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  1. #1
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    Happyman's Avatar
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    Is it the same in Thailand ?

    Warning over narcissistic pupils


    By Katherine Sellgren
    BBC News, at the ASCL conference


    Dr Craig said restricting criticism undermined learning

    The growing expectation placed on schools and parents to boost pupils' self-esteem is breeding a generation of narcissists, an expert has warned.
    Dr Carol Craig said children were being over-praised and were developing an "all about me" mentality.
    She said teachers increasingly faced complaints from parents if their child failed a spelling test or did not get a good part in the school pantomime.
    Schools needed to reclaim their role as educators, not psychologists, she said.
    Dr Craig, who is chief executive of the centre for confidence and well-being in Scotland, was speaking at the Association of School and College Leaders conference in Birmingham.
    Negative characteristic
    She told head teachers the self-esteem agenda, imported from the United States, was a "a big fashionable idea" that had gone too far.
    She said an obsession with boosting children's self-esteem was encouraging a narcissistic generation who focussed on themselves and felt "entitled".

    They (schools) are not surrogate psychologists or mental health professionals


    Dr Carol Craig

    "Narcissists make terrible relationship partners, parents and employees. It's not a positive characteristic. We are in danger of encouraging this," she said.
    "And we are kidding ourselves if we think that we aren't going to undermine learning if we restrict criticism.
    "Parents no longer want to hear if their children have done anything wrong. This is the downside of the self-esteem agenda.
    "I'm not saying it's of no value… but you get unintentional consequences."
    Parental responsibility
    Since 2007, there has been a statutory responsibility on schools in England to improve pupils' well-being and primary and secondary schools are increasingly teaching social and emotional skills.
    Indeed it is possible that Ofsted inspectors will soon appraise schools' performance in this area; and well-being could be one of the measures used in the school report card system that the government wants to introduce.
    But Dr Craig told head teachers that this was not the role of schools.
    "Schools have to hold out that they are educational establishments," she said.
    "They are not surrogate psychologists or mental health professionals."
    Learning about feelings from a professional in a classroom did not send out a positive message, she added.
    And she warned there was a danger the more schools taught emotional well-being, the less parents would take responsibility.
    "We run the risk of undermining the family as the principle agent of sociability," she said.

  2. #2
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    withnallstoke's Avatar
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    Have to remember that the people who write this shite write it because they have to. It would be usefull if the age of Dr Craig was known, what schools she has taught in and for how long. Of course it's nice to be praised. It's also usefull to be told when you just aint cuttin' it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Happyman
    But Dr Craig told head teachers that this was not the role of schools.
    She told the schools!
    Have you got a link to this Happyman?

  3. #3
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    Only this from BBC
    BBC NEWS | UK | Education | Warning over narcissistic pupils

    Which is the post above

  4. #4
    Gohills flip-flops wearer
    withnallstoke's Avatar
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    Centre for Confidence and Well-being
    Nutter. Some jock with a sliced fried potato on her shoulder.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happyman
    Is it the same in Thailand ?
    absolutely.

  6. #6
    Dan
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    Not where I live/amongst students I see but I'm sure it happens. I did read a report a while back about China which said something similar was happening there - the growing wealth was being concentrated on the single child within the family with the consequence that a nation of spoilt brats, saddled with an extraordinary sense of entitlement, was growing up. The Communist Party was, the report said, so worried by this, that they were turning to traditional religious beliefs to try to counter it.

  7. #7
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    The Labour party got rid of Grammar schools and invented the Comprehensive school and they have tinkered with the curriculum ever since.
    Interestingly, Northern Ireland kept their Secondary Moderns and Grammer schools, also focusing on the three R's.
    Their pupils consistently score the best results in the UK.

  8. #8
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    Alon with the few remaining grammar schools on the mainland....

  9. #9
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    I agree with Dr. Craig, in that it is not up to the school to teach social and emotional well-being. In my experience, teaching in the U.K, and in Canada, I'd say that we have no choice. In reality, there are many children in poorer areas, that come to school with no lunch, or winter clothes. If we don't support that child, then what good are we?

    I also think that we are there to criticise in a constructive way. Parent's don't like to hear anything negative about their children, and sometimes seem to have more pull on school matters, than the teacher themselves.

    I just don't see how OFSTED could appraise schools' performance in this area. Every school is different. Another brilliant idea from OFSTED to implement more standards.

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