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  1. #226
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Xinjiang Authorities Sentence Uyghur Philanthropist to Death For Unsanctioned Hajj


    Abdughapar Abdurusul in an undated photo. Photo courtesy of Abdusattar Abdurusul








    Authorities in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) have sentenced a prominent Uyghur businessman and philanthropist to death for taking an unsanctioned Muslim holy pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia, according to his brother.

    Abdughapar Abdurusul, of Bakyol district in Ili Kazakh (in Chinese, Yili Hasake) Autonomous Prefecture’s Ghulja (Yining) city, “was arrested in July or August,” his brother Abdusattar Abdurusul recently told RFA’s Uyghur Service, citing Abdughapar’s Kazakh business partners living in Kazakhstan’s Almaty city.

    “The latest I heard is that my brother has been given a death sentence and he is waiting for his execution to be carried out … The reason is that he went to perform hajj on his own [instead of joining a state-sanctioned tour group],” he added, referring to the annual Muslim holy pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia.

    According to Abdusattar Abdurusul, his brother was provided with “no lawyer” during a “group trial,” suggesting he had been illegally sentenced to death. All death sentences should be reviewed by China’s Supreme Court in Beijing, but it is unclear whether Abdughapar Abdurusul's case has been examined.

    Abdughapar Abdurusul, a 42-year-old father of four, owns several shops and businesses, and multiple properties, his brother said, and had used some of the money he earned to build a mosque for the local community in recent years.

    Abdughapar Abdurusul had also sold an old family home for around 1 million yuan (U.S. $144,000) in April or May, and was living comfortably before he was arrested and all of his family’s assets—totaling around 100 million yuan (U.S. $14.4 million)—were seized, he said.

    “He is a philanthropist who enjoyed helping society … [but] now the government has taken away everything and destroyed his family’s lives completely,” Abdusattar Abdurusul said.

    Abdughapar Abdurusul’s eldest son Awzer was detained in 2017 after returning home from studying in Turkey, and his wife Merhaba Hajim was taken into custody in April this year, he added.

    Abdusattar Abdurusul said his sister Sayipjamal has been missing for “a long time” and is thought to also have been detained, while several of Abdughapar Abdurusul’s friends “have been sentenced to more than 18 years in prison.”


    Death in custody

    Staff members at the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture’s Public Security Bureau and local police stations in Ghulja city refused to answer questions or hung up the phone when contacted by RFA about Abdughapar Abdurusul’s case.

    But a long-time associate who worked with Abdughapar Abdurusul in Ili Kazakh’s Qorghas (Huocheng) county and is now living in exile told RFA he had also heard of the businessman’s sentence from local sources, and that his wife had died in custody.

    “A friend of mine called me, saying that our mutual friend Abdughapar Hajim had been sentenced to death,” the associate said, speaking on condition of anonymity and using an honorific title to denote that Abdughapar Abdurusul had completed a pilgrimage to Mecca.

    “[I also heard] that his wife had already died in prison,” he added.

    The associate said that “more than 50” people in Abdughapar Abdurusul’s circle of friends—including several police officers—had been arrested and imprisoned before him, but that he was the only to have been sentenced to death.

    When asked why Abdughapar Abdurusul might have been given such a harsh sentence, the associate said he was unsure, “but the Chinese government is killing Uyghurs for no particular reason.”

    A former close neighbor of Abdughapar Abdurusul’s named Turghunay, who is now living in exile in Turkey, also told RFA she had heard of his sentence and that Merhaba Hajim had died in detention.

    “I heard that Abdughapar Hajim was arrested in May or June and, prior to that, his eldest son Awzer had been arrested, followed by his wife, Merhaba Hajim,” she said.

    “I don’t know if he was arrested because of his wealth or having gone on hajj, but when I heard the news about his death sentence … I was devastated.”

    Turghunay said that Merhaba Hajim had “died in a [political] re-education camp,” where authorities have detained Uyghurs accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas throughout the XUAR since April 2017.

    “The death certificate was given to the family by the authorities,” she said, adding that “no one knows what has happened to their young children.”


    Camp network

    While Beijing initially denied the existence of re-education camps, the Uyghur chairman of Xinjiang’s provincial government, Shohrat Zakir, told China’s official Xinhua news agency last month that the facilities are an effective tool to protect the country from terrorism and provide vocational training for Uyghurs.

    Reporting by RFA’s Uyghur Service and other media organizations, however, has shown that those in the camps are detained against their will and subjected to political indoctrination, routinely face rough treatment at the hands of their overseers, and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities.

    Adrian Zenz, a lecturer in social research methods at the Germany-based European School of Culture and Theology, has said that some 1.1 million people are or have been detained in the camps—equating to 10 to 11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the XUAR.

    U.S. State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert recently said the U.S. government was “deeply troubled” by the crackdown on Uyghurs, while U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley described it last month as “the largest internment of civilians in the world today” and “straight out of George Orwell,” during a speech at the Chiefs of Defense Conference Dinner in Washington.




    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018131511.html

  2. #227
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    Such a factually complete post. -10/10

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    according to his brother.
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    his brother Abdusattar Abdurusul recently told RFA’s
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    The latest I heard is that
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    is unclear whether Abdughapar Abdurusul's case has been examined.
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    local police stations in Ghulja city refused to answer questions or hung up the phone when contacted by RFA
    Somebody with some intelligence at last.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    But a long-time associate who worked with Abdughapar Abdurusul in Ili Kazakh’s Qorghas (Huocheng) county and is now living in exile told RFA he had also heard of
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    A friend of mine called me
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    [I also heard] that his
    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    might have been given such a harsh sentence, the associate said he was unsure, “but the Chinese government is killing Uyghurs for no particular reason.”

  3. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Such a factually complete post. -10/10
    Of course your beloved chinkies are sure to reveal the truth aren't they?

    Snivelling sycophant.

  4. #229
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    China is creating concentration camps in Xinjiang. Here’s how we hold it accountable.


    Uighur security personnel patrol near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar in western China's Xinjiang region. (Ng Han Guan/AP)
    By Editorial Board November 24 (WaPo)

    CHINA CONTINUES to see the uproar over its creation of concentration camps holding as many as 1 million ethnic Uighurs and others as a public-relations problem. In recent days, the government issued another white paperclaiming it is protecting religious freedom and culture in the autonomous northwestern province of Xinjiang, despite evidence that it has corralled much of the Muslim population into spartan camps for forced brainwashing. When Western nations repeatedly brought up the camps on Nov. 6 at China’s five-year United Nations human rights review in Geneva, a top Chinese official dismissed the claims as “seriously far from the truth.”

    That is why recently introduced bipartisan legislation in Congress is vitally important. China’s leaders have dissembled for a year and cannot be allowed to escape accountability for the massive indoctrination and internment drive. Exposure of the camps — by witnesses, scholars, nongovernmental organizations and Western governments — has been extremely important. But China’s leaders are not shamed. They are old hands at repression, having built the system known as laojiao, or reeducation through labor, that existed outside the regular prison system and was widely used for punishing dissidents and petty criminals until it was closed down in 2013. Now it has been resurrected for use against the ethnic Uighurs, big time.

    The Uighur Human Rights Policy Act of 2018 — introduced with bipartisan sponsors, including Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.); Sen. Robert Menendez (N.J.), the ranking Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee; and Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.) in the House — calls for creating a U.S. special coordinator for Xinjiang to respond to the crisis, as well as paving the way for applying Global Magnitsky Act sanctions on specific Chinese officials responsible for the human rights violations. That includes Chen Quanguo, the party secretary overseeing the imprisonment.

    The legislation, if enacted, would mandate a report to Congress identifying Chinese firms contributing to the camps and ubiquitous surveillance systems in Xinjiang, perhaps leading to the sanctioning of these companies, and would empower the FBI to track down Chinese officials responsible for harassing Uighurs in the United States. When Uighurs outside China have protested what is happening, their relatives in Xinjiang have been hauled off to camps and other locations, as happened to relatives of six U.S.-based journalists for Radio Free Asia.

    Congress needs to act to fill a vacuum left by the Trump administration, which has said and done little about the Xinjiang repression. In Beijing, in an initiative led by Canada, 15 Western ambassadors have sought a meeting with Mr. Chen to express concern, but the United States did not join. It should. Most of the world’s majority-Muslim nations have been unconscionably muteabout the repression; the United States should stand with other liberal democracies.

    China has justified its actions as counterterrorism and “preventing extremism,” but it hardly makes sense to imprison 11.5 percent of the Muslim population of Xinjiang between the ages of 20 and 79, as has been estimated by some experts. Forcing tens of thousands of people into jails and then trying to wipe away their language and culture are crimes against an entire people. No amount of spin can conceal it.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  5. #230
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Exclusive: China will retaliate 'in proportion' to any U.S. sanction over Muslim Uighurs – ambassador

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - China will retaliate “in proportion” if the United States sanctions its top official in the restive region of Xinjiang over alleged human rights abuses, China’s ambassador to the United States said on Tuesday, adding that Beijing’s policies in the region are to “re-educate” terrorists.


    Chinese Ambassador to Washington Cui Tiankai told Reuters in an interview that China’s efforts to combat international terrorism are held to a double standard, comparing Chinese actions in Xinjiang to U.S. troops battling Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.


    “Can you imagine (if) some American officials in charge of the fight against ISIS would be sanctioned?” Cui said, adding “if such actions are taken, we have to retaliate.”


    Cui did not elaborate on specific actions China might take.


    Beijing has faced an outcry from activists, academics, foreign governments and U.N. rights experts over mass detentions and strict surveillance of the mostly Muslim Uighur minority and other Muslim groups in Xinjiang.


    In August, a United Nations human rights panel said it had received many credible reports that a million or more Uighurs in China are being held in what resembles a “massive internment camp that is shrouded in secrecy”.

    U.S. officials have said the Trump administration is considering sanctions targeting companies and officials linked to China’s crackdown on minority Muslims, including Xinjiang Party Secretary Chen Quanguo, who, as a member of the powerful politburo, is in the upper echelons of China’s leadership.




    Cui said that while the United States was using missiles and drones to kill terrorists, “we are trying to re-educate most of them, trying to turn them into normal persons (who) can go back to normal life,” Cui said.


    “We’ll see what will happen. We will do everything in proportion,” he said, responding to a question on how China would retaliate to possible U.S. sanctions on Chen.


    Cui’s comments are the strongest response yet to U.S. threats on the issue.


    Any such U.S. sanctions decision against so senior an official as Chen would be a rare move on human rights grounds by the Trump administration, which is engaged in a trade war with China while also seeking Beijing’s help to resolve a standoff over North Korea’s nuclear weapons.


    U.S. sanctions could be imposed under the Global Magnitsky Act, a federal law that allows the U.S. government to target human rights violators around the world with freezes on any U.S. assets, U.S. travel bans, and prohibitions on Americans doing business with them, U.S. officials have said.

    Chinese authorities routinely deny any ethnic or religious repression in Xinjiang. They say strict security measures – likened by critics to near martial law conditions, with police checkpoints, the detention centers, and mass DNA collection – are needed to combat the influence of extremist groups.





    After initial blanket denials of the detention facilities, officials have said that some citizens guilty of “minor offences” were sent to vocational centers to improve employment opportunities.


    At a briefing in Washington on Monday, a Uighur woman, Mihrigul Tursun, 29, told reporters she had experienced physical and psychological torture, including electrocution while strapped to a chair, during 10 months in Xinjiang detention centers.


    Tursun, who wept and shook as a translator read her prepared statement, said her three children were taken from her while she was in detention and that her four-month-old son had died without explanation in government custody.


    Rejecting Chinese government claims that the detention facilities serve vocational purposes, she said many of the dozens of other women in her cell were “well-educated professionals, such as teachers and doctors.”


    Tursun said she witnessed nine women die during one three-month period she spent in detention, including from sickness after being denied medical treatment.


    Reuters could not independently verify her account, though numerous former detainees have begun to share similar first-hand details with media. China’s embassy in Washington did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Tursun’s statement.


    Independent assessments of the conditions in Xinjiang are nearly impossible given restrictions on journalists from openly reporting from the region.


    U.N. human rights chief Michelle Bachelet has called on China to allow monitors in Xinjiang, though Beijing has responded by telling her to respect China’s sovereignty.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-u...-idUSKCN1NW2PA

  6. #231
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    Looks like the chinkies are doing everything they can to try and stop the truth leaking out.

    An award-winning Chinese photographer has disappeared while visiting China's Xinjiang region, says his wife.


    Lu Guang, who lives in New York, was invited to Xinjiang for a talk in October. His wife Xu Xiaoli says she last heard from him on 3 November.

    Officials later told her that national security officers in the heavily-controlled region had taken Mr Lu away.


    Ms Xu told the BBC that she did not know whether Mr Lu had done anything to provoke government anger.


    Mr Lu is a three-time World Press Photo award winner
    who focuses on environmental and societal issues in China.


    On 23 October, Mr Lu flew to Urumqi - the capital city of the Xinjiang region - where he had been invited to attend a number of photography events.


    He planned to fly to Sichuan where he would meet another friend, identified only as Mr Chen, on 5 November for a charity event.


    But when Mr Chen arrived in Sichuan, he was unable to find Mr Lu and contacted Ms Xu to ask about his whereabouts.


    She had no idea where he was as she hadn't heard from him since 3 November. Ms Xu contacted the wife of the person who had invited her husband to Xinjiang and was told both Mr Lu and the host had been taken away by national security.


    That was later confirmed by local officers from Zhejiang province, Mr Lu's hometown.


    They said they were unable to provide any more information.


    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-46356119

  7. #232
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    OhOh's Avatar
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    He's been around for 15years, why now?

  8. #233
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    He's been around for 15years, why now?
    Oh FFS, that's extraordinarily dim even for you.

    Look at the thread title.

  9. #234
    Valve Master
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    This is from May this year....I haven't noticed it announced on this thread previously, but it's worth repeating :


    More than a million Chinese Communist officials are being dispatched to live with local families in the Western region of Xinjiang, a move seen as a sign of the government's increasingly tightened grip over the area's predominantly Uyghur Muslim population.

    https://edition.cnn.com/2018/05/14/a...ntl/index.html

    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018153305.html

  10. #235
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    China is Surveilling and Threatening Uighurs in the U.S.



  11. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncle junior View Post
    China is Surveilling and Threatening Uighurs in the U.S.
    As your "reporter"uses the unproven 1,000,000 figure in his first sentence I stopped there.

  12. #237
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    As your "reporter"uses the unproven 1,000,000 figure in his first sentence I stopped there.
    He also uses 'alleged' before using the 1,000,000 figure......wasn't really about the 1 million anyway.

  13. #238
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    harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    It's OK the chinkies are just teaching them how to play the recorder and crochet.

    All harmless fun.


  14. #239
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Xinjiang Authorities ‘Preparing’ Re-education Camps Ahead of Expected International Monitors

    Authorities in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) are making “preparations” in advance of international monitors who might start investigating reports of mass incarcerations of ethnic Uyghurs by improving the appearance of political re-education camps and warning residents against speaking out about the facilities, according to sources.

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslim minorities accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in re-education camps throughout the XUAR, and some 1.1 million people are believed to have been held in the network—equating to 10 to 11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the region.

    The mass detentions have drawn significant attention from the international community, and particularly from the U.S., where lawmakers have called for access to the camps and proposed sanctions against officials and entities in China deemed responsible for abusing the rights of ethnic Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities in the XUAR.

    While Beijing initially denied the existence of re-education camps, the chairman of the XUAR government, Shohrat Zakir, told China’s official Xinhua news agency in October that the facilities are an effective tool to protect the country from terrorism and provide vocational training for Uyghurs.

    But reporting by RFA’s Uyghur Service and other media organizations has shown that those held in the camps are detained against their will, are subjected to political indoctrination and rough treatment at the hands of their overseers, and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities. The atmosphere is more like a prison than any kind of school, multiple sources say.

    A source recently told RFA that residents of Awat (in Chinese, Awati) county, in the XUAR’s Aksu (Akesu) prefecture, had been informed that an “inspection team” would soon be visiting the area, which is home to three re-education camps.

    Of the 5,700 detainees at No. 2 Re-education Camp, 2,700 had been transferred to No. 1 and No. 3 camps, the source said, speaking to RFA on condition of anonymity, and authorities are removing all barbed wire from the perimeter of the camp walls, as well as other security measures, such as metal bars on the doors and windows.

    If anyone is asked by the inspection team how many camps exist in Awat, residents should say only one, the source added.

    The source provided RFA with a copy of a "confidentiality agreement" authorities in Awat are requiring re-education camp detainees to sign, which states that they will not discuss the workings of the camps, accept any interviews, or use communication channels such as social media or SMS messaging to disseminate information about the camp system.

    Those who violate the agreement are subject to "accountability according to related national laws," it reads.

    Officers at police stations in Awat were unable to confirm the preparations and referred additional questions to their superiors.

    However, officers at police stations in Kashgar (Kashi) prefecture’s Kargilik (Yecheng) county recently told RFA that an inspection team is believed to be arriving there within weeks, and said preparations were underway for its arrival.

    When asked about the team, an officer from the Janggilieski Township Police Station told RFA that “we have done all of the preparation work,” and referred further questions to his superiors.

    An officer at the Tazghun Township Police Station said “work at the local level has increased dramatically due to the forthcoming inspection,” and that he and others had been “attending to the preparation tasks.”

    He referred additional questions to a team that includes public security officers, the local Communist Party secretary, and assistant police officers, which is preparing for the inspection, adding that “I can’t afford to say anything wrong.”

    However, the officer confirmed that authorities had been coaching residents to refrain from saying negative things about the local government or mentioning the re-education camps, and that they had been removing barbed wire and CCTV cameras from the camps.



    A copy of the 'confidentiality agreement' authorities in Awat county are requiring re-education camp detainees to sign. Credit: RFA listener




    Ghulja preparations

    A businessman from Ghulja (Yining) city, in Ili Kazakh (Yili Hasake) Autonomous Prefecture, who is trading in neighboring Kazakhstan, recently told RFA of a similar situation in his hometown.

    “I have heard that officials are visiting households door to door, informing people that there is an inspection team coming soon,” he said.

    “People are taught what to say, and they were warned not to mention the difficulties they are facing.”

    According to the businessman, who also declined to provide his name, residents were told to “praise the [Communist] Party’s policies” and to “say only good things about the government.”

    They were also warned that there “may be foreigners among them,” so they should refrain from mentioning anything about re-education camps.

    “If you are asked about them, you must say that after attending the program they will become good people,” the businessman said.

    Authorities threatened residents that any negative comments could lead to imprisonment or detention in the re-education camps, he added, while those who complain about the situation in the region will have “three generations of their family blacklisted,” and the government “will not leave them alone.”

    The businessman said that his colleagues who had been to Ghulja in recent weeks had seen national flags, which are hung every 50-100 meters (165-330 feet) along streets in the city, replaced with “decorative reproductions of Uyghur musical instruments.”

    “I also heard that people are being trained to sing and dance, and were repeatedly told that they must look happy and enthusiastic when visited by the inspection team,” he said.

    “Authorities tell them, ‘to show your contentment with life, you must dance happily, and everyone must smile joyfully. No one may look sad, otherwise there will be consequences.’”

    Meanwhile, the businessman said, police vans can regularly be seen driving about on area roads, and are believed to be transporting detainees from one camp to another.

    “The scene gives people the impression that [the authorities] are preparing for a very important event,” he said.

    “There used to be barbed wire on the walls of all the camps, but now it has all been removed. No one knows what is happening inside the walled compounds, or why the police vans are so busy.”


    Call for access

    Dolkun Isa, president of the Munich-based World Uyghur Congress (WUC) exile group, and other Uyghur exile leaders have long said Zakir’s claims that Uyghurs are benefiting from free job training centers in the XUAR are “aimed at deceiving the international community” and suggested that if he is telling the truth, Beijing should grant the U.N. and Western governments unfettered access to the region to investigate the camp network.

    Washington-based lawyer and Uyghur activist Nury Turkel recently said that international pressure has forced China to “deny its brutal treatment and criminalization of the Uyghur people based on their race, religion, culture and traditions,” and create a narrative to suggest that Beijing “is doing a favor for the Uyghurs.”

    He has urged the international community “to be extremely cautious of China’s calculated propaganda campaigns to mislead the world while continuing its onslaught on the Uyghur people.”

    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018152245.html

  15. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    and some 1.1 million people are believed to have been held in the network
    hoho just quit reading.....

  16. #241
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    I imagine many organisations "clean up" if forewarned of an inspection. SOP. But MK appears to think it newsworthy.


    Hi ho, it's off to work she goes.

  17. #242
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I imagine
    ...your imagination is a many-splendored pit of silliness...

  18. #243
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    Imagistan

  19. #244
    fat cnut SKkin's Avatar
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    I suppose Engdahl is just as silly...

    "Beijing and the Turkic Uyghur Threat - A “Holy War” Against China"

    excerpts from my post here:
    http://teakdoor.com/speakers-corner/...ml#post3864946 ("Freedom Is Slavery")

    In this issue of my periodic newsletter I want to go into the deep background to
    a little-known role of US intelligence, the CIA to be more precise, in infiltrating
    China’s Uyghur Muslim population over a period of decades. Recent Western
    mainstream media and US Congress members have made allegations that
    Beijing has created internment camps in China’s western Xinjiang Province
    where an estimated 11 million Muslim Uyghurs live. While Beijing vehemently
    denies interring one million Uyghurs, the charges are serving to increasingly
    demonize China as an “enemy regime,” along with Russia, in Western media.

    The recent chorus of attacks on Beijing over treatment of its Muslim minority in
    Xinjiang conveniently ignores the relevant background to why Beijing is very
    alarmed about its Muslim Uyghurs. One major reason is that there are an
    estimated 5-18,000 Uyghurs fighting as Islamic Jihadists in Syria, and reportedly
    being groomed to return to China to wage Jihad against the government in the
    region which is the heart of China’s oil and gas pipeline networks and a hub for
    the New Silk Road. The role of Turkey and the Erdogan government in
    supporting what he calls “East Turkestan peoples” is at best unclear, at worst,
    malicious. At this juncture, what is clear is that China’s Uyghur problem has its
    roots in the decades of Saudi Wahhabite oil money financing CIA projects across
    Asia on behalf of the Muslim Brotherhood and their terrorist spinoff groups
    including Al Qaeda, Al Nusra Front in Syria and ISIS.
    CIA and Xinjiang’s Uyghur Islamist Unrest

    One of the major architects of Brzezinski’s Islamic Arc of Crisis strategy in 1979
    and after was a career senior CIA Middle East specialist, Graham E. Fuller, a
    specialist in “Islamic extremism,” also known as political Islamic Jihadism. In 1999,
    Fuller wrote a policy paper for the RAND Corporation, a Pentagon-linked think
    tank, in which he stated, “The policy of guiding the evolution of Islam and of
    helping them against our adversaries worked marvelously well in Afghanistan
    against the Russians. The same doctrines can still be used to destabilize what
    remains of Russian power, and especially to counter the Chinese influence in
    Central Asia [author’s emphasis—F.W.E.].”4

    Fuller’s proposal had become fundamental US secret strategic policy by the
    late 1990s. Washington’s policy of “weaponizing” and training radical Islamists
    and establishing thousands of radical Islamist schools and madrassas across the
    Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia, complete with CIA-translated radical school
    books and Koran interpretations that fanned hatred of “infidels” or non-Sunni
    Muslims, was to be directed at the emerging economic colossus of China and also
    against a then weaker Russian foe.

    With the chaos after the collapse of the Soviet Union in the beginning of the
    1990s, the CIA rushed into the newly independent Central Asian republics to
    immediately establish their presence, using as their proxy the veterans of the
    Afghan Mujahideen wars. They flew Mujahideen Jihadists into Azerbaijan to get
    control of the government for US and British oil companies.5 They brought
    Mujahideen into Chechnya and the former Soviet Caucasus to wreak terror and
    chaos there to block a Russian-Azeri oil pipeline and weaken a struggling Russia in
    the Yeltsin era.

    Less known, they also brought their Mujahideen Holy War veterans into
    Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, and even inside the borders of China’s largely Muslim
    Xinjiang Province. Graham Fuller’s proposal was being secretly implemented
    against China.
    In September 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping made a major tour of Central
    Asian countries to announce Chinese plans to build a New Silk Road across Central
    Asia.

    The plans included more natural gas for Chinese industry from
    Turkmenistan, requiring construction of a new branch line for the Central Asia-
    China gas pipeline, which will also include Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. Xi Jinping
    spoke of building an “economic belt along the Silk Road,” a trans-Eurasian project
    spanning from the Pacific Ocean to the Baltic Sea. It would, he said in a speech in
    Astana in Kazakhstan, create an economic belt inhabited by “close to 3 billion
    people and [would represent] the biggest market in the world with unparalleled
    potential.”26

    In his Turkmenistan visit on the same tour, Xi secured the transnational
    Turkmenistan-China gas pipeline that would go along the route from
    Turkmenistan to Uzbekistan–Tajikistan–Kyrgyzstan on to China. Beijing’s only
    problem was that the Central Asia-China gas pipeline and other pipelines, power
    lines, and transport networks all ran through the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous
    Region. Xinjiang was targeted by Washington in an ongoing destabilization
    campaign using Graham Fuller’s friends and their Islamic Jihadist terror bands as
    their proxies.

    As such strategic economic moves by China, potentially positive moves that
    could lift the largest part of the world’s population into a more prosperous
    economic life, went forward, certain powerful interest groups in the West—
    banking, industrial, military, and political—came to view Beijing, only a decade or
    so earlier the “great friend” of America, now as the new emerging Great Enemy.
    An Asia Pivot military shift was announced by President Obama to refocus US
    military activities on blocking that growing Chinese influence.

    A central part of their strategy to derail China and its growing Eurasian
    presence would be the increased deployment of Islamic fundamentalism of the
    Gülen, Al Qaeda, and Muslim Brotherhood kind against China, Russia, and all
    Eurasia, the one space that Zbigniew Brzezinski in his famous book The Grand
    Chessboard called the only possible challenge to America’s future hegemony and
    dominance.

    To understand how that had evolved to the situation of such a threat today
    it is important to go into the historical roots of political Islam and its emergence
    after the First World War and after.

  20. #245
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    I suppose Engdahl is just as silly...

    "Beijing and the Turkic Uyghur Threat - A “Holy War” Against China"

    excerpts from my post here:
    http://teakdoor.com/speakers-corner/...ml#post3864946 ("Freedom Is Slavery")
    Whoever wrote all that crap conveniently ignores (or is too stupid to understand) that China's real issue with what is a key part of Winnie's "Belt and Road" farce is that its inhabitants bow to Allah, not him. He's the sort of egotistical fucking prick that would take that personally.

  21. #246
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    The best thing that has happened to China, is Trumps sanctions. The USA is currently the ONLY country that has stood up to them. The problem with Trump, though is that he is so unpredictable.



    There is one thing for sure though...The very one thing that the Chin do not want, is a public back lash in the west. They know the power of people (They do it all the time) and how it will hurt them.

  22. #247
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Czech and Slovak Scholars, Public Figures Call on China to Close Political Re-education Camps in Xinjiang

    A group of 115 Czech and Slovak scholars and public figures have appealed to China’s government to shut down political re-education camps in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) and commit to the protection of human rights in the country.

    In a statement marking the 70th anniversary of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) on Monday, the 115 representatives of academia, public life, nongovernmental organizations, and think tanks expressed concerns over the repression of ethnic Uyghurs, Tibetans and other ethnic and religious minorities, as well as civil society the media and other social groups in China.

    The group said it was “particularly alarmed by the repression of Uyghurs, Kazakhs, and other Muslim minorities in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and condemn the imprisonment of hundreds of thousands of people in political reeducation camps.”

    Beginning in April 2017, Uyghurs and other Turkic Muslim minorities accused of harboring “strong religious views” and “politically incorrect” ideas have been jailed or detained in re-education camps throughout the XUAR, and some 1.1 million people are believed to have been held in the network—equating to 10 to 11 percent of the adult Muslim population of the region.

    On Monday, the group called on China to “immediately release all persons detained in the political reeducation camps, to end the repressive policy in Xinjiang, Tibet and other minority regions, and to uphold political, religious and cultural rights.”

    They also noted that Beijing is “using ever more assertive methods” to advance its claims in disputed border areas, including supporting non-democratic regimes and working to weaken the political systems and societies of democratic countries, adding that these tactics “compromise liberal values in international relations and pose a security threat to the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic.”

    They urged Czech and Slovak state authorities to join an international call for the observance of universal human rights in China, to end cooperation with state and non-state actors within and outside of China which are involved in the repression of Uyghurs and other Chinese people, to fast-track political asylum applications from Chinese nationals, and to strengthen support for human rights and democracy.

    ‘We cannot stay silent’

    Speaking to RFA’s Uyghur Service, Martin Slobodnik, a professor of Chinese and Tibetan Studies at Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia, said he and other signatories felt the need to “raise awareness about this ugly face of the Chinese regime” on the anniversary of the UDHR, which was enacted by the U.N. and established, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected.

    “We also call on the authorities in the Czech Republic and Slovakia to include the issue of human rights and especially the persecution of ethnic groups in Xinjiang into their bilateral agenda with China,” he said.

    “We cannot stay silent and just watch when hundreds of thousands of innocent people have to endure imprisonment and brainwashing just because they are Uyghurs or they are Muslims.”

    Slobodnik said that the growing global role of China in international politics and economy had left governments more reluctant to voice concerns about rights abuses in China, and suggested that it was the responsibility of scholars and civil society to do so.

    He highlighted Slovakia and the Czech Republic’s own history of Communist persecution between the years of 1948 and 1988, when they were united as the Soviet-aligned state of Czechoslovakia, which he said had created “a heightened sensitivity towards authoritarian control and Communism in general” amongst the population—especially among intellectuals and academics.


    Universal rights

    Ondrej Klimes, a researcher at the Czech Academy of Sciences’ Oriental Institute, who spearheaded Monday’s statement, told RFA that it was time for scholars and academics throughout the world to inform the public and state institutions about the issue of human rights violations in China.

    “It’s good for the Chinese authorities to know that the number of people throughout the world who are concerned about the situation in China is quite high … and the negative reaction to China’s policies is rising,” he said.

    “This message actually implies that the number of people who think that human rights and civil rights and cultural rights and religious rights and all other rights which are being violated today within [the XUAR] or within the other regions of China … are universal, so it actually is a common problem of mankind and human rights are universal, regardless of what a national government that is elected or self-appointed says.”

    Klimes said that while the appeal is partly aimed at China, it also called on the governments of Slovakia and the Czech Republic to only take part in Chinese-led trade initiatives “on the condition that human rights are observed within the People’s Republic of China.”

    “We think that in a democratic society, citizens or academics or media can actually initiate a conversation and cooperation with their [own] governments, which will hopefully lead to action from these national governments towards the government of the People’s Republic of China,” he said.


    Mass detentions

    Monday’s statement joined that of 21 rights groups—including Munich-based World Uyghur Congress and U.S.-based International Tibet Network—who called on the international community to “stand up to the Chinese government” over rights violations against Uyghurs, Tibetans and other ethnic minorities.

    Mass detentions in the XUAR have drawn significant attention from the international community, and particularly from the U.S., where lawmakers have called for access to the camps and proposed sanctions against officials and entities in China deemed responsible for abusing the rights of ethnic Uyghurs and other Muslim minorities.

    While Beijing initially denied the existence of re-education camps, the chairman of the XUAR government, Shohrat Zakir, told China’s official Xinhua news agency in October that the facilities are an effective tool to protect the country from terrorism and provide vocational training for Uyghurs.

    But reporting by RFA’s Uyghur Service and other media organizations has shown that those held in the camps are detained against their will, are subjected to political indoctrination and rough treatment at the hands of their overseers, and endure poor diets and unhygienic conditions in the often overcrowded facilities. The atmosphere is more like a prison than any kind of school, multiple sources say.

    The statements marking the 70th anniversary of the UDHR came as RFA learned that authorities in the XUAR capital Urumqi had arrested well-known poet, writer, film director and producer Muhter Bughra, who worked for the Xinjiang People’s TV Station.

    The timing and reason for his arrest was not immediately clear, and sources were unable to confirm whether he had been imprisoned or sent to a re-education camp.



    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/uyg...018162357.html

  23. #248
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    In locked compound, minorities in China make clothes for US


    HOTAN, CHINA
    Barbed wire and hundreds of cameras ring a massive compound of more than 30 dormitories, schools, warehouses and workshops in China's far west. Dozens of armed officers and a growling Doberman stand guard outside.
    Behind locked gates, men and women are sewing sportswear that can end up on U.S. college campuses and sports teams.

    This is one of a growing number of internment camps in the Xinjiang region, where by some estimates 1 million Muslims are detained, forced to give up their language and their religion and subject to political indoctrination. Now, the Chinese government is also forcing some detainees to work in manufacturing and food industries. Some of them are within the internment camps; others are privately owned, state-subsidized factories where detainees are sent once they are released.

    The Associated Press has tracked recent, ongoing shipments from one such factory inside an internment camp to Badger Sportswear, a leading supplier in Statesville, North Carolina. The shipments show how difficult it is to stop products made with forced labor from getting into the global supply chain, even though such imports are illegal in the U.S. Badger CEO John Anton said Sunday that the company would source sportswear elsewhere while it investigates.

    https://www.newsobserver.com/news/bu...ylink=readnext



  24. #249
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    China Targets Prominent Uighur Intellectuals to Erase an Ethnic Identity

    Rahile Dawut, below with camera, is an anthropologist at Xinjiang University who studied Islamic shrines, traditional songs and folklore. She was detained in December 2017 and has not been heard from since.CreditLisa Ross


    By Austin Ramzy (NYT)

    ISTANBUL — As a writer and magazine editor, Qurban Mamut promoted the culture and history of his people, the Uighurs, and that of other Turkic minority groups who live in far western China. He did so within the strict confines of censorship imposed by the Chinese authorities, who are ever wary of ethnic separatism and Islamic extremism among the predominantly Muslim peoples of the region.

    It was a line that Mr. Mamut navigated successfully for 26 years, eventually rising to become editor in chief of the Communist Party-controlled magazine Xinjiang Civilization before retiring in 2011.

    “My father is very smart; he knows what is the red line, and if you cross it you are taken to jail,” said his son, Bahram Sintash, who now lives in Virginia. “You work very close to the red line to teach people the culture. You have to be smart and careful with your words.”
    Then last year, the red line moved. Suddenly, Mr. Mamut and more than a hundred other Uighur intellectuals who had successfully navigated the worlds of academia, art and journalism became the latest targets of a sweeping crackdown in the region of Xinjiang that has ensnared as many as one million Muslims in indoctrination camps.

    The mass detention of some of China’s most accomplished Uighurs has become an alarming symbol of the Communist Party’s most intense social-engineering drive in decades, according to scholars, human rights advocates and exiled Uighurs.
    As the guardians of Uighur traditions, chroniclers of their history and creators of their art, the intellectuals were building the Central Asian, Turkic-speaking society’s reservoir of collective memory within the narrow limits of authoritarian rule. Their detention underscores the party’s attempts to decimate Uighur identity in order to remold the group into a people who are largely secular, integrated into mainstream Chinese culture and compliant with the Communist Party, observers say.
    The Chinese government has described the detentions as a job training program aimed at providing employment opportunities for some of the country’s poorest people. But a list of more than 100 detained Uighur scholars compiled by exiles includes many prominent poets and writers, university heads and professors of everything from anthropology to Uighur history.
    “The fact that highly educated intellectuals and academics and scientists and software engineers are being held in these facilities is one of the best counterarguments to authorities’ claims that this is some kind of educational program meant to benefit Uighurs,” said Maya Wang, a Hong Kong-based researcher for Human Rights Watch.

    The removal of high-profile Uighur scholars familiar with the Chinese government, and the country’s education and legal systems, is aimed at erasing not only the group’s unique ethnic identity but also its ability to defend such traditions, said a Uighur professor now living in Istanbul who asked not to be identified because of possible risks to family in Xinjiang.

    Qurban Mamut, a magazine editor in Xinjiang who has been detained. “My father is very smart; he knows what is the red line,” his son said.


    Qurban Mamut, a magazine editor in Xinjiang who has been detained. “My father is very smart; he knows what is the red line,” his son said.

    Many scholars trace the assault on intellectuals to the imprisonment of Ilham Tohti, a Uighur economist, in 2014. Mr. Tohti, who was an outspoken critic of the discrimination Uighurs face in China, was sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of separatism.
    More detentions came in 2017. Many of those targeted worked on preserving Uighur culture.

    Rahile Dawut, one of the most well known of the disappeared Uighur academics, is an anthropologist at Xinjiang University who studied Islamic shrines, traditional songs and folklore. Ms. Dawut
    was detained in December 2017 and hasn’t been heard from since.


    Before the crackdown, the Uighur intellectual elite offered a bridge between the body of Uighur society, who number about 11 million and are largely poor farmers, and the much wealthier Han Chinese, who dominate economic and political power. The scholars also worked carefully to try to improve the lot of a group that complained of widespread discrimination and draconian restrictions on religious activity.

    These scholars offered a moderate path, where Uighurs could maintain religious and cultural practices without turning to extreme and isolationist ideas, said Rune Steenberg, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Copenhagen.
    “This is the really big tragedy about the clampdown,” Dr. Steenberg said. “They were actually bridge builders of integration of broader Uighur society into modern Chinese society and economy.”
    Many young Uighurs have been inspired by the scholars’ accomplishments, said Erkin Sidick, a Uighur engineer who went to the United States for graduate school in 1988 and now works on telescopes for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Mr. Sidick said hundreds would attend informal talks he gave on pursuing graduate degrees and many closely studied a book he published that compiled biographies of Uighur academics.
    “Uighur people value education very much,” he said.

    Now, Uighurs keep a grimmer list of Uighur intellectuals — those who have disappeared in the current campaign.

    Tahir Hamut, a Uighur poet who lives in Virginia, began working with other Uighur exiles to collect the names of those detained over the past year based on news reports and information from families and classmates. The list has now grown to 159 Uighurs and five others from other minority groups.
    “These people are all the most prestigious in Xinjiang,” Mr. Hamut said. “They are models who all study diligently and raise themselves up. Their arrest is a great injury, a great attack to all Uighurs.”

    The Chinese authorities have accused Uighurs in official positions of being “two-faced,” or mouthing the official line in public but resisting the crackdown in private. Such labels have surrounded the removal of several top administrators at universities in Xinjiang.

    The Xinjiang government propaganda department and the news office for the State Council, China’s cabinet, did not respond to faxed requests for comment. But officials in Xinjiang have clearly stated their resolve to pursue people they see as hindering efforts to rewire Uighurs and steer them from what authorities have called religious extremism.
    “Break their lineage, break their roots, break their connections and break their origins,” wrote Maisumujiang Maimuer, a religious affairs official, in a commentary in the state news media. “Completely shovel up the roots of ‘two-faced people,’ dig them out, and vow to fight these two-faced people until the end.”

    The campaign has not spared scholars who expressed support for the party, such as Abdulqadir Jalaleddin, a scholar of medieval Central Asian poetry at Xinjiang Normal University who worked to preserve Uighur culture and identity.

    “He was a very moderate man who always tried to give a balanced view, so much so that a lot of Uyghur nationalists accused him of selling out to the regime,” Rachel Harris, who studies Uighur music at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and has known Mr. Jalaleddin for more than a decade, said in an email. (Uyghur is an alternative spelling of Uighur.)



    The Xinjiang government propaganda department and the news office for the State Council, China’s cabinet, did not respond to faxed requests for comment. But officials in Xinjiang have clearly stated their resolve to pursue people they see as hindering efforts to rewire Uighurs and steer them from what authorities have called religious extremism.
    “Break their lineage, break their roots, break their connections and break their origins,” wrote Maisumujiang Maimuer, a religious affairs official, in a commentary in the state news media. “Completely shovel up the roots of ‘two-faced people,’ dig them out, and vow to fight these two-faced people until the end.”

    The campaign has not spared scholars who expressed support for the party, such as Abdulqadir Jalaleddin, a scholar of medieval Central Asian poetry at Xinjiang Normal University who worked to preserve Uighur culture and identity.

    “He was a very moderate man who always tried to give a balanced view, so much so that a lot of Uyghur nationalists accused him of selling out to the regime,” Rachel Harris, who studies Uighur music at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and has known Mr. Jalaleddin for more than a decade, said in an email. (Uyghur is an alternative spelling of Uighur.)

    Last year, Mr. Jalaleddin joined a government-led campaign for prominent Uighurs to write open letters declaring their allegiance to the state.
    Despite that declaration, he was detained in January 2018, according to overseas Uighur organizations.
    “So many moderate intellectuals have been detained now,” Dr. Harris said. “I don’t know how else to understand this, except as a deliberate policy to deprive Uyghurs of their cultural memory.”

    It is a pattern that has repeated itself in the far western region. The authorities targeted Uighur intellectuals after the People’s Liberation Army occupied Xinjiang in 1949, and even before in the late 1930s, when Xinjiang was ruled by a Soviet-backed warlord, said Ondrej Klimes, a researcher with the Oriental Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences who studies Xinjiang and the Uighurs.

    “It makes the community easier to be subjugated, more cooperative, more docile,” Dr. Klimes said. “You have this whenever an authoritarian regime comes, they first target intellectuals.”

    By detaining so many influential figures, the government appears to be acknowledging that its efforts to woo Uighurs to accept the primacy of the Chinese state have failed, and that it must use more forceful methods, Dr. Steenberg said.

    “The government has lost,” he said, “and now like a chess player about to lose, it swipes the board.”




    Last edited by tomcat; 06-01-2019 at 06:00 PM.

  25. #250
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    China's mass surveillance of Uyghur Muslims in Xinjian province revealed in data security flaw



    A map showing the density of trackers connected to the SenseNets database.


    China is closely monitoring 2.5 million people in what has been called a "Muslim tracker", exposing millions of records containing sensitive personal information on an unprotected online database, according to a Dutch cyber expert.

    Key points:


    • The database was unprotected online for almost seven months
    • Many names appear to be typically Muslim and located in Xinjiang province
    • Experts say it reveals China's widespread surveillance of the Uyghur minority group


    Victor Gevers, a researcher with GDI.foundation, found names, identification card numbers, birth dates, employers and locations were all exposed for almost seven months on an insecure database run by SenseNets, a company contracted by Chinese police that uses artificial intelligence for facial recognition, crowd analysis and personal verification.
    Attached Images Attached Images

    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

    .

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