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  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainNemo View Post

    Quote Originally Posted by ChalkyDee View Post
    there is absolutely no question about this.
    There absolutely is a question about this, and that's what I'm trying to get an unequivocal answer to. You may well be able to go through a process and get what looks like effective dual nationality, but in reality nobody has presented any evidence that dual nationality actually exists as an option for foreign(-born) immigrant adults as an unequivocal legal fact, but there is evidence that it does not.

    This is not a personalised thing, it's just about establishing the facts.

    (someone seems to have removed my previous response to this, which is bang out of order, this is a legitimate interrogation of a legal claim being made publically).
    Sorry, I can't edit the "Quote" function - but this a reply directed at "Captain Nemo".

    A couple of my Posts (which I think were innocuous and, frankly, informative) have un-explainably been deleted by the Mods, which to me disturbs and confuses the flow of information in this Thread!

    In one of my earlier - deleted - Posts (again addressed to "Captain Nemo") I seem recall you referred to something like "unexpected consequences" if one attained Thai Nationality in addition to ones own "birthright" Nationality: I pointed out that the only possible (extremely rare!) (as in - never been heard of) "unexpected consequence" would only be that the Thai Authorities COULD rescind your Thai Citizenship - however even in that unusual circumstance you would retain the citizenship of your birth and only relinquish the Thai Citizenship.

    NO Country can force anyone to relinquish their Citizenship of another Country.

    Thailand has absolutely NO legislation disallowing Dual Nationality'.

    It seems you are asking us to prove a negative.

    As an aside, 'though relevant, - please see below.

    Vide

    Nulla poena sine lege (Latin for "no penalty without a law") is a legal principle, requiring that one cannot be punished for doing something that is not prohibited by law. This principle is accepted and codified in modern democratic states as a basic requirement of the rule of law.

    Patrick

  2. #127
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    ??????????? 2 ?? ??? ??????? ??????????

    The only problem that I've heard of Dual Citizens having is when they mix up which ones they are using.

    Maybe one more problem - I have a Thai friend who now lives in the USA, married to a Yank. who recently she said that she wouldn't take US citizenship as the inheritance law is rather vague on Dual Citizenship for married Thai women. She is a real Hi So, ie the present king went to her wedding, so a lot of money is probably at stake.

    There's a lot of stuff on the net regarding this.
    Last edited by ChalkyDee; 25-06-2017 at 10:21 PM.

  3. #128
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    Just an update, submitted the hopefully final documents to Special Branch this week and now waiting for approval and an appointment with the SB in Bangkok. Felt like giving up at times but going ahead now.

  4. #129
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
    Sorry, I can't edit the "Quote" function - but this a reply directed at "Captain Nemo".

    A couple of my Posts (which I think were innocuous and, frankly, informative) have un-explainably been deleted by the Mods, which to me disturbs and confuses the flow of information in this Thread!

    In one of my earlier - deleted - Posts (again addressed to "Captain Nemo") I seem recall you referred to something like "unexpected consequences" if one attained Thai Nationality in addition to ones own "birthright" Nationality: I pointed out that the only possible (extremely rare!) (as in - never been heard of) "unexpected consequence" would only be that the Thai Authorities COULD rescind your Thai Citizenship - however even in that unusual circumstance you would retain the citizenship of your birth and only relinquish the Thai Citizenship.

    NO Country can force anyone to relinquish their Citizenship of another Country.

    Thailand has absolutely NO legislation disallowing Dual Nationality'.

    It seems you are asking us to prove a negative.
    Quite the opposite, I'm asking you to prove a positive. You assert that there is such a thing as dual nationality that can be actually acquired by foreign-born adults.
    All the evidence presented is that you can have only one citizenship if you are citizen of Thailand, as indicated by the reported requirement to state that you intend to give up your other (in this case UK) citizenship.
    Can you explain how this tallies with your assertion that there is no legislation that disallows dual nationality? If you have more up-to-date information that supersedes the section of law that describes resumption of Thai citizenship by Thais marrying foreigners, that would be helpful, given that lots of people surfing around may appreciate that.
    Stating an intention to give up citizenship may be a legal nicety, but it does put a person in a potentially vulnerable position in some jurisdictions. The UK government is very specific about this, and offers a way back by stating that former citizens can resume UK citizenship if they can show that they were required to make this statement of giving up UK citizenship in order to obtain another one. In times where the countries like the UK are tightening up on immigration and where expats seem to report surprise at not being able to get this or that when they think about returning, it makes sense to ensure that all the paperwork is in order. Why you keep talking about Thailand with respect to this point, is not clear. If you had made a legally binding statement of intent to give up original citizenship, you can completely legally be given an ultimatum; some countries might let you return, some might not. UN conventions on this only require that you have a citizenship, they don't dictate which one.

    I appreciate the anecdotal de facto arrangements people have, and they seem much the same as the sort of de facto arrangements people might have with respect to land ownership and employment, i.e.: that strictly speaking there are laws that preclude them as options, even if effectively those laws are rarely enforced.

    If any of that is confusing, please explain how, rather than answering a question that wasn't asked.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1F2i0rYMj8

    we are all figments of our own imagination.

  5. #130
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    The minister of the interior has the right to revoke Thai nationality of a naturalized citizen, but I've only ever heard of one instance. This is the worst case scenario. The letter of intent does not actually make you give up UK citizenship. The 2 Shiniwats have multiple citizenships. Abhisit had dual citizenship. There are thousands of Thais, many in senior govt. positions that have dual citizenship, do you really think they're going to change this law?
    I have heard of some getting questioned at airports by immigration officers but they really don't know the Nationality act, which is as old as me!

  6. #131
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    ^ have you thought about maybe changing your name to Somchai or Wombat?

  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    ^ have you thought about maybe changing your name to Somchai or Wombat?
    This is a serious thread, surely you can find some other one to fulfill your sad little life.

  8. #133
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    ^ have you thought about maybe changing your name to Somchai or Wombat?
    and fcuking off to thai visa where they take themselves very seriously

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    and fcuking off to thai visa where they take themselves very seriously
    What an apt name and avatar for a idiot troll with no life.

  10. #135
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    hey, i read on Thai visa the other day that a guy who has took Thai citizenship also has a Thai name now. I forget his username

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    hey, i read on Thai visa the other day that a guy who has took Thai citizenship also has a Thai name now. I forget his username
    I'm probably not changing mine -

    Yes, one gets the option.

  12. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChalkyDee View Post
    I'm probably not changing mine
    Change it to โชค and sell lottery tickets. With citizenship you now can.

  13. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Change it to โชค and sell lottery tickets. With citizenship you now can.

    Such a life...

  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Change it to โชค and sell lottery tickets. With citizenship you now can.
    lol

    No, I really don't see the point of changing it.

  15. #140
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    ^ I'd take Supaporn, Supachai or Supahonky

  16. #141
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    I’m sure you have your reasons Chalky, but quite why any sane person would want to go through the, clearly complex issue, of Thai citizenship is rather surprising.
    choosing to live in a poorly regulated military dictatorship smack of desperation or lunacy.
    Lets face it even when elections are allowed, the country will end up under military control, and the threat of martial law being invoked at the drop of a hat.

  17. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    I’m sure you have your reasons Chalky, but quite why any sane person would want to go through the, clearly complex issue, of Thai citizenship is rather surprising.
    choosing to live in a poorly regulated military dictatorship smack of desperation or lunacy.
    Lets face it even when elections are allowed, the country will end up under military control, and the threat of martial law being invoked at the drop of a hat.
    Becoming a citizen of a country you live in for a long time is quite a natural thing to do. My main reason is to buy land, start a business and not have to worry about visas in my old age, and now.
    I don't have to renounce my British one, so a win win situation.

  18. #143
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChalkyDee View Post
    not have to worry about visas in my old age, and now.
    I don't have to renounce my British one, so a win win situation.
    If you leave the country you still have to apply for a 're-entry visa' before you exit'. Don't you?

  19. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    If you leave the country you still have to apply for a 're-entry visa' before you exit'. Don't you?
    Of course not.

  20. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    If you leave the country you still have to apply for a 're-entry visa' before you exit'. Don't you?
    Quote Originally Posted by ChalkyDee View Post
    Of course not.
    The Residency Permit itself never expires, unless revoked. To be able to leave the country and return to Thailand, however, requires you to apply for a re-entry permit (endorsement).
    Thai Permanent Residency | ThaiEmbassy.com

    On top of that you still have to report to immigration every year and pay 1900 Baht. The same cost as a visa.

  21. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Thai Permanent Residency | ThaiEmbassy.com

    On top of that you still have to report to immigration every year and pay 1900 Baht. The same cost as a visa.
    This thread is about Thai Citizenship, not Permanent Residency, which is not worth it, IMHO. And actually with PR, you have to report to the police station every 5 years, not every year. You do need a re-entry permit for that.
    The only good thing about PR is that you can apply for Citizenship after 5 years with it.

  22. #147
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    ^
    I do apologise. I always seem to get the 2 mixed up.

  23. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChalkyDee View Post
    I'm probably not changing mine -

    Yes, one gets the option.
    When I was involved in the process several years ago it was still compulsory to change. You could pick any "Thai" first name but the Interior Ministry official gave five options on a family name. These were all based in some way on the farang family name.

    My first choice of Turdsak Fartinpool was summarily rejected.

  24. #149
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    I have one more hurdle to jump. I need my parent's names on the "tabien baan". For this I've sent my birth certificate to England to get legalised, then I will translate it and take it to the Ministry of foreign affairs then the amphur, then all set to go.
    Oh, the boss said it would help to be able to sing the national anthem and the royal song they play at the cinema. Should be easy enough.

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