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  1. #26
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    With Refugee Camps Overwhelmed, Rohingya Fleeing Myanmar Sleep on Roadsides




    COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH —

    Overwhelmed and underfunded, aid agencies in Bangladesh are at a breaking point. But nearly three weeks into Rakhine State’s bloody conflict and the humanitarian crisis shows no signs of relenting.


    Around 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have now sought refuge in the country's southern state of Chitagong, with the UN’s top human rights official saying Myanmar is carrying out 'a textbook example of ethnic cleansing' against the Rohingya.


    With refugee camps at full capacity and insufficient support from aid agencies, Bangladesh makes for an inhospitable home.


    “Too many Rohingya have arrived, so there is not enough room of us in the camps," said Noor Mohammed, a Rohingya refugee. "We do not know where else to go so we are sleeping on the side of the road. It is very miserable.”


    New arrivals are clearing hectares of forest to make space for the spontaneous settlements that are springing up across the country’s southern border.


    Rumors of a new camp quickly spreads among the roadside population, sparking a desperate scramble for the limited space.


    With little or no access to basic humanitarian services, conditions in these makeshift camps are dire, with some unable to access the life saving assistance required after days walking through the Myanmar jungle.

    “I have been in the camp for three days with my five children, the youngest one is very ill and suffering from malnutrition," said Ansar Begum, while holding her baby in her arms. "I am worried that my child will die if I stay in the camp because we are not getting any support or medical aid.”


    Save for a few tarpaulin sheets, an official humanitarian response is difficult to find among the new Rohingya settlements.With a shortfall of $77 million, the United Nations admits it is unprepared to meet the demands of the growing refugee population

    A water delivery draws a large crowd. Despite lining up for hours, some of the men in line will go home empty handed.

    “We are struggling," said Azmat Ulla of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent. "I believe like many other agencies here, we are struggling for resources. We need resources fast.”

    While the aid organizations wait for their funding to trickle in, it has fallen on the people of Bangladesh to meet the needs of the desperate Rohingya population. Every day, hundreds of citizens rally together to distribute food, water and clothing bought from the local market.

    But their generosity will not sustain a refugee population that is growing day by day. Unless the official response is scaled up soon, this humanitarian crisis might turn into another humanitarian disaster.


    https://www.voanews.com/a/myanmar-ro...s/4028900.html
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  2. #27
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Myanmar says U.S. official barred from Rohingya conflict zone


    YANGON (Reuters) - Myanmar said on Friday a visiting U.S. official would not be allowed to go to a region where violence has triggered an exodus of nearly 400,000 Rohingya Muslims that the United Nations has branded a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing”.


    The Rohingya have fled from western Rakhine state to neighboring Bangladesh to escape a military offensive that has raised questions about Myanmar’s transition to civilian rule under the leadership of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi.


    U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Patrick Murphy will voice Washington’s concerns about the Rohingya and press for greater access to the conflict area for humanitarian workers, the State Department said.


    Myanmar officials said he would meet government leaders in the capital, Naypyitaw, and attend an address to the nation by Suu Kyi on Tuesday.


    He would also visit Sittwe, the state capital, and meet the governor of Rakhine, the state government secretary, Tin Maung Swe, told Reuters, but the north of the state, where the conflict erupted on Aug. 25 would be off limits.


    “Not allowed,” Tin Maung Swe said, when asked if Murphy would be going to Maungdaw district, at the heart of the strife that began when Rohingya insurgents attacked police posts and an army camp, killing a dozen people.

    more Myanmar says U.S. official barred from Rohingya conflict zone | Reuters

  3. #28
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    Published on Sep 13, 2017
    Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims are escaping Myanmar and paying a price to do so.

    It follows a two-week surge in violence in majority Buddhist Myanmar that the UN say appears to be a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

    Sky correspondent Ashish Joshi met some of them. Watch our special report.





  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermantheGerman View Post
    left something out






    We seem to have seen this behaviour before.
    As you say perfidious Albion always withdraws and leave many conflicts behind.

    Here is part of one view:

    https://rlp.hds.harvard.edu/faq/rohingya

    Once again a Albions decisions lead to chaos.

    "British Colonialism & WWII
    British colonialism shifted power balances and generated deep tensions between Burmese Buddhists and Muslims. The British took Arakan in their first campaign against Myanmar in 1824–1826, and encouraged an influx of Bengali Indian migrants. By the early 20th century, the immigrant population was twice the size of the local Muslim population. As the Muslim Rohingya community absorbed new migrants its religious networks expanded and the Rohingya began to look, dress, and act differently from their Buddhist neighbors. The growing population pushed into the south, displacing some Buddhist villages.


    These changes led to competition over resources with Buddhists. Worse still, the Rohingya sided with the British against the Japanese in WWII while the dominant Burman ethnicity was barred from joining the military. Rohingya engaged in armed combat with Burmese Buddhists who supported the Japanese against the British, which degenerated into cycles of retributive violence on the village level. The British appointed Rohingya to positions of power in the post-war government, from which some retaliated against Buddhists who had harmed them during the war. Additionally, some Muslims believed that the British would grant them an autonomous area following the war, and of those, some hoped to secede from Myanmar and join with India or Pakistan. In 1946, a few Muslim political leaders announced their intentions to form an independent Muslim state, and in the following year met with Ali Jinnah, who would go on to found Pakistan."
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilsonandson View Post
    Published on Sep 13, 2017
    Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims are escaping Myanmar and paying a price to do so.

    It follows a two-week surge in violence in majority Buddhist Myanmar that the UN say appears to be a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

    Sky correspondent Ashish Joshi met some of them. Watch our special report.




    But the UN looks away when it is "acceptable" ethnic cleansing , yes?

  6. #31
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Bangladesh Government to Build Camp for 400,000 Rohingya Muslim Refugees

    The Bangladesh government plans to construct a large camp to house some 400,000 Rohingya Muslims who have poured in from neighboring Myanmar over the past three weeks, officials said.


    Authorities said 14,000 shelters, each able to accommodate six families, will be built over the next 10 days on an eight square kilometer site near the Bangladesh-Myanmar border.


    The government said the movement of the settlement's refugees would be restricted.


    "The Royingya refugees won't be allowed to go outside the camp," Bangladeshi Minister of Home Affairs Asaduzzaman Khan said on September 10. They will also be prohibited from traveling by vehicle in Bangladesh.


    more https://www.voanews.com/a/bangladesh...r/4031861.html

  7. #32
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    Published on Jul 11, 2017
    Encouraged by talks in Bangladesh and Myanmar, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi today called for more opportunities for Myanmar refugees in Bangladesh alongside action to improve conditions back home to support sustainable return. The High Commissioner wrapped up his visit to Bangladesh on Tuesday after meeting with Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar.

    Some 350,000 Rohingya have fled Myanmar in search of protection in Bangladesh, including an estimated 74,000 who arrived in late 2016 as a result of a security crackdown in northern Rakhine state.


  8. #33
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    it seems these refugees have been crossing and recrossing the Bangladesh/Myanmar border for some years.

    Word goes out that XXX is building an new camp, no discussion just the sound of pots and pans being packed and the searching for a good pair of walking boots.

    Cue pictures of women and children up to their necks in rice paddies and behind them the smoke of burning jungle. Oh that was Vietnam ............

  9. #34
    Thailand Expat HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    As you say perfidious Albion always withdraws and leave many conflicts behind.

    Here is part of one view:

    https://rlp.hds.harvard.edu/faq/rohingya

    Once again a Albions decisions lead to chaos.

    "British Colonialism & WWII
    British colonialism shifted power balances and generated deep tensions between Burmese Buddhists and Muslims. The British took Arakan in their first campaign against Myanmar in 1824–1826, and encouraged an influx of Bengali Indian migrants. By the early 20th century, the immigrant population was twice the size of the local Muslim population. As the Muslim Rohingya community absorbed new migrants its religious networks expanded and the Rohingya began to look, dress, and act differently from their Buddhist neighbors. The growing population pushed into the south, displacing some Buddhist villages.


    These changes led to competition over resources with Buddhists. Worse still, the Rohingya sided with the British against the Japanese in WWII while the dominant Burman ethnicity was barred from joining the military. Rohingya engaged in armed combat with Burmese Buddhists who supported the Japanese against the British, which degenerated into cycles of retributive violence on the village level. The British appointed Rohingya to positions of power in the post-war government, from which some retaliated against Buddhists who had harmed them during the war. Additionally, some Muslims believed that the British would grant them an autonomous area following the war, and of those, some hoped to secede from Myanmar and join with India or Pakistan. In 1946, a few Muslim political leaders announced their intentions to form an independent Muslim state, and in the following year met with Ali Jinnah, who would go on to found Pakistan."

    An interesting, if not predictable, perspective from particular scholarly corners.
    Six degrees of separation analogies as such applies to the domino effect of historic imperial conquest.


    Regardless of geopolitical theories, historic interpretations, and current ethnic sociological difference - it's a tragic and unnecessary mess.
    Reflective of power mongers - historic and contemporary.

  10. #35
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Myanmar mob attacks aid shipment headed to Rohingya area



    YANGON--Police in western Myanmar fired warning shots after a Buddhist mob tried to block humanitarian aid headed to an area where ethnic Rohingya Muslims were driven from their homes, police said Thursday. No injuries were reported and police arrested eight participants.


    Around 300 men started throwing rocks and Molotov cocktails at officers protecting a truck delivering supplies from the International Committee of the Red Cross to a jetty in the Rakhine state capital, Sittwe, said police officer Phyo Wai Kyaw.


    The bottled water, blankets, mosquito nets, food and other supplies were being delivered by boat to northern Rakhine, where members of the long-persecuted Rohingya community have been without any meaningful form of humanitarian assistance since violence broke out last month, sending an estimated 421,000 fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh.


    The exodus followed a military crackdown in response to coordinated attacks by Rohingya militants on security forces. Hundreds of thousands Rohingya Muslims and Buddhist Rakhine are still in the area.


    Though Myanmar's leader Aung San Suu Kyi assured diplomats earlier this week that humanitarian assistance was being delivered to those in need, the government has blocked United Nations aid agencies that have worked in the area in the past.


    Buddhists in Rakhine have accused international aid groups of favoring Rohingya.


    "We are explaining to the community members who approached the boats about the activities of the Red Cross," said Maria Cecilia Goin, a communications officer at the ICRC Yangon.


    "It's important for them to understand that we are working in neutral and impartial way," she said, adding that the work is being done "with full transparency with the Myanmar authorities."





    Myanmar mob attacks aid shipment headed to Rohingya area?The Asahi Shimbun

  11. #36
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    No way back for Myanmar’s Rohingya refugees

    Myanmar’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi says that her government is prepared to begin taking back Rohingya refugees recently driven into Bangladesh in a national verification process. Suu Kyi said the repatriation can start “at any time” in a speech on September 19, her first since the refugee crisis began in late August after a surge of insurgent attacks and harsh military counter-measures.


    The violence has pushed an estimated 420,000 mostly Muslim refugees into Bangladesh, which considers them natives of Myanmar and calls for their full return. While Suu Kyi’s offer to accept “verified” refugees may have aimed to defuse international criticism of military “clearance operations” the United Nations has likened to “ethnic cleansing”, it’s altogether unclear how many of the departed the autonomous armed forces will accept back.


    Exactly how many Rohingya live in conflict-ridden western Rakhine state is debatable because Myanmar-conducted censuses don’t recognize the Rohingya as an ethnic group. The 1.1 -1.5 million figures quoted in international media reports are made without reference to any official or credible independent source.




    According to the most recent 2014 census and UN estimates, the combined population of Rakhine state’s three northwestern townships of Maungdaw, Buthidaung and Rathedaung – where the conflict is confined – before the recent exodus was around 950,000, of which between 80% and 90% were Muslims. It is uncertain how many of those Muslims would identify themselves as Rohingya – a contested term in Rakhine state where ethnic Kaman and other minority Muslim groups reside – but in any counting the total number of Muslims there is well below one million.


    The total population of Rakhine state is 3.2 million with a clear Buddhist majority, according to the latest census. Whatever the correct figure may be, it appears that nearly half of the Muslim population of the three affected northwestern townships have recently been forced to flee into Bangladesh.


    Myanmar’s military has deployed more than 70 battalions to Rakhine state to carry out its clearance operations, nominally aimed to flush out insurgents hiding in civilian populations. With both regular and light infantry battalions deployed, security analysts estimate there are between 30,000-35,000 Myanmar troops now on the ground in Rakhine state.


    The deployment of that many troops must be motivated by strategic considerations other than suppression of the emergent Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA), a vicious but small group of rag-tag guerrillas fighting with mostly rudimentary weapons. According to military insiders, the overriding strategic aim is to “balance” the demographic composition of the state’s three Muslim-majority townships.


    According to well-placed sources in Yangon, the military aims to reduce the Muslim majority in the northwestern townships to no more than 60%, with Buddhists making up the remaining 40%. Towards that demographic aim, the sources say, the military is now preparing to resettle thousands of ethnic Rakhines and other Buddhists into the Rakhine area’s now abandoned and burned out villages.


    The Muslims that are ultimately permitted to return will undoubtedly be put through a deliberately torturous process rooted in deeply contentious history.


    Suu Kyi’s reference to a “verification” process harks to an April 1992 joint statement made by then Bangladeshi foreign minister Mostafizur Rahman and his Myanmar counterpart Ohn Gyaw that said Myanmar’s government agreed “there would be no restriction on number of persons [repatriated] as long as they could establish bona fide evidence of their residence in Myanmar.”


    At that time, an estimated 250,000 Rohingya Muslims from Rakhine state had taken refuge in Bangladesh after a border skirmish which had resulted in a military crackdown on the Myanmar side. As with the current humanitarian crisis, the flight of refugees into Bangladesh in the early 1990s also attracted big international media attention and support from the Arab and Muslim worlds.


    Prince Khaled Sultan Abdul Aziz, then commander of the Saudi Arabian contingent in the 1991 Gulf War, visited Dhaka and recommended a Desert Storm like (the name of the US-led campaign to drive Iraq out of Kuwait) action against Myanmar. That multinational offensive never came to fruition, but Myanmar eventually agreed to take back the refugees under United Nations’ pressure and on the terms of its verification agreement with Bangladesh.


    Many but not all returned to Myanmar; it was uncertain how many actually stayed in Rakhine state or returned to Bangladesh because little remained of the villages they had left behind. Some had been destroyed while others were populated in their absence by migrants from other parts of Myanmar. The area between Bangladesh’s city of Chittagong and Teknaf on the Naaf river which forms the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar is still full of people who claim they were born and grew up on the Myanmar side.


    The early 1990s exodus was the second big movement in modern times. The first came in 1978 when 200,000 Muslims from Rakhine state fled to Bangladesh as Myanmar security authorities carried out an operation against illegal immigrants codenamed Naga Min, or “Dragon King.” That crisis also led to a repatriation agreement between Myanmar and Bangladesh signed on July 9, 1978.


    That agreement was not different from what was stated in 1992, namely that Myanmar agreed to the earliest repatriation of its lawful residents on the presentation of [Myanmar] national registration cards. Some, but far from all, Muslims in Rakhine’s three northwestern townships have proper government issued identification cards or citizenship papers. Others have been systematically denied such documents and being effectively stateless face restrictions on their movements in Myanmar.


    Now as then, Myanmar’s policy remains the same: only those who can produce proof of citizenship or residency will be allowed back. That may not be an unreasonable demand, but it will be a messy and contentious task given the current chaos and deprivation along the border and in refugee camps. It’s unclear how many of the estimated 420,000 refugees Myanmar will actually be taken back and how much international pressure will factor into that human calculation.


    What is clear is that the Myanmar armed forces that carried out the brutal and controversial clearance operations in border areas don’t want the Muslims back as strategic planners aim to rebalance the region’s ethnic demographics.


    Judging from anti-Rohingya and anti-Muslim demonstrations recently held in Yangon and other Myanmar cities, it’s a stance shared by many Myanmar citizens who don’t consider the Rohingya a national ethnic group but rather illegal immigrants.


    Yet another bilateral repatriation agreement will likely be signed in the coming days that allows for some refugees to return to Myanmar to placate both Bangladesh and the international community. But given the deliberately high hurdles to proving Myanmar citizenship or residency, and a military bent on using the crisis as an opportunity to change the area’s demographics, the repatriation will likely be smaller than seen in the late 1970s and early 1990s.


    In the meantime, Rakhine state’s once predominantly Muslim region will remain heavily militarized, both to guard against ARSA from carrying out further attacks on undermanned security outposts and to prevent unverified refugees from returning across the border.


    Regardless of any new bilateral agreement, recent events will be leveraged to create a new ethnic balance in Rakhine state, one with less Muslims, more Buddhists and over which Myanmar’s military has absolute control.





    No way back for Myanmar's Rohingya refugees | Asia Times

  12. #37
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Myanmar police: Insurgents killed 28 Hindu women, boys in Rakhine

    YANGON--Myanmar police said Monday that they have discovered at least 28 slain Hindu women and boys in two mass graves in the Southeast Asian country's conflict-torn northern Rakhine state. The government blames Muslim insurgents for the killings.


    Myanmar Border Guard Police Maj. Zayar Nyein in northern Rakhine said the graves were discovered Sunday and contain bodies of 20 females and eight males, and that more bodies are believed to be buried.


    The government's Information Committee said on its Facebook page that all eight were boys, including six under 10 years old.


    Police blame the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army insurgent group, or ARSA. Security forces say the bodies are among about 100 Hindus missing since ARSA attacked at least 30 police outposts Aug. 25.


    There was no immediate way to independently verify the government's assertions.


    A government crackdown that followed the attacks left more than 200 Rohingya Muslim villages burned and sent at least 420,000 Rohingya fleeing into Bangladesh. The government has said most of the hundreds of people who were killed were insurgents.


    The Information Committee said the 28 bodies were found in Yebawkya village of Maungdaw township, which was hardest hit by the violence.


    It said a Hindu man who lived in the village and has since fled to Bangladesh told a local leader that ARSA insurgents took about 100 Hindus from the village and killed all of them except for eight women who were forced to convert to Islam and brought to Bangladesh.


    The committee said nearby residents searched and found two pits holding the bodies in the northwest part of the village.





    Myanmar police: Insurgents killed 28 Hindu women, boys in Rakhine?The Asahi Shimbun

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    Myanmar Proposes to Take Back Rohingya Sheltering in Bangladesh

    Myanmar is willing to take back Rohingya refugees who fled to southeastern Bangladesh, the Bangladeshi foreign minister said Monday, after ending day-long talks with a trio of diplomats from Naypyidaw.


    No timeframe was set for the repatriation process, nor did officials clarify how many of the 900,000 Rohingya refugees sheltering in Bangladesh would be able to participate.


    “Myanmar has proposed taking back the Rohingya refugees. For the supervision of overall repatriation process, the two sides have agreed to form a Joint Working Group,” Foreign Minister A.H. Mahmood Ali told reporters at the Padma State Guest House in Dhaka, where the meeting took place under tight security.


    Kyaw Tint Swe, the minister for the Office of the State Counsellor of Myanmar, led Naypyidaw’s delegation, but did not speak to reporters. The Myanmar delegation was due to return home early Tuesday, after arriving in Bangladesh early Monday.


    Ali said the two sides had reached a “consensus” on the issue in their first high-level diplomatic encounter since violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state beginning in late August drove half a million new refugees into Bangladesh, triggering a humanitarian crisis.


    “We, both the sides, want to resolve the problem in a peaceful way. And both the sides have reached a consensus,” said Ali.


    On multiple occasions in recent weeks, Bangladesh’s foreign ministry summoned Myanmar’s ambassador to complain about incursions by Burmese military aircraft into Bangladeshi airspace as well as reports that Myanmar troops were planting land-mines along the frontier to prevent Rohingya from fleeing.


    Neither of these issues was raised during Monday’s talks, officials close to the negotiations told BenarNews, an RFA-affiliated online news service.


    “One meeting will not resolve all problems ... No timeframe has been set. But it [the Joint Working Group] will be formed very soon,” Ali said, adding that he was “very optimistic” about future talks between the two neighboring countries.


    “Very fruitful talks took place. Bangladesh reiterated its zero tolerance on terrorism,” he said, apparently referring to insurgents from the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) whose attacks on police outposts in Rakhine state on Aug. 25 resulted in a brutal military crackdown.



    ‘Our next immediate priority’


    In Geneva, meanwhile, Win Myat Aye, Myanmar’s union minister of social welfare, relief and resettlement, told the U.N. refugee agency on Monday that “[o]ur next immediate priority is to bring back the refugees who have fled to Bangladesh.”


    “The repatriation process can start any time for those who wish to return to Myanmar,” the minister said, according to Agence France-Presse.


    “The verification of refugees will be based on the agreement between the Myanmar and Bangladesh governments in 1993,” he said, adding, “Those who have been verified as refugees from this country will be accepted without any problem and with full assurance of their security and their access to human dignity.”


    Last week, Myanmar’s government said it would build two repatriation camps in Rakhine state for Rohingya who had fled to Bangladesh.


    Myanmar’s minister of labor, immigration and population told reporters on Thursday that the government would send forms to Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh to start the process, RFA's Myanmar Service reported.




    ‘Unimaginable’


    In Rakhine on Monday, three helicopters ferried some 50 foreign diplomats on a tour of areas of state that were hit by the recent violence, RFA reported.


    Diplomats from Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, India, Pakistan, the United States, France, Denmark and the European Union took part in the visit to the villages of Khamaungsake, Nurular and Shwe Zar in Maungdaw Township where violent attacks had occurred, as well as Pantaw Pyin Muslim village, where no violence had been reported.


    A statement issued by the U.N. office in Yangon expressed appreciation for the government-organized visit, in which three U.N. representatives took part.


    “The scale of human suffering is unimaginable and the U.N. extends its deepest condolences to all those affected,” the statement said.


    “The U.N. advocates for the end to the cycle of violence and for establishing law and order and the rule of law; to allow unfettered access for humanitarian support; and to ensure the safe, voluntary, dignified and sustainable return of the refugees to their areas of origin.”


    It also urged Myanmar to grant the media and human rights advocates greater access to the area to assess “the concerns and needs of all communities in affected areas.”


    Myanmar Proposes to Take Back Rohingya Sheltering in Bangladesh

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    UN, Bangladesh Brace for New Surge of Rohingya Refugees from Myanmar



    At least 11,000 more refugees from Myanmar’s Rakhine state arrived in Bangladesh in a single day on Monday, prompting the U.N. to declare “it was back in a situation of full alert” as it anticipated a new surge in arrivals.


    More than half a million Rohingya refugees have crossed the border since late August and, on Tuesday, more were entering southeastern Bangladesh “like flashfloods,” local officials told BenarNews, an RFA-affiliated online news service. They added that tens of thousands more had amassed along the frontier.


    “Those who have come here told us that many others are still waiting to come to Bangladesh,” said Md Ali Hossain, the deputy commissioner of Cox’s Bazar district.


    Zafar Alam, a Rohingya leader at the Kutupalong camp, the largest of the refugee camps and settlements in southeastern Bangladesh, said 11,000 people from nine villages in Buthidaung and Rathedaung – two townships that are further inland inside Rakhine – were among the latest arrivals in Bangladesh.


    “They crossed the Naf River along with their kids. They have taken shelter in different places in Teknaf [sub-district]. Nearly 50,000 are still waiting to cross the border,” he told BenarNews.


    In Geneva, the U.N.’s refugee agency (UNHCR) said it was preparing to rush relief supplies to Bangladesh in order to deal with “a fresh refugee surge.”


    “UNHCR is working with the Bangladesh authorities on a transit center to prepare for a potential refugee influx in the coming days. This is in view of yesterday’s sudden increase in in people arriving from Myanmar,” agency spokesman Adrian Edwards told a press briefing Tuesday, according to a news release from UNHCR.


    “We’re back in a situation of full alert as far as influxes are concerned. It is a big increase to see 11,000,” Edwards said, according to Reuters.


    The number that he cited was based on information provided by Bangladeshi border guards.


    The influx since late August, which the United Nations secretary-general has called the “world’s fastest-developing refugee emergency,” has strained humanitarian resources in southeastern Bangladesh. More than 900,000 Rohingya refugees, including those who fled earlier cycles of violence in Rakhine, are now concentrated on the Bangladeshi side of the border.


    “[M]any of the new refugees came from the Buthidaung area in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine state …. Some of them said they fled torching and killings back home,” Edwards told reporters, referring to the more than 11,000 who arrived on Monday.


    Cases of HIV-AIDS reported


    U.N. officials have warned that refugees, who include many women and children, are vulnerable to outbreaks of water-borne disease such as cholera, and at least one local physician reported that there were some cases of HIV-AIDS among the new arrivals.


    “At least 16 Rohingya people have been identified as AIDS patients,” Dr. Md Abdus Salam, a doctor in Cox’s Bazar, told BenarNews.


    Other people were suffering from tuberculosis, hepatitis-B and -C, as well as skin ailments, he said.


    “Most of the Rohingyas are suffering from different diseases due mainly to malnutrition,” Salam said.


    Meanwhile, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced Tuesday that it and Bangladesh’s Health Ministry had kicked off a massive campaign to immunize some 900,000 refugees from cholera, in two stages. More than 200 mobile teams will vaccinate some 650,000 people aged one and older during the first stage. The second stage, starting Oct. 31, will target 250,000 children aged one to five, WHO said in a news release.


    The campaign will be the second biggest one against cholera behind an oral vaccination campaign in Haiti last year, WHO officials said.


    “Emergency vaccination saves lives. The risk of cholera is clear and present, and the need for decisive action apparent,” said Dr. N. Paranietharan, WHO’s representative to Bangladesh.


    Without a state


    As of Monday, 521,000 refugees had crossed into Bangladesh from Myanmar since late August, according to a situation report published Tuesday by the Inter Sector Coordination Group. The ISCG orchestrates the humanitarian response among international agencies and aid groups to the refugee situation in Bangladesh.


    The refugees were fleeing from violence that broke out in Rakhine after an insurgent group called the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) attacked police outposts there on Aug. 25.


    This led to a crackdown by the Myanmar military and Buddhist militias, who have been accused of targeting Rohingya civilians in atrocities, such as killings and burnings of Rohingya villages. The Muslim minority group is stateless because Rohingya are not recognized as citizens in the Buddhist-majority country.


    Myanmar authorities have rejected international criticism that the military targeted Rohingya in ethnic cleansing, and blamed the violence on ARSA insurgents. Half of Rakhine’s Muslim population, which stood at around 1 million, has fled to Bangladesh since late August.


    Pope is coming


    In related news on Tuesday, the Vatican released the schedule for the upcoming trip to Myanmar and Bangladesh by Pope Francis, who has addressed the plight of the Rohingya people in recent sermons.


    The pontiff will travel to Myanmar from Nov. 27 to 30 and then go to Bangladesh for the next three days, according to a schedule published by Vatican Radio.


    Francis is scheduled to meet with government leaders in both countries, but visits to Rakhine state and refugee camps in southeastern Bangladesh are not on the program.


    UN, Bangladesh Brace for New Surge of Rohingya Refugees from Myanmar

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    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Raw: Drone Video Shows Rohingya Fleeing Myanmar

    United Nations drone video shows scores of Rohingya refugees fleeing from Myanmar to Bangladesh. The UN says 500,000 Rohingya have crossed the border in just five weeks. They're fleeing a military crackdown that the UN calls ethnic cleansing. (Oct. 17)





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    ^ Seems a new Chinese built highway or railway is required to save all these poor people. Give Xi a ring I'm sure they would be interested in "helping" the down trodden masses. Possibly some investment in Myanmar may persuade the locals to get a job/home/life rather than being blacklisted by the western "leaders". I'm sure if they sat down they might concoct a plan for a peaceful Asia rather than a ME2 Experience.

  18. #43
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^In Rohingya crisis, Myanmar again finds a best friend in China

    YANGON -- Condemned worldwide for the persecution of the Rohingya Muslim minority, Myanmar and its public are warming to China, an old ally.


    more https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Eco...riend-in-China





    Myanmar Rohingya crisis: Bangladesh plea over 'untenable' exodus



    Almost a million Rohingya people have fled Myanmar for Bangladesh, placing the country in an "untenable" position, Bangladesh's envoy to the UN says.


    Violence against Rohingya in Rakhine, northern Myanmar (Burma), continues, Shameem Ahsan said. "Thousands still enter on a daily basis," he added.


    About 600,000 have crossed the border since August, when militant attacks in Rakhine triggered an army offensive.


    Mr Ahsan was speaking at a conference in Geneva to raise funds for victims.


    About $340m (£260m) has been pledged so far. The UN is seeking $434m, which it says will help more than a million people for six months.


    Aid agencies describe conditions in Bangladeshi camps as appalling. There is a lack of clean water, shelter and food, and many children are traumatised.


    "This is an untenable situation," Mr Ahsan told the conference. He said aid was vital until Myanmar agreed to a "safe, dignified, voluntary return of its nationals back to their homes".


    "This blatant denial of the ethnic identity of Rohingyas remains a stumbling block," Mr Ahsan said.


    The UN has called the crisis a "textbook example of ethnic cleansing".


    The latest exodus began on 25 August after Rohingya militants attacked police posts, killing 12 members of the security forces.


    Those attacks led to a crackdown by Myanmar troops. The military says it is fighting insurgents but those who have fled say troops and Buddhists are conducting a brutal campaign to drive them out.


    Before the latest influx, Bangladesh was home to 300,000 Rohingya who had escaped earlier outbreaks of violence in Rakhine.


    The head of the UN refugee agency, Filippo Grandi, said the two countries had begun talks on repatriation but the necessary conditions did not yet exist for the return of the Rohingya.


    Myanmar Rohingya crisis: Bangladesh plea over 'untenable' exodus - BBC News

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thai3 View Post
    it's Islam again and the inability of the followers to live alongside other communities in peace.
    It's some people, egged on by war seeking/throat slitting funders, trainers, armers who have their own agenda. Many Muslims live in peace and quiet around the world.


    Seem familiar to you? This time a Muslim coalition, Allegedly including Turkey, Saudi and Iran will assist in "solving the problem" Those worthy warriors/ throat slitters from Iraq, Syria, Yemen Sudan, Nigeria ........ have to have new virgins!!!

    As "suggested" in post #21 -

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Why worry the ameristanis and brits are training, arming, inserting and managing the terrorists. All will become clear as it has, to some, in so many places where they have stepped in to "help".
    The comatose, twitching corpse of ameristan and vassals must be fed more blood and keep others contained. Trouble is there are lots of trees in Myanmar, the old empires aren't so adept at winning battles in such situations, well those plus flat sandy places and those where it's a little hilly.

    I wonder how many of the bought and paid for ameristani leaders, officials and lawmakers know where the country is.


    US declaration of ethnic cleansing in Myanmar on way






    "WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved toward a condemnation of “ethnic cleansing” against Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims, as officials were preparing a recommendation for Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to unequivocally use the term for the first time. Angry lawmakers on Tuesday demanded an immediate denunciation as they explored a new, tougher U.S. policy.
    “My bosses have said it appears to be ethnic cleansing. I’m of that view as well,” said Patrick Murphy, a senior U.S. diplomat for Southeast Asia, while adding that the final call wasn’t his to make.

    Tillerson could receive the recommendation to adopt such terminology as a matter of policy as early as this week, officials familiar with the process told The Associated Press. He would then decide whether to follow the advice of his agency’s policy experts and lawyers, which would raise pressure on the U.S. government to consider new sanctions on a country that had been lauded for its democratic transition.

    At a Senate hearing Tuesday, lawmakers pressed Murphy and other administration officials to hastily clarify their view of the brutal crackdown on Muslims in Rakhine State that has caused more than 600,000 refugees to flee to Bangladesh. But U.S. officials have been weighing several factors for their policy toward the country also known as Burma, including concerns about undermining the civilian government led by Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi for the last 18 months."


    https://www.apnews.com/a901c08e4c9d4...Myanmar-on-way
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    Last edited by OhOh; 25-10-2017 at 03:34 PM.

  20. #45
    Thailand Expat HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    It's some people, egged on by war seeking/throat slitting funders, trainers, armers who have their own agenda. Many Muslims live in peace and quiet around the world.


    Seem familiar to you? This time a Muslim coalition, Allegedly including Turkey, Saudi and Iran will assist in "solving the problem" Those worthy warriors/ throat slitters from Iraq, Syria, Yemen Sudan, Nigeria ........ have to have new virgins!!!

    As "suggested" in post #21 -



    The comatose, twitching corpse of ameristan and vassals must be fed more blood and keep others contained. Trouble is there are lots of trees in Myanmar, the old empires aren't so adept at winning battles in such situations, well those plus flat sandy places and those where it's a little hilly.

    I wonder how many of the bought and paid for ameristani leaders, officials and lawmakers know where the country is.


    US declaration of ethnic cleansing in Myanmar on way






    "WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved toward a condemnation of “ethnic cleansing” against Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims, as officials were preparing a recommendation for Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to unequivocally use the term for the first time. Angry lawmakers on Tuesday demanded an immediate denunciation as they explored a new, tougher U.S. policy.
    “My bosses have said it appears to be ethnic cleansing. I’m of that view as well,” said Patrick Murphy, a senior U.S. diplomat for Southeast Asia, while adding that the final call wasn’t his to make.

    Tillerson could receive the recommendation to adopt such terminology as a matter of policy as early as this week, officials familiar with the process told The Associated Press. He would then decide whether to follow the advice of his agency’s policy experts and lawyers, which would raise pressure on the U.S. government to consider new sanctions on a country that had been lauded for its democratic transition.

    At a Senate hearing Tuesday, lawmakers pressed Murphy and other administration officials to hastily clarify their view of the brutal crackdown on Muslims in Rakhine State that has caused more than 600,000 refugees to flee to Bangladesh. But U.S. officials have been weighing several factors for their policy toward the country also known as Burma, including concerns about undermining the civilian government led by Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi for the last 18 months."


    https://www.apnews.com/a901c08e4c9d4...Myanmar-on-way


    Wonder what the sense of the world might be if these innocent folks weren't of the Islamic persuasion.
    The imaginary and highly promoted boogieman continues to rule the day.


    A note on ethnic cleansing in contemporary Myanmar:
    Never was the same uproar when ethic Karen and others in the north were being systematically exterminated for decades by the purer "Central Burmese" culture under the same rhymes and reason that are being used against the relatively peaceful Rohingya today.

    Where was the great outcry over those years?

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Where was the great outcry over those years?
    It was everywhere. Were you living on another planet? How do you think the entire world learned the name of Aung San Su Kyi? The whole world knew and protested what has been happening in Burma over the years. The reason for the increased outcry now is that Su Ky was expected to heal the divisions, not exacerbate them.
    The Above Post May Contain Strong Language, Flashing Lights, or Violent Scenes.

  22. #47
    Thailand Expat HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    It was everywhere. Were you living on another planet? How do you think the entire world learned the name of Aung San Su Kyi? The whole world knew and protested what has been happening in Burma over the years. The reason for the increased outcry now is that Su Ky was expected to heal the divisions, not exacerbate them.

    How's that working for ya today, Bob?
    The much beloved Noble Peace winner is standing around looking after herself first instead of walking the walk.
    Her truer colours bleeding. Same as it ever was.

    Charlatan. Was from the get go.
    Personally, I never bought into it.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    The imaginary and highly promoted boogieman
    Not so imaginary.



    Possibly a successful pirate and booty?

    Some believe the term originated to mean the Indonesian "pirates" attacking the spice traders ships back in the 15th century.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    The reason for the increased outcry now is that Su Ky was expected to heal the divisions, not exacerbate them.
    Nah, the unelected western puppet Su Ky has been bypassed. The finger of hate is pointed at the evil military, thus allowing the western installed "princess" to retain her vassal status.

  25. #50
    Thailand Expat HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Nah, the unelected western puppet Su Ky has been bypassed. The finger of hate is pointed at the evil military, thus allowing the western installed "princess" to retain her vassal status.
    Yep. Close enough.
    She's almost been reinvented as a new twisted martyr state-of-mind within some circles.
    Others aren't buying the bollocks.

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