congressional-Executive Commission on China, said recently that as many as 500,000 to a million people are or have been detained in the re-education camps, calling it ”the largest mass incarceration of a minority population in the world today.”

    Adrian Zenz, a lecturer in social research methods at the Germany-based European School of Culture and Theology, said the number “could be closer to 1.1 million, which equates to 10-11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the region.”

    Last week, China Human Rights Defenders (CHRD) and a partner NGO, Equal Rights Initiative, said they had found through interviews with people in the region that up to 3 million residents of the XUAR, especially ethnic Uyghurs, may have been detained in the political re-education camps or forced to attend “education sessions” for “de-radicalization” as of June this year.


    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018124248.html

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  16. #91
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    You were never in N. Ireland at the time of the troubles then?

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    You were never in N. Ireland at the time of the troubles then?
    Becuz if the answer yes, this PRC ~Uighur situation becomes acceptable....

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    Quote Originally Posted by uncle junior View Post
    situation
    Which one?

    Using the BBC video as examples:

    If you mean being "forced" to walk through a metal detector in the street, where terrorists have used bombs on civilians, not understanding what foreigners are saying or not wanting to be videoed. I'm all for it.

    However you may mean something else, please clarify.


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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Which one?
    How many PRC-Uighur situations does this thread cover?

    I was referring to the one you were referring to in your post about not having been to N Ireland

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    [QUOTE=uncle junior;3808827]does this thread cover?[/QUOT]

    The majority of posts in this thread are Mk's cut and pastes from ameristani funded and directed propaganda sites.

    So what of all the situations, which you suggest are "covered" in this thread, are you concerned about and why?

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    [QUOTE=OhOh;3808974]
    Quote Originally Posted by uncle junior View Post
    does this thread cover?[/QUOT]

    The majority of posts in this thread are Mk's cut and pastes from ameristani funded and directed propaganda sites.

    So what of all the situations, which you suggest are "covered" in this thread, are you concerned about and why?
    carry on......

  22. #97
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    Despite Overwhelming Proof China Denies UN’s Claims that Over a Million People Held in Internment Camps

    BEIJING – China rejected on Monday allegations raised by a U.N. panel that over a million Uighurs may be held in internment camps in the restive Xinjiang region, but said that some people “underwent re-education” after being deceived by extremists.


    Hu Lianhe, deputy director general of the United Front Work Department of the CPC Central Committee, said that authorities in the far western Xinjiang region protected the full rights of all citizens equally.


    China says that Xinjiang faces a serious threat from Islamist militants and separatists who plot attacks and stir up tensions between the mostly Muslim Uighur minority who call the region home and the ethnic Han Chinese majority.


    “The argument that over a million people are detained in re-education centers is completely untrue,” Hu told the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on the second day of its regular review of China’s record.


    “On freedom of religious belief, Xinjiang guarantees citizens freedom of religious belief and protects normal religious activities,” he said.


    “Those deceived by religious extremism … shall be assisted by resettlement and re-education,” he added.




    Gay McDougall, a panel member, said on Friday it had received many credible reports that 1 million ethnic Uighurs in China are held in what resembles a “massive internment camp that is shrouded in secrecy, a sort of no rights zone”.


    “To say that they don’t violate rights of minorities does not prove anything. We have to more than a denial of allegations,” she told the Chinese delegation on Monday.


    “I notice that you didn’t quite deny that these re-education or indoctrination programs don’t take place,” she added, seeking clarification on how many people undergo re-education.


    Hu said China has clamped down on “extremist and terrorist crimes” in Xinjiang in accordance with the law, saying that there had been assassinations, explosions and poisonings there.


    But, he said, it did not target any particular ethnic minority or seek ‘de-Islamisation” of the region.


    Earlier on Monday, in the country’s first response to the U.N. criticism, a state-run newspaper said that massively stepped-up security in Xinjiang has helped prevent “great tragedy”.




    Meanwhile, The Chinese authorities have been limiting access of human rights groups to the country. Police from Cambodia to France have capitulated to pressure from Chinese law enforcement or Party “discipline” officers and handed over allegedly corrupt fugitives without any semblance of due process.


    Universities struggle with ferocious complaints from Chinese diplomats about whether the institutions may describe Taiwan as an independent country, or have the Dalai Lama as a commencement speaker.


    The question for democracies or businesses isn’t whether to engage: it is how to engage in a principled manner. This means treating China like many governments treat US President Donald Trump when he makes outrageous statements or adopts retrograde policies. Democratic leaders condemn Trump’s remarks about “fake news” – but don’t condemn China for its censorship or propaganda.


    They criticize Trump for his hostility towards the UN, but have nothing to say on China’s efforts to weaken the institution.
    It is time for new standards to reverse these highly abnormal relationships with China. Forty years into China’s “reform era”, Beijing has made clear it’s not moving on democracy, a free press, or an independent legal system, though courageous people continue to push for these at considerable personal risk.


    If powerful outside voices mindlessly engage, they not only stab these brave people in the back – they may also find themselves obliged to dance to the tune of a highly repressive government.


    By Stephanie Nebehay, Sophie Richardson
    Reuters, Aljazeera



    https://www.chiangraitimes.com/despi...ent-camps.html

  23. #98
    Thailand Expat
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    Your "detention/re-education centre" looks like many factory sites all over Asia. Factory units, medical centre, school, accommodation blocks, offices and recreation/parking areas.

    I wonder how many "human rights groups" get to interview the detainees here:






    Attached Images Attached Images

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    I do wonder about the exact details of how they re-educate Uyghurs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    I do wonder about the exact details of how they re-educate Uyghurs.
    All of them or just a very small proportion? If it is, as published, millions it will take years.

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