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  1. #26
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    [quote=thaimeme;3403781]Is there really much difference between the so-called "fake" news and the already entrench bodies of biased, manipulated, modified, and omitted news?


    Sounds a lot like the bible.....

  2. #27
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Just came across this three week old article. Just a good way to make money for these kids.


    How Teens In The Balkans Are Duping Trump Supporters With Fake News

    BuzzFeed News identified more than 100 pro-Trump websites being run from a single town in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

    “This is the news of the millennium!” said the story on WorldPoliticus.com. Citing unnamed FBI sources, it claimed Hillary Clinton will be indicted in 2017 for crimes related to her email scandal.

    “Your Prayers Have Been Answered,” declared the headline.

    For Trump supporters, that certainly seemed to be the case. They helped the baseless story generate over 140,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook.

    Meanwhile, roughly 6,000 miles away in a small town in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, a young man watched as money began trickling into his Google AdSense account.

    Over the past year, the Macedonian town of Veles (population 45,000) has experienced a digital gold rush as locals launched at least 140 US politics websites.

    These sites have American-sounding domain names such as WorldPoliticus.com, TrumpVision365.com, USConservativeToday.com, DonaldTrumpNews.co, and USADailyPolitics.com. They almost all publish aggressively pro-Trump content aimed at conservatives and Trump supporters in the US.

    The young Macedonians who run these sites say they don’t care about Donald Trump. They are responding to straightforward economic incentives: As Facebook regularly reveals in earnings reports, a US Facebook user is worth about four times a user outside the US. The fraction-of-a-penny-per-click of US display advertising — a declining market for American publishers — goes a long way in Veles. Several teens and young men who run these sites told BuzzFeed News that they learned the best way to generate traffic is to get their politics stories to spread on Facebook — and the best way to generate shares on Facebook is to publish sensationalist and often false content that caters to Trump supporters.

    remainder of article https://www.buzzfeed.com/craigsilver...7a7#.sp6k2aPOP

  3. #28
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    Amazing how much new business they are hoping to generate from this fake set up.
    If Hiliary had one the same claims would have been made.

  4. #29
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    ^ What are you blathering about? Clearly not a smart lad are you?

  5. #30
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    The agenda is obvious; only allow the fake news stories that benefit the libtards. Very few people are going to fall for this fake news outside lalaland.

  6. #31
    Thailand Expat Humbert's Avatar
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    Donald Trump and the Rise of Alt-Reality Media

    ...So what is this brave new conservative media going to look like? Probably more like Alex Jones than National Review. The appointment of Breitbart’s Steve Bannon as chief adviser to the president-elect was the new regime’s implicit imprimatur on the new conservative media. But perhaps the most revealing moment was Trump’s reported call, on the Monday after the election, to Infowar’s Alex Jones to thank him for his support in the campaign.

    Jones is not your garden variety conspiracy theorist. He is a 9/11 truther, who believes the U.S. government conspired in the attacks to justify the creation of a police state. He has suggested that the government also may have been behind the bombings in Oklahoma City, that killed 168 people, and at the Boston Marathon, that killed three. And he has repeatedly suggested that the Sandy Hook shootings were a “hoax,” “synthetic” and “completely fake.” He also thinks the government wants to “encourage homosexuality so people don’t have children,” and said that Hillary Clinton was “a frickin' demon and she stinks and so does Obama.”

    Jones has claimed that he has 5 million daily listeners to his radio shows, which he simulcasts on his website and extends through his YouTube channel. The Drudge Report routinely links to his stories. “I think Alex Jones may be the single most important voice in the alternative conservative media,” says Trump whisperer Roger Stone, who describes the conspiracy theorist as “a valuable asset” who will “rally the people around President Trump’s legislative program.”

    When he called recently, the newly elected president of the United States promised Jones to return to his show. The Washington Post called the promise “an extraordinary gesture for an incoming president whose schedule is packed with calls from world leaders and the enormous task of overseeing the transition.” Perhaps more disturbing was the realization that the president-elect listens to this guy.

    It’s possible that a Trump loss would have led to an exorcism of the worst elements of the conservative media. But they saw Trump’s victory as their victory too. The newly weaponized conservative media genuinely believe that they have changed the paradigm of media coverage. In the new alt-reality bubble, negative information simply no longer penetrates; gaffes and scandals can be snuffed out, ignored, or spun; counternarratives can be launched. Trump has proven that a candidate could be immune to the narratives, criticism and fact-checking of the mainstream media. This was, after all, a campaign in which a presidential candidate trafficked in “scoops” from the National Enquirer. And got away with it.

    No wonder “fake news” could flourish in this environment.

    “Honestly,” Paul Horner, one of the creators of fake news, told the Washington Post last week, “people are definitely dumber. They just keep passing stuff around. Nobody fact-checks anything anymore—I mean, that’s how Trump got elected. He just said whatever he wanted, and people believed everything, and when the things he said turned out not to be true, people didn’t care because they’d already accepted it. It’s real scary. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

    So when, three days before the election, a fake news site posted: “FBI Agent Suspected in Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead,” the story could go viral, getting 560,000 shares on Facebook alone. Similar bogus stories were shared millions of times during the campaign. But this didn’t happen in a vacuum: Such stories fit easily into a media ecosystem that embraced an Alex Jones.

    Donald Trump and the Rise of Alt-Reality Media - POLITICO Magazine
    This post has not been authorized by the TeakDoor censorship committee.

  7. #32
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme
    Is there really much difference between the so-called "fake" news and the already entrench bodies of biased, manipulated, modified, and omitted news?
    Not much. Only a matter of the degree to which a particular source skews it's "news" coverage to align with it's political agenda. Fake news has a corrisive power because there are folks who with a simple google search, find it, read it and believe it is gospel because it is "reported". However, "mainstream" media's corrosive power far exceeds "fake" news due to the false notion viewers believe reports are unbiased and represent the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

    Here in speakers corner I have a bit of fun debating world news but at the end of the day the only news I believe and is of direct impact on my life is local news. News I can personally verify and observe. All the rest is clutter for the mind and fodder fir SC debate with little or no impact on my life.

  8. #33
    Thailand Expat Humbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by thaimeme Is there really much difference between the so-called "fake" news and the already entrench bodies of biased, manipulated, modified, and omitted news? Not much. Only a matter of the degree to which a particular source skews it's "news" coverage to align with it's political agenda
    Sure, because if the Sandy Hook massacre actually happened or was staged by the government is just a matter of a political agenda.

  9. #34
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert
    Sandy Hook massacre actually happened or was staged by the government is just a matter of a political agenda
    Yep. All sorts of "theories" related to Sandy Hook. I feel sympathy for the kids and families but would be far more concerned about gun control if it happened closer to home like in Buriram.

  10. #35
    Thailand Expat Humbert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton
    I feel sympathy for the kids and families but would be far more concerned about gun control if it happened closer to home like in Buriram.
    I've got 6 grandchildren in the states. My concern is for them not me.

  11. #36
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
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    More on the 'fake news' front...



    Washington Post’s ‘Fake News’ Guilt
    https://consortiumnews.com/2016/11/2...ke-news-guilt/

    Exclusive: The “fake news” theme has captivated The Washington Post and the mainstream U.S. media so much that it is stooping to McCarthyistic smears against news outlets that don’t toe the State Department’s propaganda line, says Robert Parry.

    By Robert Parry

    The mainstream U.S. media’s hysteria over “fake news” has reached its logical (or illogical) zenith, a McCarthyistic black-listing of honest journalism that simply shows professional skepticism toward Officialdom, including what’s said by U.S. government officials and what’s written in The Washington Post and New York Times.

    Apparently, to show skepticism now opens you to accusations of disseminating “Russian propaganda” or being a “useful idiot” or some similar ugly smear reminiscent of the old Cold War. Now that we have entered a New Cold War, I suppose it makes sense that we should expect a New McCarthyism.


    Lawyer Roy Cohn (right) with Sen. Joseph McCarthy.

    After returning from a Thanksgiving trip to Philadelphia on Saturday, I received word that Consortiumnews.com, the 21-year-old investigative news site that has challenged misguided “group thinks” whether from Republicans, Democrats or anyone else over those two-plus decades, was included among some 200 Internet sites spreading what some anonymous Web site, PropOrNot, deems “Russian propaganda.”

    I would normally ignore such nonsense but it was elevated by The Washington Post, which treated these unnamed “independent researchers” as sophisticated experts who “tracked” the Russian propaganda operation and assembled the black list.

    And I’m not joking when I say that these neo-McCarthyites go unnamed. The Post’s article by Craig Timberg on Thursday described PropOrNot simply as “a nonpartisan collection of researchers with foreign policy, military and technology backgrounds [who] planned to release its own findings Friday showing the startling reach and effectiveness of Russian propaganda campaigns.”
    Above I've highlighted the problem MSM has with so called fake news...story continued at link.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin
    Robert Parry
    This man is a respected journalist IMHO. I do not think that the little laughing emoji was in proper context because the Posts article was credible in my eyes. The source quoted may have overstepped to a degree but this fake news phenomenon has been around for some time but it just exploded with Trump supporters. Boon Mee used to quote from bogus fake news all the time.

  13. #38
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    We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned

    This is the fake news that I am referring to that is a epic problem....


    A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election. One that got a lot of traffic had this headline: "FBI Agent Suspected In Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead In Apparent Murder-Suicide." The story is completely false, but it was shared on Facebook over half a million times.

    We wondered who was behind that story and why it was written. It appeared on a site that had the look and feel of a local newspaper. Denverguardian.com even had the local weather. But it had only one news story — the fake one.

    We tried to look up who owned it and hit a wall. The site was registered anonymously. So, we brought in some professional help.

    By day, John Jansen is head of engineering at Master-McNeil Inc., a tech company in Berkeley. In the interest of real news he helped us track down the owner of Denverguardian.com.

    Jansen started by looking at the site’s history. “Commonly that’s called scraping or crawling websites,” he says.

    Jansen is kind of like an archaeologist. He says that nothing you do on the Web disappears — it just gets buried — like a fossil. But if you do some digging, you’ll find those fossils and learn a lot of history.

    The Denver Guardian was built and designed using a pretty common platform — WordPress. It’s used by bloggers and people who want to create their own websites. Jansen found the first entry ever for the site was done by someone with the handle LetTexasSecede.

    “That was sort of the thread that started to unravel everything,” Jansen says. “I was able to track that through to a bunch of other sites, which are where that handle is also present.”

    The sites include NationalReport.net, USAToday.com.co, WashingtonPost.com.co. All the addresses linked to a single rented server inside Amazon Web Services. That meant they were all likely owned by the same company. Jansen found an email address on one of those sites and he was able to link that address to a name: Jestin Coler.

    Online, Coler was listed as the founder and CEO of a company called Disinfomedia. Coler’s LinkedIn profile said he once sold magazine subscriptions, worked as a database administrator, and as a freelance writer for, among others, International Yachtsman magazine. And, using his name, we found a home address.
    On a warm, sunny afternoon I set out with a producer for a suburb of Los Angeles. Coler lived in a middle-class neighborhood of pastel-colored one-story beach bungalows. His home had an unwatered lawn — probably the result of California’s ongoing drought. There was a black minivan in the driveway and a large prominent American flag.

    We rang the front doorbell and a man answered, his face obscured by a heavy mesh steel screen. I asked for Jestin Coler. The man indicated that’s who he was. But when I asked about Disinfomedia, he said, “I don’t know what to tell you guys. Have a good day.”

    We left Coler our contact information, thinking he wasn’t likely to talk. But a couple of hours later he had a change of heart. He sent us an email and we set up an interview.

    Coler is a soft-spoken 40-year-old with a wife and two kids. He says he got into fake news around 2013 to highlight the extremism of the white nationalist alt-right.
    “The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right, publish blatantly fictional stories and then be able to publicly denounce those stories and point out the fact that they were fiction,” Coler says.

    He was amazed at how quickly fake news could spread and how easily people believe it. He wrote one fake story for NationalReport.net about how customers in Colorado marijuana shops were using food stamps to buy pot.

    “What that turned into was a state representative in the House in Colorado proposing actual legislation to prevent people from using their food stamps to buy marijuana, based on something that had just never happened,” Coler says.

    During the runup to the presidential election, fake news really took off. “It was just anybody with a blog can get on there and find a big, huge Facebook group of kind of rabid Trump supporters just waiting to eat up this red meat that they’re about to get served,” Coler says. “It caused an explosion in the number of sites. I mean, my gosh, the number of just fake accounts on Facebook exploded during the Trump election.”

    Coler says his writers have tried to write fake news for liberals — but they just never take the bait.

    Coler’s company, Disinfomedia, owns many faux news sites — he won’t say how many. But he says his is one of the biggest fake news businesses out there, which makes him kind of like a godfather of the industry.

    At any given time Coler says he’s got between 20 and 25 writers. And it was one of them that wrote the story in the Denver Guardian that an FBI agent who leaked Clinton emails was killed. Coler says that over 10 days the site got 1.6 million views. He says stories like this work because they fit into existing right-wing conspiracy theories.

    “The people wanted to hear this,” he says. “So all it took was to write that story. Everything about it was fictional: the town, the people, the sheriff, the FBI guy. And then … our social media guys kind of go out and do a little dropping it throughout Trump groups and Trump forums, and boy it spread like wildfire.”
    And as the stories spread, Coler makes money from the ads on his websites. He wouldn’t give exact figures, but he says stories about other fake news proprietors making between $10,000 and $30,000 a month apply to him. Coler fits into a pattern of other faux news sites that make good money, especially by targeting Trump supporters.

    However, Coler insists this is not about money. It’s about showing how easily fake news spreads. And fake news spread wide and far before the election. When I pointed out to Coler that the money gave him a lot of incentive to keep doing it regardless of the impact, he admitted that was “correct.”

    Coler says he has tried to shine a light on the problem of fake news. He has spoken to the media about it. But those organizations didn’t know who he actually was. He gave them a fake name: Allen Montgomery.

    Coler, a registered Democrat, says he has no regrets about his fake news empire. He doesn’t think fake news swayed the election.

    “There are many factors as to why Trump won that don’t involve fake news,” he says. “As much as I like Hillary, she was a poor candidate. She brought in a lot of baggage.”

    Coler doesn’t think fake news is going away. One of his sites — NationalReport.net — was flagged as fake news under a new Google policy, and Google stopped running ads on it. But Coler had other options.

    “There are literally hundreds of ad networks,” he says. “Early last week, my inbox was just filled every day with people because they knew that Google was cracking down — hundreds of people wanting to work with my sites.”

    Coler says he’s been talking it over with his wife and he may be getting out of the fake news racket. But, he says, dozens, maybe hundreds of entrepreneurs will be ready to take his place. And he thinks it will only get harder to tell their websites from real news sites. They know now that fake news sells and they will only be in it for the money.


    We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered : NPR

  14. #39
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    If that is to much reading for some of you....

    Below are highlights of NPR’s interview with Jestin Coler.

    Interview Highlights

    Tell me a little about why you started Disinfomedia?

    Late 2012, early 2013 I was spending a lot of time researching what is now being referred to as the alt-right. I identified a problem with the news that they were spreading and created Disinfomedia as a response to that. The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right, publish blatantly false or fictional stories, and then be able to publicly denounce those stories and point out the fact that they were fiction.

    What got you engaged in this?

    My educational background is in political science. I’ve always enjoyed the ideas of propaganda and misinformation. Then I coupled that with an interest in what makes things go viral. So that led me to finding those groups and ultimately to finding contributors. But it was just something I had an interest in that I wanted to pursue.

    When did you notice that fake news does best with Trump supporters?

    Well this isn’t just a Trump supporter problem. This is a right-wing issue. Sarah Palin’s famous blasting of the lame-stream media is kind of record and testament to the rise of these kinds of people. The post-fact era is what I would refer to it as. This isn’t something that started with Trump. This is something that’s been in the works for a while. His whole campaign was this thing of discrediting mainstream media sources, which is one of those dog whistles to his supporters. When we were coming up with headlines it’s always kind of about the red meat. Trump really got into the red meat. He knew who his base was. He knew how to feed them a constant diet of this red meat.

    We’ve tried to do similar things to liberals. It just has never worked, it never takes off. You’ll get debunked within the first two comments and then the whole thing just kind of fizzles out.
    How many domains do you own and run?

    Well, I would say there’s somewhere around 25 domains that I am currently managing. National Report has been my bread and butter, where I’ve spent most of my time. I have people who work with me and for me in developing and maintaining the other sites and social media kind of stuff. (Coler later said not all his sites are fake news.) So I, for the most part, focus on National Report, and a lot of the other stuff is run by other folks on the team.

    So, you’re the publisher of an empire.

    Well, I wouldn’t go so far as to call it an empire but, yes, it’s several sites (chuckle).

    How many people do you have writing for you?

    It comes and goes, and as for actual employed writers, again these guys sort of make their own money through ad code. So I don’t say, ‘Hey, you have to write 10 stories this week’ and this and that. Really, we have a more free-form idea where people, when their creativity strikes them, then they can write something. And if they’re in a slump then they just go dormant for a while. With that said, at any given time there’s probably 20, 25 contributors all over the country. …

    Talk about the Denver Guardian.

    Well, it’s kind of as a side project. We have some people working on next steps in the fake news industry, and that came from that whole discussion. We had purchased several domain names that sounded legitimate. … More local news sort of stories. The idea was to make the sites look as legit as possible so the home page is going to be local news and local forecast, local sports, some obituaries and things of that nature, and then the actual fake news stories were going to be buried off the homepage.

    We’ve tried lots of things in the past. The dot-com dot co domains were something I toyed in for a while. Those I quickly got away from because you don’t get away long with borrowing someone’s copyright or trademark. That was something that worked very well from a fake news perspective. People were fooled into the domain name, but that wasn’t so much what we were after. So again, the next step was to go after more city-type sites. And the Denver Guardian was one of those sites.

    You’re talking about the future of this (fake news business), which looks more insidious because it’s more real?

    That’s the way that it’s going to be. Not just from where I am. I mean this is probably going to be my last run in the fake news biz, but I can promise you that it’s not going to go away. It’s even going to grow bigger and it’s going to be harder to identify as it kind of evolves through these steps. …

    Do you know who wrote the actual FBI Clinton story?

    I do know who wrote the story, but only through an anonymous pen name. Privacy is something that we take very seriously in our writers’ group. The actual reasonings behind that story … it’s one of hundreds that have been written about mysterious deaths of Clinton associates or political foes. This one kind of took off more than others, I believe, just because of the nature of the story. The people wanted to hear this. So all it took was to write that story. Everything about it was fictional. The town, the people, the sheriff, the FBI guy. Then, we had our social media guys kind of go out and do a little dropping it throughout Trump groups and Trump forums, and boy it spread like wildfire.

    Why hide your identity?

    This isn’t the safest business to be in, to be honest. Just the number of death threats I’ve received. I have a beautiful family, a beautiful life.
    Some of these people that we … bait is probably the right word — are often — let’s call them the deplorables, right? They’re not the safest crowd. Some of them I would consider domestic terrorists. So they’re just not people that I want to be knocking on my door.

    It seems like National Report is getting spoofier.

    If you went to National Report today, it’s specifically satire. “Chris Christie nominated to Supreme Food Court.” “Sarah Palin Banning Muslims from Entering Bristol Palin.” They’re a little bit more offensive than some people care for their satire. I mean fat shaming and slut shaming isn’t something that is normally met with applause. But again, it’s a lot more fun in nature.

    Do you make serious money?

    It depends on what you would call serious money. I think I do pretty well.

    Can you say how well?

    I would rather not. There have been some people who have been reported on recently. The folks in Long Beach that were doing just all-right stuff. They were reporting $10,000 to $30,000 a month. I think that’s probably a relative ballpark.

    So you’re doing as well as those?

    Yes.

    You’re making money through the ads?

    Yes.

    Who do you work with?

    We have several advertisers. Google was one, although they shut down my account last week. We’ve replaced them with other advertisers.

    Can I ask who?

    There are literally hundreds of ad networks. Literally hundreds. Last week my inbox was just filled every day with people, because they knew that Google was cracking down — hundreds of people wanting to work with my sites. I kind of applaud Google for their steps, although I think what they’re doing is kind of random. They don’t really have a process in place for identifying these things. I happen to know a very successful site that, as of today, of this morning is still serving Google ads. So it seems to be a kind of arbitrary step that they’re taking either based on, I don’t know if it was my reputation within the industry or specifically the Denver Guardian site that angered them, or I don’t know what it is, but back to your question, there’s hundreds of people that will work with me.

    What can be done about fake news?

    Some of this has to fall on the readers themselves. The consumers of content have to be better at identifying this stuff. We have a whole nation of media-illiterate people. Really, there needs to be something done.

    Do you consider yourself an entrepreneur?

    Sure.

    Are you one of the biggest in the fake news biz?

    If you look at someone who has specifically sometimes peddled in fictional news, then I think that I would probably be considered one of the larger sites.

    As a liberal, do you have any regrets?

    I don’t. Again, this is something that I’ve been crying about for a while. But outside of that, there are many factors as to why Trump won that don’t involve fake news, right? As much as I like Hillary, she was a poor candidate. She brought in a lot of baggage.

    You don’t feel responsible.

    I do not.

    Do you think you would have kept doing it if it wasn’t so lucrative?

    Really the financial part of it isn’t the only motivator for me. I do enjoy making a mess of the people that share the content that comes out of our site. It’s not just the financial incentive for me. I still enjoy the game, I guess.

    Would you do this all over again?

    Well, I guess it came to a head here and we’re talking about it. It’ll be interesting to see what happens moving forward. If I had to, if I knew specifically the Denver Guardian situation, that would have been handled differently. But everything else, as far as the work I’ve done with National Report, I’m very proud of, and I’m going to continue doing it.

  15. #40
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^^ Coler says his writers have tried to write fake news for liberals — but they just never take the bait.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit
    Coler says his writers have tried to write fake news for liberals — but they just never take the bait.
    Indeed. I have been debunking this bugus news for a longtime know. Especially this past year since it has exploded. Older folk on facebook eat this stuff up as he says they love the red meat he throws them.

    From the iterview;

    When did you notice that fake news does best with Trump supporters?

    Well this isn’t just a Trump supporter problem. This is a right-wing issue. Sarah Palin’s famous blasting of the lame-stream media is kind of record and testament to the rise of these kinds of people. The post-fact era is what I would refer to it as. This isn’t something that started with Trump. This is something that’s been in the works for a while. His whole campaign was this thing of discrediting mainstream media sources, which is one of those dog whistles to his supporters. When we were coming up with headlines it’s always kind of about the red meat. Trump really got into the red meat. He knew who his base was. He knew how to feed them a constant diet of this red meat.

    We’ve tried to do similar things to liberals. It just has never worked, it never takes off. You’ll get debunked within the first two comments and then the whole thing just kind of fizzles out.








  17. #42
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub
    This is a right-wing issue.
    Bullshit. That's the trouble, neither side can ever admit that they're just as guilty as the other.

    That's why 'left' vs. 'right', (R) vs. (D) or 'liberal' vs. 'conservative' are meaningless to me. All those labels have nothing to do anymore with their original meanings.

    I see things more as right vs. wrong. IMO both sides are wrong more often then they're right.

  18. #43
    Molecular Mixup
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    Who cares what the Ctrl-Alt-Left think

    Fake news in the mainstream- eg look at the crap made up stories they put out about Global Warming

  19. #44
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    .. ^ Says the science denying, knuckle dragging forum retard.

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    ^douchebag. AJ is a Milton William Cooper wannabe...sadly he wouldn't make a good pimple on MWC's ass.


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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme View Post

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    Excellent questions raised by Mr. Blum in this article:

    Official Washington's 'Info-Wars'

    KIRBY: I’m sorry, but I’m not going to put Russia Today on the same level with the rest of you who are representing independent media outlets.

    One has to wonder if State Department spokesperson Kirby knows that in 2011 Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, speaking about RT, declared: “The Russians have opened an English-language network. I’ve seen it in a few countries, and it is quite instructive.”

    I also wonder how Mr. Kirby deals with reporters from the BBC, a STATE-OWNED television and radio entity in the U.K., broadcasting in the U.S. and all around the world.

    Or the state-owned Australian Broadcasting Corporation, described by Wikipedia as follows: “The corporation provides television, radio, online and mobile services throughout metropolitan and regional Australia, as well as overseas… and is well regarded for quality and reliability as well as for offering educational and cultural programming that the commercial sector would be unlikely to supply on its own.”

    There’s also Radio Free Europe, Radio Free Asia, Radio Liberty (Central/Eastern Europe), and Radio Marti (Cuba); all (U.S.) state-owned, none “independent”, but all deemed worthy enough by the United States to feed to the world.

    And let’s not forget what Americans have at home: PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) and NPR (National Public Radio), which would have a near-impossible time surviving without large federal government grants. How independent does this leave them? Has either broadcaster ever unequivocally opposed a modern American war? There’s good reason NPR has long been known as National Pentagon Radio. But it’s part of American media’s ideology to pretend that it doesn’t have any ideology.

    As to the non-state American media … There are about 1,400 daily newspapers in the United States. Can you name a single paper, or a single TV network, that was unequivocally opposed to the American wars carried out against Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Yugoslavia, Panama, Grenada, and Vietnam while they were happening, or shortly thereafter? Or even opposed to any two of these seven wars? How about one?

    In 1968, six years into the Vietnam War, the Boston Globe (Feb. 18, 1968) surveyed the editorial positions of 39 leading U.S. papers concerning the war and found that “none advocated a pull-out.” Has the phrase “invasion of Vietnam” ever appeared in the U.S. mainstream media?
    In 2003, leading cable station MSNBC took the much-admired Phil Donahue off the air because of his opposition to the calls for war in Iraq. Mr. Kirby would undoubtedly call MSNBC “independent.”

    If the American mainstream media were officially state-controlled, would they look or sound significantly different when it comes to U.S. foreign policy?
    full article at the link

  24. #49
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    Pizzagate: Man opens fire in Washington restaurant

    A man who said he was investigating a conspiracy theory about Hillary Clinton running a child sex ring out of a pizza place has fired an assault rifle inside a Washington, DC, restaurant injuring no one, police and news reports said.


    Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman Aquita Brown said police received a call on Sunday afternoon about a male with a weapon on Connecticut Avenue.
    Edgar Maddison Welch, 28, of Salisbury, North Carolina, walked into Comet Ping Pong and pointed a firearm in the direction of a restaurant employee, the Washington Post reported.



    The employee was able to flee and notify police. Welch then fired the gun into the floor.


    Police responded and arrested Welch without incident. They recovered an "assault rifle", Brown said. Welch was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon.
    Two firearms were recovered inside the restaurant and an additional weapon was recovered from the suspect's vehicle, police said in a statement on Sunday evening.


    The Comet Ping Pong restaurant gained notoriety during the 2016 US presidential campaign after fake news stories stated that Clinton and her campaign chief ran a child sex ring out of the restaurant.


    As the story spread online, fanned by right-leaning conspiracy theorists on discussion sites 4chan and Reddit, the restaurant owner received hundreds of threatening messages about the alleged scandal, dubbed "Pizzagate".
    Welch told police he had come to the restaurant to "self-investigate" the matter, the police statement said.


    The Comet, its owner, staff and nearby businesses have been caught up in the onslaught of conspiracy theories, and many have fallen victim to social media attacks and death threats, the Post reported.


    While police initially said the incident did not appear to be related to the threats, business owners and residents told the Post they believed it was related to "Pizzagate".


    Fake news stories and threats connected to November's presidential elections have forced the Comet's owner to contact local police, the FBI, and Facebook in an effort to remove slanderous articles.



    "There will be a time and a place to address how and why this happened in greater detail but for now I will simply say we should all condemn the efforts of some people to spread malicious and utterly false accusations about Comet Ping Pong," Comet owner James Alefantis told WUSA-TV.


    Pizzagate: Man opens fire in Washington restaurant | News | Al Jazeera

  25. #50
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    I'll put this under 'Fake News.'

    Coming from, once again, CNN
    .


    Fallout 4 computers used to depict "Russian hacking" on CNN

    By Shaun Prescott

    Even though Fallout 4 computers aren't even online.

    It'd be pretty hard for the Russians to hack America using the computers in Fallout 4. For one, the computers in Fallout 4 are not connected to the internet: in Bethesda's alternative history, America never makes it that far into the future. Another obstacle stopping Russia from hacking America via the computers in Fallout 4 is that, no matter how you approach it, it'd simply be impossible.

    That hasn't stopped CNN using footage of a Fallout 4 computer in a story about Russian hacking, though. It's not a huge faux pas on the news outlet's part: it's simply used as B-Roll footage, after all. But it's still pretty amusing, especially in light of how often TV news co-opts video game footage. A recent example includes ITV passing Arma 2 footage off as real.

    Spotted by vigilant redditor Poofylicious, the CNN footage aired on December 28, and can be seen at about the one minute mark in the first video over here.

    Fallout 4 computers used to depict 'Russian hacking' on CNN | PC Gamer

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