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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ^Why the Russians don't let themselves helped by some generous friends from outside, like was helped to Ukraine? (please no names here...)
    It's like listening to a really, really dumb shit version of Jeff.

  2. #102
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    No, he's no threat at all.

    So.....


    MOSCOW — Protesters gathered across Russia to support opposition leader Alexei Navalny’s call to boycott the March presidential election, and Navalny himself was arrested while walking to the Moscow demonstration.
    Many of the crowds that turned out in generally frigid weather skewed sharply young, apparently reflecting growing discontent among Russians who have lived most or all of their lives under President Vladimir Putin, who came to power on New Year’s Eve 1999.
    “As long as I’ve been alive, Putin has always been in. I’m tired of nothing being changed,” said 19-year-old Vlad Ivanov, one of about 1,500 protesters who assembled in St. Petersburg.
    Navalny, Putin’s most prominent foe, organized the protests to urge a boycott of Russia’s March 18 presidential election, in which Putin is sure to win a fourth term. He was wrestled to the ground and forced into a police bus as he walked toward the demonstration on Moscow’s Pushkin Square.
    https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/n...cott-election/

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    “As long as I’ve been alive, Putin has always been in. I’m tired of nothing being changed,” said 19-year-old Vlad Ivanov,

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post

    So his age matches your IQ. What's your point?

  5. #105
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    As the instigator of illegal political demonstrations he was arrested and charged under national law. I suspect similar to those in other democratic countries.

    There are of course some allegedly democratic countries where an elite are above the law.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    As the instigator of illegal political demonstrations he was arrested and charged under national law. I suspect similar to those in other democratic countries.

    There are of course some allegedly democratic countries where an elite are above the law.

    But of course he's no threat to Vlad.... Nor are any of the other peaceful protestors arrested under Vlad's "No-one can oppose me, I own Russia" laws.


  7. #107
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    I suspect the leader of the majority party in the Russian parliment has a similar position to most democratic governments leaders when it comes to law making.

  8. #108
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    Indeed, passes the laws his paymasters tell him to.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I suspect the leader of the majority party in the Russian parliment has a similar position to most democratic governments leaders when it comes to law making.
    I don't think so.

    He does what fucking vlad tells him or he's mining salt in Siberia.

  10. #110
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    Navalny sent his spokespeople abroad to livestream Sunday's nationwide protests. The police grabbed them at the airport when they flew home

    When Alexey Navalny’s two spokespeople, Kira Yarmysh and Ruslan Shaveddinov, landed at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport on Tuesday, customs officials and police officers were waiting for them. The authorities detained the two activists, who anchor the YouTube channel “Navalny Live,” on charges of inciting unsanctioned protests. Yarmysh and Shaveddinov were coming home after successfully broadcasting Sunday’s nationwide “voters’ boycott” protests from an unknown location abroad.


    On January 28, Yarmysh and Shaveddinov anchored a 14-hour YouTube livestream of “voters’ boycott” demonstrations in cities throughout Russia. In order to evade police crackdown, the two activists apparently went abroad for the broadcast.


    During Sunday’s nationwide protests, Moscow police raided the office of Alexey Navalny’s Anti-Corruption Foundation, sawing through the doors of three locked rooms in a failed effort to find and cut the feed on the “Navalny Live” YouTube broadcast. Officers detained journalist Dmitry Nizovtsev, who was found inside the office, for disobeying police orders. While being detained, Nizovtsev repeatedly asked the officers to identify themselves, but they ignored him. He was later sentenced to 10 days in jail. Alexander Pomazuev, a lawyer for the organization, got the same punishment.



    According to the website OVD-Info, police detained 350 demonstrators around the country on Sunday. Most of these people were soon released without charges. Navalny was also released, but he is required to report back for additional questioning.

    https://meduza.io/en/news/2018/01/30...they-flew-home

  11. #111
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Seems things would be better if they let Navalny run in the election, get his ".0001" percent of the vote fairly, then be done with it.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Seems things would be better if they let Navalny run in the election, get his ".0001" percent of the vote fairly, then be done with it.
    The implication is obvious.

    Putin knows how many people really oppose him. All these "polls" he keeps organising with him being the most popular world leader since Kim Jong Il are just fantasy.

  13. #113
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    Awards and honors[edit]Navalny was named "Person of the Year 2009" by Russian business newspaper Vedomosti.[223]


    Navalny was a World Fellow at Yale University's World Fellows Program, aimed at "creating a global network of emerging leaders and to broaden international understanding" in 2010.[224]


    In 2011, Foreign Policy magazine named Navalny to the FP Top 100 Global Thinkers, along with Daniel Domscheit-Berg and Sami Ben Gharbia of Tunisia, for "shaping the new world of government transparency".[225] FP picked him again in 2012.[226] He was listed by Time magazine in 2012 as one of the world's 100 most influential people, the only Russian on the list.[227] In 2013, Navalny came in at No. 48 among "world thinkers" in an online poll by the UK magazine Prospect.[228]


    In 2015, Alexei and Oleg Navalny were chosen to receive the "Prize of the Platform of European Memory and Conscience 2015". According to the Platform's statement, "The Members of the Platform have voted this year for the Navalny brothers, in recognition of their personal courage, struggle and sacrifices for upholding fundamental democratic values and freedoms in the Russian Federation today. By the award of the Prize, the Platform wishes to express its respect and support to Mr Oleg Navalny whom the Platform considers a political prisoner and to Mr Alexei Navalny for his efforts to expose corruption, defend political pluralism and opposition to the mounting authoritarian regime in the Russian Federation".[229]


    In June 2017, Navalny was included Time magazine's list of the World's 25 Most Influential People on the Internet.[230]


    Cheap embezzeler (thus controllable) is clearly a western stooge. The only people who take him seriously are the people sucking on the CNN and State Department titties. He is a no one. A nobody. the US tried this before with that bloke they had topped trying to blame PUTIN, but it failed, so they are trying it again hoping the Rooooskies will fall for it, and start a western promoted and back "color" revolution in Russia.

    But alas... they don't want to play ball. Shame for this guy. The next step is the MErkins will murder him to blame it on poooootin.
    "It's a small place so don't tell porkies"

  14. #114
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    Russia has allegedly a population of 144,000,000. Of which, allegedly 2,000 illegally marched in Moscow, 2,500 illegally marched in St. Peters.. and a few hundred in the rest of Russia.

    So a very small, 0.001% .

    Nobody cares except you two. Have a beer.

  15. #115
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    More people queued up for the new iPhone in Russia than went on those marches


    It really is pitiful the bollocks these two fall for

  16. #116
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    Which, if you had even one functioning brain cell, should make you wonder why vlad is so paranoid....



  17. #117
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    'arry, the Russian police and judiciary are upholding Russian laws.

    One thing else some countries have failed their citizens on, time after time.....

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    'arry, the Russian police and judiciary are upholding Russian laws.

    One thing else some countries have failed their citizens on, time after time.....
    *Cough* Upholding Putin laws *Cough*


  19. #119
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    ‘Sit tight and we’ll let you go soon without a problem’

    Volgograd journalists recount how cops herded them into police vans, so they couldn’t film a crackdown on protesters


    On January 28, opposition politician Alexey Navalny organized rallies in dozens of cities across Russia to promote a “voters’ boycott” on March 18, when the country holds its next presidential election. In many places, the demonstrations didn’t have permits from the local authorities, and law enforcement detained a few hundred people in total. In Volgograd, before police moved in on the crowd, officers moved the press corps into buses, rounding up photographers especially, apparently to prevent photos of the crackdown. The journalists were taken to a local police station and released without charges. Meduza spoke to some of these reporters to find out just what happened on January 28.



    Ekaterina Gerasimova

    journalist for the website Volzhskii.ru


    I went to the January 28 demonstration on a routine assignment. There had been incidents involving the police at previous rallies, but they had involved only Navalny's supporters — not journalists. So none of my colleagues was expecting anything like this.


    When the rally was actually underway, the police asked everyone from the press to get into a police van. They were polite but insistent and they didn’t take no for an answer.


    There were six journalists in the bus, including my husband, who was also on assignment. Ending up together in police custody was a new chapter in our history together. All of us that day had come from different news agencies to report.


    The police officers offered no explanations and didn’t say why we were being detained. They drove us around downtown Volgograd for about an hour, and there were already jokes circulating on social media that the cops were joyriding with all the reporters or taking us on a sightseeing excursion.


    Eventually, they brought us to the central police station, where they wrote down our passport details and released us. We're now discussing next steps with our colleagues. The chief editors at several publications (including mine) have sent formal inquiries to the Interior Ministry, requesting an explanation of the reasons for detaining members of the press. It's hard to make any predictions just yet. We’ll wait for their response and then decide with our colleagues what to do next.


    Ruslan Gerasimov

    photo editor for the website Novosti Volgograda


    I was as careful as possible, knowing that the demonstration didn’t have a permit and that there might be trouble or provocations. People started assembling at about 2:00 p.m. Thirty minutes later, the crowd set off down Lenin Avenue, heading for downtown. The police — including riot police — blocked the crowd's path at the exit leading out from a pedestrian tunnel. The demonstrators had only come about 150 meters [about 500 feet]. This is where the police started detaining people.


    I was standing behind the riot police, doing my job — filming what was happening. Then, without giving their names, two police officers came up and asked me to board a police bus. I tried showing my press credentials, but they said, “You can show your credentials in the bus.” I invoked Article 144 of the Russian Federation Criminal Code [which prohibits interfering with journalists’ lawful professional activity], but it was no use. Firmly but politely, they forced me inside the bus.


    Once inside, I saw my colleagues from other publications. I was very surprised: I hadn't seen them being detained. I immediately called my wife to warn her that I'd been taken, and to ask her to get out of the crowd. I was too late, it turned out — they brought her to the van a couple of minutes later. Immediately, I wrote about our detentions on [the social network] Telegram, asking people to share it as widely as possible.


    We drove around downtown, and they didn’t give us a single reason for having detained us. Whenever we asked them a question, they said, “We’re just doing our jobs.” Incidentally, talking to them in private, the officers’ were remarkably sensitive. I probably have to agree with Navalny that the police actually support his political views to a great extent. These are ordinary people — they take off the uniform at the end of the day and go shopping, like anybody.


    We never got an apology or an explanation, but it shows that we were processed at the station promptly — with exaggerated respect, even.


    I’m of two minds about the whole thing. I'm not afraid to go and work at rallies — it's my job. But such disregard for and indifference toward the rights of journalists is something new. Who came up with the idea of detaining journalists — all the journalists — working at a demonstration? It makes no sense to detain journalists. If you don't want them to write anything, just make sure nothing happens.



    Alexey Volkhonsky / V1.ru-Volgograd
    Slava Yashchenko

    photographer for Kavkazskii Uzel


    I saw the police detaining journalist Yaroslav Malykh and I tried to explain to the officer that Yaroslav was working. “Just take a look at the credentials he’s showing you,” I said. For some reason, they left me alone then. After another 30 minutes, I saw police detaining an activist. I started taking pictures, and then an officer grabbed me by the elbow. He refused to listen when I said I was a journalist, ignoring my credentials, and bringing me to the police van with the activist. There were only two other people detained in the van — everyone else was a police officer. I offered to show the captain my credentials, so they’d leave me alone. But he said, “This has got nothing to do with me.” I tried to get out of the bus, but they wouldn't let me.


    They took us to a police van at the upper terrace of the embankment, where they were bringing some of the activists. They made me wait in line to be searched before putting me in the bus. While I was waiting in line, I heard someone call my name. It was the chief editor of New Day, a local news agency, and he asked what I was doing waiting in line with the activists. My colleague talked to the police officer, and he let me go. We never got photos of the most interesting stuff.


    This situation is an important moment for the journalists around here. Personally, I'm going to sue, and my newsroom supports me. If my colleagues issue a collective statement, I'll support it. What happened was an insult, and we need to respond. The regional journalists’ union, meanwhile, has taken a bizarre position by not reacting at all. I visit there website every day to see if they’ve appealed to the governor yet or to somebody. But as far as they’re concerned, it’s like nothing even happened.


    Alexey Volkhonsky
    photographer for V1.ru-Volgograd


    I wasn’t worried at first. I figured the police would probably be able to distinguish me from an activist, who go around chanting slogans and carrying banners. And the police officers here all know who the journalists are. But we were the very first to be detained. The whole time, I kept running ahead to photograph the crowd, and then these two uniformed officers came up and said, “What are you doing?” I showed them my press credentials, and they said, “Well, we didn’t notice, but we’ll sort it out later. For now, come with us to the van.” I only managed to photograph the demonstration for about seven minutes, and then it was off to the police van. When we got there, an officer was waiting. In an understanding tone, he said, “Sorry, guys. This is nothing personal. Sit tight and we’ll let you go soon without a problem.”


    They brought a few other journalists to the van next, and only afterwards did the police start detaining activists.


    My impression is that everything that happened to us was somebody’s dumb idea. An order probably went out telling the police to keep arrest photos out of the papers, and so somebody decided to detain the journalists. On top of that, Vladimir Putin would visit Volgograd on February 2. Maybe they were trying to hide bad news from the president? But we’re not living in the year 2000, when there wasn’t any Internet here.
    * * *

    On January 29, Volgograd’s Interior Ministry contacted local media outlets, explaining that protest sites are “danger zones.” The document also stated that journalists have the right to photograph demonstrators, but they must present their press credentials immediately upon request. The ministry’s message said nothing about the detention of several reporters a day earlier at Navalny’s “voters’ boycott” rally. Officials did not respond to Meduza’s requests for a comment on this story.

    https://meduza.io/en/feature/2018/02...hout-a-problem

  20. #120
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    Who cares how these people stirring sh*t are "suffering"? in Volgograd? What for they come?

    Volgograd? That the new name for Stalingrad that just is celebrating 75 years of its battle that:

    turned tide of WW2
    Published time: 2 Feb, 2018

    February 2 marks the 75th anniversary of the German surrender at Stalingrad. While the five-month battle remains a symbol of World War II, its practical importance to defeating the Nazis deserves more attention.

    Stalingrad was the biggest and bloodiest battle in the history of warfare. Estimates vary, but fighting between August 1942 and February 1943 is thought to have resulted in up to 2 million casualties, with more than a million dead.

    https://www.rt.com/news/417666-germa...stalingrad-75/


    Battle of Stalingrad yields more of its dead, 75 years later

    Battle of Stalingrad yields more of its dead, 75 years later - World - CBC News

  21. #121
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    But perhaps it is not important as suffering of "Meduza"

    Russians take to streets in their thousands to mark 75 years since Battle of Stalingrad
    Commemorations on anniversary of famous Soviet victory express national pride amid resentment for Winter Olympics ban



    Russians take to streets in their thousands to mark 75 years since Battle of Stalingrad | The Independent

  22. #122
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    ^ Why don't you start a new thread? It is interesting but in the wrong place.

  23. #123
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    Ah bless, they are worried about him so little that now they are inventing charges that he assaulted the police.

    He must have struck their fists forcefully with his face, no doubt in the police van where he knew there would be no witnesses, the vicious thug.

    Investigators in Moscow have summoned opposition politician Aleksei Navalny for questioning over what they claim was an assault on the police officers who detained him at a rally late last month.
    Navalny wrote on Twitter that police came to his home at 7:30 a.m. local time on February 5 and handed him two subpoenas.
    He said he was accused of "hitting the police" who detained him at the protests, one of dozens that Navalny organized nationwide on January 28 to rally in support of his call for a boycott of Russia's upcoming presidential election.
    Navalny also wrote on Instagram that the case against him was linked to a video showing the moment he was detained.
    The video shows officers wrestling a struggling Navalny to the ground and bundling him into a police bus. It does not show him striking the police.
    Navalny was among at least 350 people detained at the demonstrations on January 28.
    The Investigative Committee said that several police officers suffered bodily injuries while detaining people at the protests.
    Navalny was released later the same day pending a court hearing, which has not yet been held.
    A vocal opponent of President Vladimir Putin, Navalny called for the boycott of the March 18 presidential poll after election authorities in December barred him from running because of a criminal conviction he contends was fabricated.
    Navalny has said the vote will not be a real, democratic election but the "reappointment" of Putin, who has been president or prime minister since 1999 and is seeking a new six-year term.
    Kremlin critics say most of the other candidates are being used as window-dressing in a vote that Putin is certain to win in Russia's tightly controlled political environment.

    https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-naval.../29019387.html

  24. #124
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    On Sunday, Russian police forces arrested opposition leader Aleksei Navalny yet again. Mr. Navalny’s crime? He had organized a nationwide protest, urging a boycott of the March 18 Russian presidential election.

    His call to protest was widely successful. His supporters held rallies in about 100 cities across the country. Mr. Navalnyhas already been released, but awaits a court trial in the near future.

    A 41-year-old lawyer, Mr. Navalny is a strong force of “anti-Putinism.” For approximately the past 10 years, he has worked tirelessly to eradicate corruption from the Kremlin, seeking to become Russia’s next president in the process. To remove corruption, for instance, he drafted a bill that bans officials from purchasing cars worth more than 1.5 million rubles and initiated a project called “RosPil” that has disclosed hundreds of financial violations committed by state-run agencies and organizations.

    How is the Kremlin corrupt? In particular, Russian heads of government essentially steal cash from citizens for their own personal use. To illustrate, President Vladimir Putin essentially owns a palace, validating his net worth of roughly $200 billion. Mr. Navalny himself has confirmed this illegal debauchery, based on past access to internal financial documents.

    How widespread is the corruption? On Monday, the U.S. Treasury Department released a list of over 200 Russian oligarchs associated with Mr. Putin. Each of the oligarchs is now eligible for sanctions — and each is reportedly worth more than $1 billion. The point is that the corruption of these officials, dismally, has caused poverty, inequality and a lack of opportunities for the Russian population.

    Naturally, Mr. Putin feels threatened by Mr. Navalny and barred him last month from running in the election. This comes as no surprise since Mr. Navalny has been gaining popularity by the day.

    Because the Kremlin controls Russian television and resents Mr. Navalny, it strictly prohibits him from advancing his campaign through TV commercials. To dodge this, Mr. Navalny actually has created a YouTube channel, which has a following of almost 1.7 million subscribers. He also has vastly utilized the traditional and perhaps more effective technique, by holding dozens of outdoor rallies all over Russia the past few years to engage directly with average Russians.

    For the most part, the approach has worked well for Mr. Navalny. He has been successful in acquiring supporters and national recognition. For example, one of his latest rallies gathered thousands of supporters across Russia. At these types of events, he gives speeches on matters such as Mr. Putin’s financial thievery and the general corruption of the Russian government.

    It is important to note that Mr. Navalny has been holding many of these rallies without official permits, leading to several arrests of him by the police, such as the one this past weekend. Anyway, the Kremlin would probably never grant him rallying permits since he is such a strong advocate against Mr. Putin and his cronies.

    Mr. Navalny’s impact on Russian citizens is larger than one might realize, in spite of everything that has afflicted him. He has created a social movement for all citizens of the Russian Federation, symbolizing that they, too, can have a voice and that there is hope for political change in Russia’s future someday. His outspokenness about the truth has sparked a light within Russia — tens of thousands of people in the past year have also been arrested for protesting against the Kremlin’s criminal acts.

    Mr. Navalny believes that an election without him is not an election. Without him, the election is not a democratic process — it is merely a continuation of Mr. Putin’s control. In continuing to boycott, Mr. Navalny hopes to achieve low voter turnout for Putin, since the opposite is needed to secure a win, and raise awareness that Russia needs competitive and fair elections now, not in six years when the next election occurs.

    Even if Aleksei Navalny does not make it out alive, which is a likely conclusion, his legacy is effecting essential change, beginning in the hearts and minds of the Russian people. If change does come to Russia someday, then Mr. Navalny will go down in history as the one who made it happen.

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news...m-the-kremlin/

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    *Cough* Upholding Putin laws *Cough*


    I'm sure he, as the President and the leader of the largest political party, has some intelligent, considered input.

    One wonders how other "democratic" governments decide how to create/amend the counties laws.

    1. Ask the 3 to 14 years olds to have a gym class discussion and put them, after allowing fuckbook's algos to "clear" or modify them (after they've checked the very, very important "trending" graph), directly into the statute book.

    2. A "rigorous" debate in one or two institutions, televised of course so today's favourite can be shown on the government controlled MSM. Once the media show is over these "democratically elected" politicians are led through the lobby where the "democratically elected" politicians vote, as told to by the whips/party leaders/their funding corporations/MI5/anything to do with NI - when the money reaches the bank accounts of the favoured few.

    3. Receive a telephone call from an unexceptional countries leader, threatening to destroy their currency, release the dodgy photos or bomb them back to the stone-age if they don't crawl as demanded.

    There are maybe more ways to create laws, but climbing mountains and coming back with a couple of stone slabs seems old hat in these digital days.

    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

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