Page 4 of 35 FirstFirst 12345678910111214 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 852
  1. #76
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:12 AM
    Posts
    5,293
    their silly politicians are now trying to call it "extortion", so they can flee from their commitment, the cunning little fucks

    it's their fooking dues FFS,

    Brexit: UK 'must not allow itself to be blackmailed'
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41119870

  2. #77
    Hiso member
    buriramboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,671
    They were commitments based on us being in the EU, we're leaving so the EU will no longer be able to waste our money, enjoy making up the shortfall.

  3. #78
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:12 AM
    Posts
    5,293
    that's the cheap Chav version of events,

    in the real world, you pay your commitment

    if you leave a bank and owe them money, does this mean you should stop paying back ?

    of course not, only a chav would think like that

  4. #79
    Hiso member
    buriramboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,671
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    that's the cheap Chav version of events,

    in the real world, you pay your commitment

    if you leave a bank and owe them money, does this mean you should stop paying back ?

    of course not, only a chav would think like that
    Talking about banks, I believe the EU investment bank owes us quite a bit of money too, but no doubt you dirty untrustworthy continentals will try and wriggle out of paying what we are due.

  5. #80
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:12 AM
    Posts
    5,293
    at the end of the day, you are going to pay the full price, no matter how much you squeal

  6. #81
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:12 AM
    Posts
    5,293
    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy
    the EU investment bank owes us quite a bit of money too, but no doubt you dirty untrustworthy continentals will try and wriggle out of paying what we are due.
    of course not, at least we have collateral if you default on your EU membership fees

  7. #82
    Thailand Expat
    Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:06 AM
    Location
    In the EU
    Posts
    5,392
    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    They were commitments based on us being in the EU, we're leaving so the EU will no longer be able to waste our money, enjoy making up the shortfall.
    They are commitments made in the past that extend beyond the March 2019 deadline. This is not solely the EU budget until 2020. It includes commitments agreed by the UK to cover the Treaty of accession, a major financial commitment that I think will constitute the major portion of the bill. You don't agree to a major outlay like this and then walk away...not unless you want to make enemies.

    The Tories are trying to hoodwink joe public by combining the past commitments with future ones. They want to offset this bill against future payments for staying within part of the club. This way they can claim short term victories that the public can see whilst claiming they are paying substantially lower contributions than before in order to obtain the same benefits.

    It's a pipe dream and the eu will have none of it.

    The UK is doomed as long as it thinks it has the upper hand in these negotiations. It is doomed as long as people think the same way as buriamboy

  8. #83
    PAG
    PAG is offline
    Thailand Expat
    PAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:11 PM
    Location
    Chalong, Phuket
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by buriramboy View Post
    They were commitments based on us being in the EU, we're leaving so the EU will no longer be able to waste our money, enjoy making up the shortfall.
    They are commitments made in the past that extend beyond the March 2019 deadline. This is not solely the EU budget until 2020. It includes commitments agreed by the UK to cover the Treaty of accession, a major financial commitment that I think will constitute the major portion of the bill. You don't agree to a major outlay like this and then walk away...not unless you want to make enemies.

    The Tories are trying to hoodwink joe public by combining the past commitments with future ones. They want to offset this bill against future payments for staying within part of the club. This way they can claim short term victories that the public can see whilst claiming they are paying substantially lower contributions than before in order to obtain the same benefits.

    It's a pipe dream and the eu will have none of it.

    The UK is doomed as long as it thinks it has the upper hand in these negotiations. It is doomed as long as people think the same way as buriamboy
    Can't quite see what the 'Treaty of Accession' has to do with anything (they are the individual treaties with potential new EU member States, the last of which was enacted in 2011 for Croatia).

    It's incumbent on the applying new member state to meet the financial and administrative criteria of membership, so where does the UK fit into this scenario, other than the pre-accession amounts (the EU's contribution to help potential member states fulfill the qualification criteria). Some irony with this, the largest recipient of EU funds potential member state is Turkey, with some 636 million Euros a year. The irony being that Turkey has as much chance of joining the EU as North Korea.

    The current budget, as with all other EU budgets, runs through to 2020, one year after the UK will have left the EU (any transition period apart). The UK has already stated it will meet it's obligations for the current budget period. Why on earth should it commit funds for the next EU budget 2021-2027?

  9. #84
    Thailand Expat
    Hugh Cow's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:57 AM
    Location
    Qld/Bangkok
    Posts
    1,009
    One problem with Brexit appears to be the "services" sector which is running a 24 billion pound surplus in favour of Britain.
    A removal of this to say Frankfurt would be at some cost to the British economy including employment. On the other hand Britain's massive deficit in goods will become a large problem for the EU. Although as a percentage of EU GDP(I think a measure used by Seeking ABC) it is not that large, the pain will not be spread evenly in terms of lost revenue by country, should these goods be sourced elsewhere outside of the EU. The most affected countries will be Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Italy ,Spain, France which are some of the main contributors of EU funds (forget Belgium that lives nicely on the EU tit). No wonder the EU is so insistent on continuing welfare from Britain. They are also staring down the barrel of decreasing revenue.
    Until the final plan is revealed however this and other posts are purely supposition. One other fact not often mentioned is that the GDP of the vast majority of EU members has shrunk in the last 7 years. The problem with the Euro is although it helps prevent massive inflation in some circumstances (see Zimbabwe and Venezuela) It can hinder economic growth in poorer economies (see Greece) due to the lack of currency control.
    I have no axe to grind either way. I wish both parties in the divorce well but as most marriages in the west one usually does better out of the deal. I will wait to see which one is the "wife".

  10. #85
    Thailand Expat
    Troy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:06 AM
    Location
    In the EU
    Posts
    5,392
    A major portion of EU budget over the last 10 years has been funding the newly joined countries in order to narrow the gap between them and the rest of the EU. The UK fully supported this expenditure and need to honour those commitments.

    The last EU budget commitment for the period 2014 -2020 is expected to be fully realised by 2023. The UK contribution to that commitment alone is around 36bn. The UK government agreed prior to the talks in July that it had a financial commitment to the EU and would honour it. Why is it now saying it doesn't?

  11. #86
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,966
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    The UK government agreed prior to the talks in July that it had a financial commitment to the EU and would honour it. Why is it now saying it doesn't?
    It's not. It apears to be only in your mind.

  12. #87
    Sukhumvet
    VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:58 AM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    9,854

  13. #88
    PAG
    PAG is offline
    Thailand Expat
    PAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:11 PM
    Location
    Chalong, Phuket
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    A major portion of EU budget over the last 10 years has been funding the newly joined countries in order to narrow the gap between them and the rest of the EU. The UK fully supported this expenditure and need to honour those commitments.

    The last EU budget commitment for the period 2014 -2020 is expected to be fully realised by 2023. The UK contribution to that commitment alone is around 36bn. The UK government agreed prior to the talks in July that it had a financial commitment to the EU and would honour it. Why is it now saying it doesn't?
    I believe that the UK Government has said that it WILL honour those commitments (at least for the current 12-20 budget period). The EU budget for 21-27 hasn't even been made, so how on earth can the UK commit any funds to it?

    I believe that what the UK is saying is that any form of payment, ex gratia, outwith the current budget commitment, has to be substantiated in a more tangible form than depending on some form of largess act by the UK taxpayers.

    These squeals of exasperation from the EU negotiators is tiresome, and they're playing the 'no capitulation to our demands, no chance of even talking about trade' tactic which doesn't appear to be fazing the UK side (nor should it).

    The UK is not Greece, and shouldn't waiver in it's desire to get the best possible deal for the UK (and the EU for that matter), without buckling on blackmail and veiled threats.

  14. #89
    PAG
    PAG is offline
    Thailand Expat
    PAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:11 PM
    Location
    Chalong, Phuket
    Posts
    1,448
    and from today's Times:

    Manufacturers defy Brexit gloom with rapid growth


    Britain’s manufacturing sector is growing at one of the fastest rates in more than three years, according to a closely watched City indicator.

    At a time when negotiations between Britain and Brussels appear to have reached a low, the purchasing managers’ index (PMI) survey shows that manufacturers remain upbeat about the future, as the sharp fall in the pound since the Brexit vote has led to a surge of orders at home and abroad.

    Foreign demand for British goods remains at one of its strongest levels since data started being collected in 1996, having reached a record high in July. Companies said that they had noted especially strong growth in orders from Europe and America. Demand was also robust in the UK, leading business confidence among manufacturers to rise to one of the highest levels in more than a year.

    Winning business from overseas helped to support the fastest jobs growth since June 2014, according to the survey. “The figures are a clear sign that confidence is returning to the industry after years in the doldrums,” Edward Hardy, an economist at the currency firm World First, said. “This goes to show that despite parliamentary gridlock, pessimistic politicians and volatile financial markets, trade opportunities are still out there.”

    The PMI showed a reading of 56.9 last month, up from 55.3 in July and one of the strongest readings since 2014.

    A reading above 50 indicates growth; anything below is a sign that the sector is shrinking.

    The pound jumped on the news, rising to its highest level against the dollar in more than three weeks, nearly passing $1.30, and rising 0.5 per cent against the euro to €1.09. The pound has fallen by 13 per cent against a basket of currencies since the Brexit vote, which has proved a boost for manufacturers as it makes UK goods more attractive to overseas buyers.

    The manufacturing sector makes up about 10 per cent of the UK economy, but there are hopes it will play a more important role in economic growth at a time when consumer spending is slowing because of rising prices.

    A downside to the weakness of the pound has been the rising cost of raw materials from overseas. About 30 per cent of companies reported an increase in prices.

    The PMI surveys have consistently painted a better picture of health for the manufacturing sector than official figures. In the latest official figures, the manufacturing sector contracted by 0.6 per cent between April and June.

    PMI surveys are considered a better indicator of future growth and economists believe that official figures will soon start to reflect this.

    Andrew Wishart, an economist at Capital Economics, said: “The broad-based strength of the survey adds weight to our view that the sector will put a disappointing first half to the year behind it, and will probably provide a decent boost to [economic] growth in the second half of the year.”

    The PMI survey asked hundreds of manufacturing companies across the UK to state baldly whether conditions were better, worse or the same on a variety of subjects, such as the level of new orders, purchasing intentions, investment and expectations.

    It then takes the net position of the responses, adjusts for seasonal factors and produces a hard number.

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/n...owth-kgg7b6gzq

  15. #90
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:12 AM
    Posts
    5,293
    Quote Originally Posted by PAG
    Manufacturers defy Brexit gloom with rapid growth Britain’s manufacturing sector is growing at one of the fastest rates in more than three years, according to a closely watched City indicator.
    a star always shine the brightest just before it collapse

  16. #91
    Hiso member
    buriramboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,671
    You referring to Macron?

  17. #92
    Thailand Expat
    Dragonfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:12 AM
    Posts
    5,293
    not bad, but no, I was referring to the UK of course

  18. #93
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    9,640
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    I wonder what sort of raging moron concluded that was an argument for anything other than remaining.


    Oh yes, of course, a raging moron Brexiter.

    FFS...the whole monologue is predicated on the principle of pursuing Britain's best interests from within the union.



  19. #94
    Not a Mod.
    Begbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Lagrangian Point
    Posts
    10,979
    I like the way this guy thinks.


  20. #95
    PAG
    PAG is offline
    Thailand Expat
    PAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:11 PM
    Location
    Chalong, Phuket
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by PAG
    Manufacturers defy Brexit gloom with rapid growth Britainís manufacturing sector is growing at one of the fastest rates in more than three years, according to a closely watched City indicator.
    a star always shine the brightest just before it collapse
    Ah, I remember the wailling and gnashing of teeth about the UK not having the resources to be able to conduct negotiations with the EU. Apparently during the latest negotiations, a lawyer for the UK went point by point through the EU demands and proved them flawed and illegal. A point dismissed by the EU's chief negotiator as 'seeking nostalgia'.

  21. #96
    PAG
    PAG is offline
    Thailand Expat
    PAG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:11 PM
    Location
    Chalong, Phuket
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by Begbie View Post
    I like the way this guy thinks.

    Reducing the subsidies to Scotland will fix that problem.......

  22. #97
    R.I.P.
    DrB0b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNOTOAD
    Posts
    15,768
    Quote Originally Posted by PAG
    Apparently during the latest negotiations, a lawyer for the UK went point by point through the EU demands and proved them flawed and illegal.
    Apparently? Either it happened or it didn't happen. If it happened post a link showing this point by point refutation.

  23. #98
    Custom user
    Neverna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Teakdoor forum upgrade office
    Posts
    11,966
    ^ Michel Barnier accuses Britain of 'nostalgia' for benefits of EU membership in frosty press conference


    Michel Barnier accuses Britain of 'nostalgia' for benefits of EU membership in frosty press conference
    31 AUGUST 2017

    EU Brexit negotiators were left “flabbergasted” on Wednesday after their British counterparts launched a legal deconstruction of the so-called “Brexit bill” yesterday as the Brussels talks headed for an increasingly acrimonious impasse.
    signature

  24. #99
    Thailand Expat cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    9,640
    ^ There's absolutely nothing in that link that supports the contention I have put in bold...

    Quote Originally Posted by PAG
    Apparently during the latest negotiations, a lawyer for the UK went point by point through the EU demands and proved them flawed and illegal.
    I'm 'flabbergasted' by what an idiot buriramboy is. That's not because of the force of his arguments.

  25. #100
    Hiso member
    buriramboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    8,671
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    ^ There's absolutely nothing in that link that supports the contention I have put in bold...

    Quote Originally Posted by PAG
    Apparently during the latest negotiations, a lawyer for the UK went point by point through the EU demands and proved them flawed and illegal.
    I'm 'flabbergasted' by what an idiot buriramboy is. That's not because of the force of his arguments.
    I'm not surprised by what a tedious boring cvnt you continue to be though.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •