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  1. #1
    I am in Jail

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    Teaching in UK after being in SEA

    I've done a fair stint of teaching in Thailand (2years) and Cambodia (1year) as well as other places and am now thinking of getting QTS through doing the long haul of, ideally, degree in Modern Languages and then a PGCE.

    Is anyone out there a current or ex UK school teacher who can advise on what the best way to go about doing this is - ie: is it worthwile to just do a general teaching degree (B.Ed) or is it better to have a specific subject etc?

    I may well have to do a couple of A-levels but can you get round this by doing an access course of some sort?

    I would be a mature student by the way and can't face the idea of 'temporary' employment in SEA (plus occasional periods of being a total loser back in UK) for ever.

  2. #2
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    One of my friends in the UK has just become a teacher after a few years in journalism, I'm not sure what course they did but there is a course in the UK at the moment to get mature students through the system quite quickly to fill the vocational gaps and they got paid to do the course. I know my friend has a degree so not sure of what qualifications you would need to get on the course. I hope this is of some use.

  3. #3
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    I teach in Thailand but would not even think about doing it in the West. I have school teacher friends in America and the children have far more "rights" than you do. Disciplinary problems usually involve teacher's union lawyers, school district lawyers and parents lawyers, and are a long running nightmare. The first time you say anything "politically incorrect" in the classroom, even if it is necessary to make a point, you are deliberately taken out of context and persecuted and the children have that charming western "me me me" attitude. Say what you want about Thailand, but they've got one thing right; when a child here gets into a spat here with a teacher, the child loses. Not that way at home. Think about it real well first and talk to some people who are there.

  4. #4
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    Not necessarily. I have taught in some really rough schools in Northern Califonia. My first assignment was at a Middle School south of SF. The staff and principals partied to gether. The Principals response to student threats was "you got a lawyer, we got a free lawyer, you don't really want to be embarrassed in public, do you." We had sst every Friday pm, we brought a troublesome student down to the office and all of his teachers nailed him/her to the wall. If they didn't show they were suspended. The named the school after the principal. He kept me on the job--many times I wanted to quit and he fixed the problem for me. A great man.

  5. #5
    I am in Jail

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    I know the political correctness issues back in the West are ridiculous but I'll just have to deal with that really - I found there was more than enough nonsense of a similar nature to deal with whilst teaching in SEA as well.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtone9317 View Post
    Not necessarily. I have taught in some really rough schools in Northern Califonia. My first assignment was at a Middle School south of SF. The staff and principals partied to gether. The Principals response to student threats was "you got a lawyer, we got a free lawyer, you don't really want to be embarrassed in public, do you." We had sst every Friday pm, we brought a troublesome student down to the office and all of his teachers nailed him/her to the wall. If they didn't show they were suspended. The named the school after the principal. He kept me on the job--many times I wanted to quit and he fixed the problem for me. A great man.

    You were lucky. School administrators with common sense and a sense of loyalty to their teachers seem to be rare anymore. Sounds like a great man.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobR View Post
    I teach in Thailand but would not even think about doing it in the West. I have school teacher friends in America and the children have far more "rights" than you do. Disciplinary problems usually involve teacher's union lawyers, school district lawyers and parents lawyers, and are a long running nightmare. The first time you say anything "politically incorrect" in the classroom, even if it is necessary to make a point, you are deliberately taken out of context and persecuted and the children have that charming western "me me me" attitude. Say what you want about Thailand, but they've got one thing right; when a child here gets into a spat here with a teacher, the child loses. Not that way at home. Think about it real well first and talk to some people who are there.
    So you like teaching only in a place where you can be sloppy and not have to try?

    Millions of westerners teach in the west. Only a few hundred or thousand westerners choose to teach in Thailand. That speaks volumes.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lesmiles View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by BobR View Post
    I teach in Thailand but would not even think about doing it in the West. I have school teacher friends in America and the children have far more "rights" than you do. Disciplinary problems usually involve teacher's union lawyers, school district lawyers and parents lawyers, and are a long running nightmare. The first time you say anything "politically incorrect" in the classroom, even if it is necessary to make a point, you are deliberately taken out of context and persecuted and the children have that charming western "me me me" attitude. Say what you want about Thailand, but they've got one thing right; when a child here gets into a spat here with a teacher, the child loses. Not that way at home. Think about it real well first and talk to some people who are there.
    So you like teaching only in a place where you can be sloppy and not have to try?

    Millions of westerners teach in the west. Only a few hundred or thousand westerners choose to teach in Thailand. That speaks volumes.
    What prompts someone to write a response this stupid? Are you a hateful troll and are you just a moron? Being deliberately taken out of context and having to deal with silly political correctness have nothing to do with being sloppy. You obviously know nothing about teaching.

  9. #9
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    the op is either dreaming or in lala land or a troll, gotta do ur A levels first then a degree then ur pgce, that's abt a decade for you

  10. #10
    Member elche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtone9317 View Post
    Not necessarily. I have taught in some really rough schools in Northern Califonia. My first assignment was at a Middle School south of SF. The staff and principals partied to gether. The Principals response to student threats was "you got a lawyer, we got a free lawyer, you don't really want to be embarrassed in public, do you." We had sst every Friday pm, we brought a troublesome student down to the office and all of his teachers nailed him/her to the wall. If they didn't show they were suspended. The named the school after the principal. He kept me on the job--many times I wanted to quit and he fixed the problem for me. A great man.
    This is not the reality of teaching in North America. The prinicipal, who you say is coming across as a hero, could have his teaching license lifted by the College of Teachers very easily for having said that to a parent or student.

    Today you and your principal are at the mercy of a new society where you are held accountable for anything and everything happening at school and off school. This can mean even having false charges brought against you. If you have been in teaching long enough, and I suspect you haven't, you will know what I am talking about. If not, it will eventually happen to you, trust me, and then you will sing a much different song. Be very careful what you say to the students or parents if you plan to be in this job for the long term. Kids and parents can be very malicious, and if they know about the college of teachers in your state, you and your principal could be fighting for your careers.

  11. #11
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    I've taught in the US, have family members in education, and have many friends who are teachers - not once have I heard of anyone complain about political correctness as a ongoing work issue. In other words, BS.

    Yeah, if you're a wingnut with a chip on your shoulder who views his/her students as a captive audience to which you can spew your opinions, then you've got problems. For the rest of us with a little common-sense professionalism, so-called political correctness is not an issue.

    The real issue for teachers everywhere is the ever-increasing workload and heaps of expectations that are heaped upon them. Nowadays a teacher is expected to be more like social worker than inspirational subject master.

  12. #12
    Member elche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bexar County Stud
    I've taught in the US, have family members in education, and have many friends who are teachers - not once have I heard of anyone complain about political correctness as a ongoing work issue. In other words, BS.
    Obviously you aren't informed about who and how teachers have been disciplined or have lost their jobs. Check with your on-line college of teacher's blue pages. Every month there is a long list of teachers who have come under the scrutiny of the C.O.T.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bexar County Stud
    Yeah, if you're a wingnut with a chip on your shoulder who views his/her students as a captive audience to which you can spew your opinions, then you've got problems. For the rest of us with a little common-sense professionalism, so-called political correctness is not an issue. The real issue for teachers everywhere is the ever-increasing workload and heaps of expectations that are heaped upon them. Nowadays a teacher is expected to be more like social worker than inspirational subject master.
    If you consider yourself one "with a little common-sense professionalism" why would you even complain about workload? Wouldn't you know how to handle it without complaining? I have no concerns about work load.

    Btw, your writing suggests to me that you are less than professional.

  13. #13
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly View Post
    the op is either dreaming or in lala land or a troll, gotta do ur A levels first then a degree then ur pgce, that's abt a decade for you
    Not meaning to get off topic, but what are A levels?

    Thanks in advance.

  14. #14
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    PGCE or GTP are the main routes to teaching in the UK. PGCE is quite stressful because it's basically a year of unpaid teaching assignments in schools that are chosen for you and you will get some "challenging" lessons full of crazy lil kids. The other route is a GTP which is paid but takes a few years to complete. It's not as stressful and those that I know that have gone this way have found it alot easier.
    "I live for myself and I answer to nobody."
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    thx all

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