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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    see above.
    i looked,


    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    My MA is a double major - Ethics and Law BA - Social Work, with a sub-majors in English Literature, philosophy, sociology, politics, citizenship sub-majors.
    that's nice, i still do not see any sign of an education degree, dip ed or PGCSE


    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    At the end of November this year, I'll be fully qualified in Australia to teach English/Literature, Social Science and Legal Studies at secondary school level.
    how? really.

    I dont see any evidence of an educational qualification.

    That's what we look for. as first hurdle.

  2. #27
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    mate, I aint having a go at you, I'm serious,

    Have the CELTA people told you that it is good for teaching in all of AUstralia?

    good luck, I dont think it is.

    eg: in the state of victoria

    1. To gain registration with the Institute, an applicant will need to possess:
    • Four years of approved tertiary study, including an approved course of primary or secondary teacher education, or
    • An approved Certificate of Proficiency/Completion in a trade together with:
      - relevant industrial experience such that the period of apprenticeship and the industrial experience totals not less than eight years; and
      - an approved trade technician course or an approved equivalent program of post-apprenticeship studies; and
      - an approved course of teacher education (which may include ii), or
    • An approved Certificate of Technology, together with a minimum of six years of approved industrial experience and an approved course of secondary teacher education.
    2. If the applicant does not meet the requirements of 1. above, but does have an approved course of primary or secondary teacher education, then in limited and extraordinary circumstances the Institute may register the applicant as a teacher.
    3. Under the terms of the Mutual Recognition (Victoria) Act 1998 and the Trans Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997, the Institute is required to register a person who is registered to practise as a teacher in any other participating State or Territory or in New Zealand.
    For more information, go to I am Already Registered in Another Australian State or Territory, or New Zealand

    Int. Schools look that you already have a qualification for teaching in your home country first, and prefer 3-5 years of experience also.

  3. #28
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    Okay, and this is only because your experience appears as if it'll be extremely helpful to me.

    To be fully qualified to teach, as I understand it, one requires recognition by the local education department.

    As of the end of November this year, I will have completed my Diploma in Education (Secondary) and will be accredited to teach English/Literature, Social Science and Legal Studies in government and non-government schools throughout Australia.

    The Dip Ed is a universally recognised teacher qualification.

    This accredition is recognised by International Schools throughout Thailand and Asia generally.

    My bachelor of social work was four-year full-time degree.

    My main query relates to newly graduated, fully accredited to teach, but inexperienced, gaining employment in Thailand's international schools.


    For goddess' sake, please let this be enough.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    As of the end of November this year, I will have completed my Diploma in Education (Secondary)
    thank-you, why didnt you say so in the first, or the second place.

    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    and will be accredited to teach
    this is not the same, many many unqualified people use this term, since not all countries, or even states have the same rules/regulations for accreditation to teach, I've heard many people use this phrase as a way of avoiding mentioning the fact that they DO NOT HAVE AN EDUCATION QUALIFCATION, and bleat on abnout how many degrees, in law and business they have and how that their years of experience in business is worth far more than any peice of paper (meaning an education degree that that do not have)

    now that you've told us you'll have a Dip Ed, we know that it does not pertain to you.

    Wasn't so hard, was it?

    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    The Dip Ed is a universally recognised teacher qualification.
    Yes, it is. you never mentioned the Dip Ed. before but now that you have I can tell you that you are as good as gold to teach in pretty much any international school around the world now.


    Quote Originally Posted by insideleft
    My main query relates to newly graduated, fully accredited to teach, but inexperienced, gaining employment in Thailand's international schools.
    The general rule is that you need 2-5 years experience first. BUT many, well a few, have been able to gain employement at even the top international schools in Bangkok, ISB, BPS and NIST.

    Most of the schools are looking for teachers for August right now, so no real point sending them resumes for after that. Most schools, do not hire from resumes sent in, but prefer (I saw prefer so the odd person can say but my friends, friend George Smith got into such and such blah blah exceptions) but most schools prefer to deal with a couple of large recruitment agencies. Search Associates, Council International Schools, International School Search, so get your name onto one of them.

    In fact, you may even wish to start that process now, since it can take six months, they all have deadlines towards the end of this year, for jobs starting NEXT AUGUST!

    a smaller, and cheaper alternative is to buy the Times Education Supplement or sign up for Teacher Recruitment International - a smaller Australian based company. www.triaust.com

    FWIW - I have no affiliation or connection with any of these agencies so recommend honestly them as a previous customer.

  5. #30
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    Thanks KW,

    Since reading this thread, I am in touch with several of the agencies you mentioned.

    I understand your need for clarity, I often fall for the trap of thinking that the way I understand what I say is universally understood.

    Thanks for your persistance.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly
    Quote: Originally Posted by durianfan One headmaster told me that he couldn't hire me because I didn't have any experience teaching IB classes. Quite true. Until he has a vacancy in that position, no other reliable looking candidate .... suddenly he can hire you. In fact, I do know of a young female teacher who got a job in one of the top 3 international schools in Bangkok first year out of teaching.... sometimes it is just good timing.
    Yes Kingwilly; she landed a job at NIST and started on $51,000 a year plus a housing allowance and the other usual benefits.

  7. #32
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    Erm, quite probable, what's your point?

  8. #33
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    The point is that even an inexperienced teacher can get a job at a prime International school with luck. What is your point?

  9. #34
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    i have joined up with search associates, am keeping my eye on TES and i am also keeping my eye on the individual school websites as I have read on ISR that a lot of schools are starting to do Skype interviews and so filling places much earlier. To this end do you think it would be wise to send off my CV in the next couple of weeks to schools that interest me so that if a position comes up they can look at my qualifications or do you think just sending a CV on the off chance would annoy them and make them NOT look at me for being an opportunist?
    My CV is ready to go, my cover letter needs work. Anybody got any idea what to put in a good cover letter when you have minimal teaching experience, PGCE and 1 year?

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doggsy
    To this end do you think it would be wise to send off my CV in the next couple of weeks to schools that interest me so that if a position comes up they can look at my qualifications or do you think just sending a CV on the off chance would annoy them and make them NOT look at me for being an opportunist?
    doesnt hurt. but most schools do not require their teachers to resign until Dec/Jan therefore I do not think most jobs will be filled before then.

    Quote Originally Posted by Doggsy
    My CV is ready to go, my cover letter needs work. Anybody got any idea what to put in a good cover letter when you have minimal teaching experience, PGCE and 1 year?
    Be truthful and upfront, nothing worse than reading a cover letter and resume and needing to spend time guessing what the applicant details and experience is.

    write a cover letter saying why you want to teach, why you want to teach overseas, detail relevant life experience you may have, explain your future teaching career plans if relevant.

    google it, I'm sure there is thousands of good websites out there.

    Cover Letters - Format

  11. #36
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    May be of some help or use...


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  12. #37
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    KW - thanks for all your posts here; not for myself but brother who's looking to move here after 6yrs teaching in China, found it v useful.cheers!

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly View Post

    Life overseas. Schools with first class facilities. Dedicated and polite students. A salary and lifestyle that allows you to put some money in the bank every month. An opportunity to expand your professional and personal horizons. New experiences waiting for you every day.


    Does this sound like something that you want? If it is........
    ....too bad you only have a bloody TEFL cert.

    (sorry, couldn't resist)

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly
    doesnt hurt. but most schools do not require their teachers to resign until Dec/Jan therefore I do not think most jobs will be filled before then.
    Update.

    I know of at least 2 or 3 teachers who have already been signed on for jobs starting next August, it seems many schools are now doing interviews via skype or face to face well before the job fairs.

    Best to be ready.

  15. #40
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    kingwilly has hit the nail on the head.

    Reality says that there is more international schools now more than ever. However, only a few are truly international schools.

    Can you land a job in one of these true international schools? Yes, you can. But your ducks better be in a row. The competition is tough.

    Personally, I have seen many Brits and Yanks with top credentials turned down. Sometimes, it is just the luck of the draw.

  16. #41
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    i'm still waiting for a position to become available in my subject so that I can apply for it. With only one year of experience teaching I am hoping previous time spent in Thailand and the risk of me getting culture shock and therefore breaking a contract working in my favour

  17. #42
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    Much less chance if you are only looking for a job in one particular country. Better to look for jobs in several countries unless you really have to work in Thailand only. For many schools they actually prefer you not to have experience in Thailand, since you might be a (excuse the slur everyone) scummy ex TEFLr and/or sexpat. Seriously! Also watch out for local hire conditions as opposed to overseas hire, even if you have to fly to Singapore for the first interview. What is your subject area and level? I might be able to help you find a job in Indonesia, if you want.

  18. #43
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    Definitely the most clear posts I've read on this topic. I've been searching around the net for months and have been getting more and more confused until I found this site! As it happens, I have a plan I wanted to run past you to get your invaluable advice:

    Brief background: I've lived in Thailand for 15 years and am married to a Thai, with a 3 year old child. I have worked in the media industry during those 15 years but hours are long and money becoming unstable due to the recession, no holidays and work permits are getting harder to renew. I'd prefer my child to go (when around 5 years old) to an International school in Bangkok but the high fees along with fact I will have to work like a dog to cover them has led me to an idea... to become a qualified teacher and work at a good International School. Obviously the incentive is to have my child's fees covered whilst getting a goodish income, synced holidays and keeping the family together.

    In terms of qualifications, I have an 2.1 International Law degree and a TESOL both from the UK. I'd taught as part of the TESOL training in Europe and additionally for around 6 months in Thailand - however that was 15 years ago and I haven't touched teaching since.

    My plan:

    1. To get some voluntary teaching assistant/ support work at one of the International Schools/ Nurseries for a month or so to be able to use that recommendation for a PGCE application.
    2. To return to the UK for 1 year to do a full-time PGCE - Primary. The family are able to accompany me during that time and we have a place to stay. However I am not sure of the best courses yet, would just like somewhere in London that is nearby to travel to. Any recommendations are welcome.
    3. Whilst in the UK, sign up with a teaching recruitment agency (as per your recommendation, probably Search. Or should I sign up to this before I go to the UK? Or is there no point joining these until the PGCE is obtained?)
    4. Go to one of the Recruitment fairs in London as an overseas teacher applying for a position in Asia, obviously aiming for Bangkok (Again, would anyone even bother to talk to me if I had't actually finished the PGCE?)
    5. In an ideal world, apply for a job and get an international school placement in Bangkok straight off achieving the PGCE...(Is this totally unrealistic? To help my case would it make sense to have longer experience at a Bangkok International school before going to the UK, or is the fact I have links to Bangkok at all 'Bad' in terms of being employed as an 'fresh, overseas hire'?)
    6. If no job offer and it takes too long to apply from London, return to Bangkok and apply from there and, last case, take a local hire job (if discount of fees is available - I heard local hire normally don't get full fees paid, but may be offered a discount which is still better than nothing).

    Do you think this sounds like a plan? Any advice or suggestions, especially in terms of timeline would be fantastic. It's a huge change of career for me along with the financial down payment for the PGCE etc, so it would be great to know that I have a fighting chance of this working before making the commitment. Thanks in advance!

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppyrabbit
    5. In an ideal world, apply for a job and get an international school placement in Bangkok straight off achieving the PGCE...(Is this totally unrealistic? To help my case would it make sense to have longer experience at a Bangkok International school before going to the UK, or is the fact I have links to Bangkok at all 'Bad' in terms of being employed as an 'fresh, overseas hire'?) 6. If no job offer and it takes too long to apply from London, return to Bangkok and apply from there and, last case, take a local hire job (if discount of fees is available - I heard local hire normally don't get full fees paid, but may be offered a discount which is still better than nothing).
    its a good plan, but after you complete the pgce you need several years of work experience before you have a decent chance of being selected by an upper tier school.
    The "real" teachers are just that qualified hard working individuals that regard their jobs highly. Most of the teachers at my daughters school are fantastic hard working and very very committed.
    I dont think your plan would work for the following British schools here. Harrow, Bangkok Patana, or Shrewsbury. Maybe with the lower tier but I doubt it. Sadly just no teaching experience, and no experience teaching abroad.

  20. #45
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    Good plan, it also depends on your age, if you're 35-40 then worth spending 5 years or so getting there. If you're 55 or so, you'll struggle to get a job and it may not be financially worth it.

    1. Not many schools I know will take a stranger as a volunteer. It may also be a violation or your work permit/visa arrangements. But then again a small school out in the country would say yes, and equally a small local school in Bangkok may say yes.

    2. Sorry, I don't know.

    3.No point until you are qualified. At least with the big ones like search etc. However things have changed... hundreds more agencies around, try linkedin try teacher horizons etc etc. But smaller agency equals smaller schools. But could be a good foot into the door so to speak because as AO mentioned above the big schools wont take you without experience, especially because you're based in Thailand.

    (That statement is not to disparage all teachers in Thailand, some are hard working individuals, but many are less than desirable, particularly the ones who have just done what you plan. Recruiters and principals are not stupid, they know many people in Thailand only teach to stay in Thailand, sometimes it is easier to just ignore all local hires and hire experienced qualified teachers from abroad.)

    5. Optimistic, not realistic, however, sometimes you can get lucky and it's a case of right place right time.

    6. Bad idea. Some dont even offer free schooling. Many only offer discounted and usually max of 2 kids. Better to stay in England for a few years and cut your teeth on some real teaching before trying to get a job in Thailand. (Also a requirement to get QTS as far as I know).

    Good luck.

  21. #46
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    Oh and the iPGCE....nope.

  22. #47
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    Hi all hope you don't mind but i posted this on another topic. Is there any chance that i could have some advice on my teaching aspirations in Thailand; Here goes,

    I've been teaching English language and grammar at the weekends and one night a week at a community based place for foreign nationals here in the UK. beginner to intermediate/Intermediate to advanced (Grammar )

    Im seriously thinking of doing a bit of teaching back in LOS this winter. Ive got a degree B.A (Hons) in Social Anthropology and also did a one day a week for 2yrs course as part of my degree in Teaching English to foreign learners. I looked into the CELTA over here in the uk but it was pretty much the same as i did in uni.
    Does anyone have any opinions to whether the experience i have to be useful in gaining a position in LOS?
    Thanks in advance.

  23. #48
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    A big international school wont touch you. One of the smaller thai "international" schools or a local school with an English or International programme will pick you up quickly.

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