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  1. #2851
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    How is the ACA to blame? Seems more like a market issue to me.
    The companies weren't making money on the plans because of all the essential coverage stuff. Agree or disagree with whether it should be there, bottom line is we started out with like 9 carriers the first year, then like 6 the next year, until this year we were left with one monopoly and coverage costs more than doubled one year to the next.

    I had to switch carriers every year because every time the company I was with either went out of business or stopped selling marketplace plans. It is an ACA issue due to the way the plans are required to be structured and what they are required to cover

    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    I posted a few days back that that could be easily fixed by requiring insurers to provide coverage statewide or not at all.
    I agree, but this wouldn't fix the issue of the plans not being profitable without massive premiums

  2. #2852
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    One major fix they can offer is to allow these companies to sell catastrophic plans to people who just want basic coverage. Then people would be able to at least have emergency coverage in case of serious illness or accident

  3. #2853
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    You miss the point as in I'm just trying to her some sort of comparison for what you pay in tax and what you get I'm not asking for your personal income. So let's say for example someone to keep the maths easy earns $36k a year as in 3k a month how much of that 3k a month does he take home after taxes as in before he has to pay health insurance.
    You have options: https://consumer.websales.floridablu...461.1501282821

    About the link above. You might not be able to open it outside the US. I had to change my IP address to use/open it.




    I am showing you two different people,……..

    For me (60/male/non-smoker/residing in Dade County – Miami):


    This is what Florida Blue would offer my daughter (30/female/non-smoker/residing in Tampa, Florida). She would not be offered any subsidy (she makes over 100,000/year). Anyway she receives her insurance through her employer:


    You can get quotes from other insurance companies in Florida (maybe get better prices/coverage?). I just used Florida Blue as an example because I’ve been using them for years.
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  4. #2854
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhaze
    but this wouldn't fix the issue of the plans not being profitable without massive premiums
    I am highly suspicious of these health companies claims. Most are raking in record profits while still raising rates. This is the horseshit they are pulling in my state;

    Health insurers seek double-digit rate increases in Washington state — despite billion-dollar reserves



    Health insurers seek double-digit rate increases in Washington state ? despite billion-dollar reserves | The Seattle Times

  5. #2855
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    I am highly suspicious of these health companies claims. Most are raking in record profits while still raising rates.
    I agree that they can't be trusted, but they also don't stop doing things that are making them money for no reason either. If they were making money on these plans they would have continued selling them

    The plans that I was on and always tried to be on weren't big companies either, they were locally based co-ops that just couldn't survive on reasonable premiums. Almost none of these guys are around anymore, and that has been a major failure as they were supposed to provide competition for the big slimy insurers.

    There is probably a bigger issue here involving how expensive healthcare costs are in general that goes way beyond Obamacare, but these rates skyrocketed astronomically in short order following ACA implementation. Some states got hit harder than others

  6. #2856
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhaze
    There is probably a bigger issue here involving how expensive healthcare costs are in general that goes way beyond Obamacare, but these rates skyrocketed astronomically in short order following ACA implementation.
    This is undoubtedly true. They were going up before the ACA was around and they will go up if it is gone. One thing is true repealing the ACA is not going to magically make insurance cheap again in fact the opposite is true.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/robbman.../#11c635e83a01

  7. #2857
    Thailand Expat raycarey's Avatar
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    a closer look at mccain's dramatic vote...the video's only about a minute long...


  8. #2858
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by redhaze
    but this wouldn't fix the issue of the plans not being profitable without massive premiums
    I am highly suspicious of these health companies claims. Most are raking in record profits while still raising rates. This is the horseshit they are pulling in my state;

    Health insurers seek double-digit rate increases in Washington state — despite billion-dollar reserves



    Health insurers seek double-digit rate increases in Washington state ? despite billion-dollar reserves | The Seattle Times
    Ridiculous.

    US health care is a disgraceful sham.

  9. #2859
    Head Skivvie Stacker Storekeeper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    So how much are all you Americans who actually live in America having to pay for your health insurance or is it a secret how much you actually pay? I keep seeing these obamacare discussions but no one seems to say what they are paying now and say 2, 3, 5, 10 years ago. We pay in the UK through are tax and national insurance contributions. Income tax at 20% on what you earn over £11k no tax on your first £11k and national insurance at 11% on what you earn over £7.5k and free for everyone.
    $555 a year enrollment fee for TRICARE Prime with an annual $3000 a year catastrophic cap.

    0r

    $0 a year for TRICARE Standard with a $300 annual deductible. (Can use this one in Thailand but requires payment up front and submit the claims myself for reimbursement).

  10. #2860
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    Quote Originally Posted by Storekeeper View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    So how much are all you Americans who actually live in America having to pay for your health insurance or is it a secret how much you actually pay? I keep seeing these obamacare discussions but no one seems to say what they are paying now and say 2, 3, 5, 10 years ago. We pay in the UK through are tax and national insurance contributions. Income tax at 20% on what you earn over £11k no tax on your first £11k and national insurance at 11% on what you earn over £7.5k and free for everyone.
    $555 a year enrollment fee for TRICARE Prime with an annual $3000 a year catastrophic cap.

    0r

    $0 a year for TRICARE Standard with a $300 annual deductible. (Can use this one in Thailand but requires payment up front and submit the claims myself).
    Understandably,

    Tricare is for retired military folks.

    Different ball-game for civilians.

    I don't know the details of the plans.

    It sounds like you think it is good.

    Is Tricare a form of 'single payer' program.

  11. #2861
    Head Skivvie Stacker Storekeeper's Avatar
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    ^ IMHO .... TRICARE is exactly the sort of health care program we should all have in the USA. You shouldn't have to serve in the military.

  12. #2862
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    Quote Originally Posted by Storekeeper View Post
    ^ IMHO .... TRICARE is exactly the sort of health care program we should all have in the USA. You shouldn't have to serve in the military.
    Yes, I recall you noting this previously.

    I'll look further into it out of curiosity.

    An old alumn of mine who did 20 years in the Navy and retired and went to PSNS told me (a couple of yeaRs ago) they cut or change Tricare and he was disappointed about that.


  13. #2863
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    ^ I have no idea what he's talking about. Of course the enrollment fees have went up a bit over the years. Maybe what he's talking about is TRICARE For Life for those 65 and over. No cost, but now I guess MEDICARE is primary and TRICARE secondary. There is an going discussion about this in a FB group I'm in and almost nobody drops their TRICARE for any company sponsored programs or the exchanges.

    IMHO congress could use TRICARE as the baseline starting point and tweak it to fit the civilian world.

  14. #2864
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Finally. Bernie is in a good position to push Democrats for single payer healthcare.

    IMO, single payer is the only way to go.


    Sanders 'litmus test' alarms Democrats

    Bernie Sanders' single-payer plan sparks fears of primary election challenges

    House and Senate Democrats have wondered for months if Bernie Sanders’ supporters might choose to focus their energy on launching primary challenges to party moderates in 2018. They’re about to get an answer.

    Sanders has decided the moment is right to launch his proposal for the single-payer health insurance system that helped form the backbone of his presidential message. And Democrats who don’t get behind it could find themselves on the wrong side of the most energetic wing of the party — as well as the once and possibly future presidential candidate who serves as its figurehead.

    The Vermont senator himself has not explicitly said he’ll support primary challenges to those who won’t support his push for a so-called Medicare-for-all health care plan. But there are plenty of signs that Sanders and his allies view the issue as a defining moment for Democratic lawmakers.

    “Our view is that within the Democratic Party, this is fast-emerging as a litmus test,” said Ben Tulchin, the pollster for Sanders’ White House run.


    The single-payer concept is increasingly popular in the party — high-profile senators like Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand and Kamala Harris have expressed some support, and, for the first time, a majority of House Democrats have now signed on to the single-payer bill that Rep. John Conyers has been introducing regularly for more than a decade.

    But even as leading party figures have drifted toward supporting a single-payer system similar to the one proposed by Sanders, almost none of them expect anything like it to become law while Republicans control Washington.

    With Sanders promising to play a major role in 2018 races, that’s led many party officials to worry about the prospect of his involvement in primaries that could upend the Democratic establishment’s plans to win crucial House, Senate and gubernatorial seats.

    The fears are acute enough that when the Nevada chapter of Our Revolution — the political group spawned from the Sanders presidential campaign — endorsed long-shot candidate Jesse Sbaih in the state’s Democratic Senate primary over party favorite Rep. Jacky Rosen, retired former Sen. Harry Reid felt the need to call Sanders directly.

    Don’t endorse Sbaih, and don’t let the national Our Revolution group accept its Nevada chapter's recommendation to back him either, the former minority leader implored his friend. Sanders agreed, said a Democrat familiar with the interaction.

    “There’s a concern that [Sanders allied] people will try to make a stir,” said a senior Democratic aide working on a 2018 campaign. “You can’t just be a liberal Democrat in a lot of these states and be elected. [So] the question is how we improve the lives of people instead of playing these political games."

    Sanders allies don’t find that argument convincing.

    “Any Democrat worth their salt that doesn’t unequivocally say Medicare-for-all is the way to go? To me, there’s something wrong with them,” said former Ohio state Sen. Nina Turner, president of Our Revolution. “We’re not going to accept no more hemming and hawing. No more game playing. Make your stand.”

    Sanders himself has stood alongside Democrats in fights like the recent one against the GOP’s health care plans. He’s toured states with wavering Republican senators to pressure them on the issue and quickly condemned a recent single-payer measure pushed by Republican Sen. Steve Daines as a ploy designed to trick Democrats.

    His team has been working with fellow progressive senators to enlist co-sponsors for his measure, said Democrats across Capitol Hill. Within Sanders circles, the increased popularity of single-payer arrangements is seen as a sign that his long-promised "political revolution” is underway.

    “He’s been vindicated by the presidential campaign,” said Mark Longabaugh, a senior Sanders 2016 campaign adviser.

    The Vermont senator has signaled that he expects serious resistance even from Democrats, but he has yet to spell out how he'll fight back.

    “We will be taking on the most powerful special interests in the country: Wall Street, the insurance companies, the drug companies, the corporate media, the Republican Party and the establishment wing of the Democratic Party,” he emailed supporters last Tuesday.

    What’s clear is that Sanders’ large and politically active following has stopped Democrats from confronting him directly — including when it comes to offering alternatives to his Medicare-for-all measure. Many still remember the swift and angry January response from grass-roots progressives including Sanders supporters toward Booker for a symbolic drug importation vote, and toward Sen. Elizabeth Warren for her procedural vote in favor of Ben Carson’s nomination as Housing secretary.

    “It represents the broader question of what the Democratic Party stands for, [so] this is a fundamental moment for Democratic senators. It’s an issue that everyone is going to be watching to see how they respond,” said Chuck Idelson, a senior operative for the National Nurses United union, which served as one of the most prominent backers of Sanders’ campaign and has long been a needle in the side of establishment Democrats.

    Like many Democrats who are closely aligned with Sanders’ political operation, Idelson stopped short of primary threats. But he refused to rule out the possibility that his group might consider backing challenges of sitting Democratic lawmakers who don’t back the plan.

    “Our organization, and plenty of other people out there, are going to be holding the Democrats accountable,” Idelson said. “What are we electing people for if they’re not going to be fighting for getting people health care when they need it?”

    Other Sanders-allied progressives have been equally adamant on the need to give his Medicare-for-all push a starring role in forthcoming primaries after the recent Capitol Hill health care fights and the stalling of a much-publicized California state legislative proposal.

    “We should run on Medicare-for-all in the 2018 and 2020 elections,” said Bay Area Congressman Ro Khanna, a Sanders backer who has encouraged primary challenges. “The Democrats that are activists are there, the Democratic voters are there, but now we just need enough of the elected officials to listen to where their constituents are.”

    The distrust between Sanders forces and the establishment is increasing the tension. Some Democratic senators privately bristled at the health care rallies that Sanders and others organized across the country in January: They were shocked to be greeted by angry Sanders backers in the crowds who loudly urged them to back a single-payer plan, according to several Democratic senators and aides. There is also longstanding grumbling over his refusal to share his campaign email list with other Democrats and, more recently, over his vote against a new round of sanctions against Russia and Iran.

    On the other side of the divide, Sanders allies insist the party seldom acknowledges the role of the senator’s 2016 presidential bid in shaping the party’s new agenda, whether on health care, a $15 minimum wage, or free college. And they express frustration that Democratic gatekeepers are still slow to accept Sanders’ likely front-runner role if he chooses to run for president in 2020.

    In the words of one senior aide to Sanders’ campaign, “A special cloud of denial formed over the swamp when polls started coming out showing Bernie was the most popular politician in the country."


    Sanders 'litmus test' alarms Democrats - POLITICO

  15. #2865
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    Good primary all of them. It certainly worked for Republicans. Career politicians are scared shitless, and should be. Fuck all of them. Primary every last one of their dumb asses until they get the picture. It won't taje long

  16. #2866
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ObamaCare gets a shot in the arm from insurers.

    Every county in US set to have an ObamaCare option

    Every county in the U.S. will have at least one ObamaCare insurer on the exchanges next year after CareSource announced Thursday it would fill the last remaining “bare” county in Ohio.

    It’s an important political win for advocates of ObamaCare who argue the exchanges are functioning in spite of efforts by the Trump administration to let it implode.

    “Trump and Republicans in Congress have been rooting for healthcare to fail. With today's announcement, their talking points continued to evaporate,” Protect Our Care Campaign Director Leslie Dach said in a statement Thursday.

    more http://teakdoor.com/speakers-corner/...asses-115.html (Health Care Passes)

  17. #2867
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    Having one provider is not what I would define as "working". That's what my county has, and premiums skyrocketed over 100% from this year compared to last.

    That's what happens in monopolies. No competition and no choice in a system where you are compelled to buy a product from a private corporation.

  18. #2868
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhaze
    That's what happens in monopolies. No competition and no choice in a system where you are compelled to buy a product from a private corporation.
    It is pervasive in far more industries than just healthcare in the US. That is the problem when you have a mostly unregulated capitalist oligarchy/corporatocracy.

    The thing is that you could easily fix that problem by requiring insurance companies to provide coverage statewide or not at all. Republicans though would rather let Americans suffer than to fix the problems with the ACA.

  19. #2869
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    It is pervasive in far more industries than just healthcare in the US.
    None that you are forced to buy a product from or pay a healthy fine, not that I am aware of anyway.

    Closest thing is drivers insurance, but that is totally different. And technically you don't have to drive

    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    The thing is that you could easily fix that problem by requiring insurance companies to provide coverage statewide or not at all. Republicans though would rather let Americans suffer than to fix the problems with the ACA.
    It wouldn't fix it but it would help. Totally conceivable that smaller states could still end up with one carrier.

  20. #2870
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    Got teeth? Let's make our teeth great again.

    Many Yanks too broke for a trip to the dentist.


    By Steven Reinberg HealthDay September 7, 2017, 1:59 PM
    Can't afford the dentist? You're not alone


    istockphoto

    Nobody loves a trip to the dentist, but for many middle-aged Americans even basic dental care is now financially out of reach, a new poll finds.


    In fact, 28 percent don't have dental insurance, while 56 percent don't get dental care except for serious dental problems, researchers said.


    Even more troubling is that 51 percent of people surveyed said they didn't know how they will get dental insurance after they turn 65, said lead researcher Erica Solway. She's a senior project manager at the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.


    According to the poll, 40 percent said they don't get regular cleanings or other preventive care, Solway said.

    "For the majority of folks, cost was the main barrier to dental care," she said.


    Solway noted that dental clinics or dental schools often provide care at lower costs or with a sliding scale based on income.


    "There are options for people who can't afford getting care from a traditional dentist's office," she said.


    Regular checkups and cleanings may be the best way to prevent serious tooth or gum problems, Solway said. "Most dental problems can be prevented by getting regular preventive care."


    Poor dental care also affects quality of life, Solway said. One in three of those surveyed between the ages of 50 and 64 said they were embarrassed by the condition of their teeth.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/cant-af...ure-not-alone/

  21. #2871
    I am not in Jail AntRobertson's Avatar
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    I don't know if anyone has been following this but I'm a Kimmel fan so just stumbled across it.

    Anyways apparently he recently called out Sen. Bill Cassidy who had been a guest on his show and accused him of lying to his face about the Cassidy-Graham Bill that the GOP are trying to ram down peoples throats now.

    His reaction is quite funny but you can see that there's some genuine anger behind it also and he completely savages Fox & Friends Brian Kilmeade ("Brian Kilmeade is a phony little creep"):


    https://youtu.be/wB5Hek7Z2b8

  22. #2872
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    ^ Yes it is big news right now and was all over CNN today. They are trying to push another nasty bill through again. It is going to be another razor close vote in the Senate. Sure hope it fails.

  23. #2873
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    all over CNN today
    hehe

    .

  24. #2874
    I am not in Jail AntRobertson's Avatar
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    That 'comment' speaks volumes and rather ironically says a lot.

  25. #2875
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    That 'comment' speaks volumes and rather ironically says a lot.
    He's is a trumpanzee to be expected.

    With regards to the bill it is it is a sham it proposes to replace the ACA with block grants directly to states. Those block grants continue to shrink every year until 2026 at which time they disappear completely basically leaving the nation once again without any healthcare program at all. Epic fail!

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