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  1. #12726
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    You consider Trump a high IQ individual? On what basis?

    Where did I say I considered Trump's IQ high or anything else,I was only pointing out one could look at the requirements of the Wharton school and the fact that Trump was accepted and graduated from Wharton and get some idea of his IQ,that's it,other than that I personally never indicated I consider anything about Trumps IQ,low or high. Quit trying to imply what I am saying.

  2. #12727
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Repeater666 is one on of the biggest idiots on this forum. He can barely read and write. He is incapable of judging anyone's intelligence.
    According to one who stays up all night trying to drink himself to sleep.

  3. #12728
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPETER65 View Post
    I was only pointing out one could look at the requirements of the Wharton school and the fact that Trump was accepted and graduated from Wharton and get some idea of his IQ
    Quote Originally Posted by RPETER65 View Post
    Quit trying to imply what I am saying.
    He doesn't have to imply anything you already did that for him. The first quote of yours above is doing just that. Your stupidity is limitless.

  4. #12729
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    He doesn't have to imply anything you already did that for him. The first quote of yours above is doing just that. Your stupidity is limitless.
    It does not it only states that he was accepted into and graduated from Wharton a high demand school,but read into it what you must .

  5. #12730
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    For his own good Trump should avoid Hannity. His bizarre answer on the debt shows why

    There’s a simple reason that President Trump is happy to sit down for a televised interview with Fox News’s Sean Hannity. Hannity is the embodiment of everything that Donald Trump says the rest of the media is: biased, sloppy and eager to embrace untrue stories. It’s just that Hannity’s on Trump’s team — explicitly and enthusiastically — so Trump sees Hannity’s journalistic failures instead as examples of how it should be done.

    The result is cognitively dissonant tweets like these, back-to-back, which to Trump (and Hannity) don’t seem dissonant at all.

    Trump sits down with Hannity because it allows him to say entirely egregious things — deliberate misstatements, long debunked falsehoods and incoherent arguments — with impunity. The most recent iteration of Hannity interviewing Trump aired on Wednesday night, and featured multiple examples of all three of the patterns above. Hannity, who both endorsed and advised Trump during the campaign, didn’t hold Trump to account journalistically (in part because he’s deliberate about insisting that he’s not a journalist). Instead, it was like that scene in the movie “Ghost,” with Hannity helping to shape the lumps of clay that Trump was offering to the audience into small objects that his audience would recognize and appreciate.

    The interview was conducted in Pennsylvania, where Trump had traveled to pitch his tax plan. So Hannity opened with a question about the economy, and by “question,” we mean that he repeated almost verbatim a Trump tweet about the stock market and then let Trump respond to it.

    This was Trump’s response.
    The country — we took it over and owed over 20 trillion. As you know the last eight years, they borrowed more than it did in the whole history of our country. So they borrowed more than $10 trillion, right? And yet, we picked up 5.2 trillion just in the stock market.

    Possibly picked up the whole thing in terms of the first nine months, in terms of value. So you could say, in one sense, we’re really increasing values. And maybe in a sense we’re reducing debt. But we’re very honored by it. And we’re very, very happy with what’s happening on Wall Street.

    Obviously, growth in the stock market has no direct relationship to a decline in the national debt. One is an increase in value for shareholders, the other is money owed by the government. Economic growth, as Trump has pointed out in the past, can help pay down the debt indirectly by increasing the amount of revenue the government earns — but that’s not what Trump’s saying. He’s saying: President Barack Obama increased debt by $10 trillion and we picked up $5 trillion on the market and that, therefore, “maybe in a sense we’re reducing debt.”

    Hannity’s response? He changed the subject, apparently considering that question (such as it was) answered.

    What’s remarkable is that this is a disservice to Trump. An actual journalist might have pressed the president on the question: Are you saying that the market increase is related to the debt? How? That would have prompted clarity from Trump that would have almost certainly made his comments seem less odd. But Hannity, uninterested in pressing Trump at all, let it be.

    The rest of the interview continued in this pattern. Hannity would raise a subject about which Trump could say something flattering to his administration and Trump would say that flattering thing, often relying on debunked material to do so.

    Here are questions Hannity asked about Trump’s tax plan.

    “There’s no two accountants that can give you the same liability to the government if you give them the same information. That’s how complicated the tax code is. You want to drop seven brackets to three?”

    “You said the corporate rate, which is so important, you said 20 percent is your max.

    “The top 10 percent pays 70 percent of the tax bill. The bottom 50 percent pay 2 of the total income tax rate.”

    “There are multinational corporations that have parked trillions of dollars in countries that offer them better tax relief. You’re trying to incentive those trillions to come back here with a lower repatriation rate. How low will that be? And how much do you think you can bring back into the United States?”

    “If you live in a state like New York, or Illinois, and New Jersey, or California you won’t be able to deduct your local or state income tax. In other words, if you elect politicians that want to raise taxes, you’re going to pay the penalty. So that’s not really true that this is a tax cut for the wealthy, as they’re portraying it. What is your answer to that?”

    You get the gist. Hannity didn’t just let Trump preach to the Fox News choir, he also built the church, wrote the liturgy and held the megaphone to Trump’s lips. No questions pressing Trump on estimates that show increases for some middle-income families. No question about how repatriating corporate profits would actually help the economy. Just picking up the softball and putting it back on the tee.

    And this was just the section on the economy. The interview amounted to a Trump rally speech with Hannity serving the role of the teleprompter from which the president could start to riff. Trump talked about helping nonwhite Americans through his typical lens of crime in the inner cities (including repeating a debunked story about meeting a cop in Chicago). He talked about how Russian meddling in the 2016 election was an excuse the Democrats ginned up after Hillary Clinton lost (despite the government alerting states about possible meddling last October). He talked about how awful the protests in the NFL were, his current hobbyhorse.

    Trump talked about how bad the Iran deal was, after Hannity raised it.


    HANNITY: Bill Clinton, when he made the deal with Kim Jong Un’s father, Kim Jong Il, he actually said that this is a good deal for the American people. It was not. It seems the same mistake was made with President Obama and the Iranian deal. There’s reports you will decertify this — you can also pull out of it. [Former U.N. ambassador and Fox News contributor] John Bolton’s suggesting you just pull out completely. Why decertify, and not just scrap it?

    TRUMP: Well, you can do both, to be honest with you.

    HANNITY: Or do both?

    This was Hannity actually pressing on something: Why not dump this thing you keep saying you hate? It’s a tricky issue that’s flustering Trump, as The Washington Post reported this week.

    Trump responds, I could do both those things. At which point Hannity tries to slip that in as one of the original options in his question.

    Again, this is all a disservice to the president. He hates to be challenged, clearly, and finds critical coverage frustrating. But there’s a reason that critical coverage is protected by the First Amendment (also to Trump’s apparent frustration): It leads to improvement. It leads to better answers from the president, it expands the way in which he understands issues and it forces him to be more clear on what he plans to do and how he wants to do it. That’s to his benefit, as well as the country’s.

    Instead we get this.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.147234b95078
    Last edited by bsnub; 13-10-2017 at 10:24 AM.

  6. #12731
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    The country — we took it over and owed over 20 trillion. As you know the last eight years, they borrowed more than it did in the whole history of our country. So they borrowed more than $10 trillion, right? And yet, we picked up 5.2 trillion just in the stock market.

    Possibly picked up the whole thing in terms of the first nine months, in terms of value. So you could say, in one sense, we’re really increasing values. And maybe in a sense we’re reducing debt. But we’re very honored by it. And we’re very, very happy with what’s happening on Wall Street.

    ffs...

  7. #12732
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncle junior View Post
    ffs...
    I'd pick a fucking kid over orange cunto in an IQ test.


  8. #12733
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPETER65 View Post
    It does not it only states that he was accepted into and graduated from Wharton a high demand school,but read into it what you must .
    You're assuming that he was accepted on the basis of his IQ.

  9. #12734
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    Meanwhile orange cunto is determined to sabotage peoples healthcare.

    If he thought his ratings were shit now, just wait!



    The White House dropped a late night bombshell on Thursday, announcing it could no longer lawfully pay subsidies to health insurance companies under Obamacare, attracting immediate protests from Democratic opponents who accuse Donald Trump of sabotage.

    The announcement was made hours after Mr Trump signed an executive order unravelling other key provisions of the Affordable Care Act by allowing insurance companies to offer cheaper packages with less complete coverage.
    Taken together, they show a President frustrated by efforts to move legislation through Congress deciding to go it alone in dismantling Barack Obama’s signature policy.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017...sidies-latest/

  10. #12735
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    awesome, at least he is doing something

  11. #12736
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    You're assuming that he was accepted on the basis of his IQ.
    What ever,as I said you can read what ever you like into it,not worth having a fight over.

  12. #12737
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPETER65 View Post
    What ever,as I said you can read what ever you like into it,not worth having a fight over.
    What's to read?

    You say it's a good school.

    Everyone else knows he's a fucking idiot.

    I had two twins as schoolmates who were as dumb as fucking rocks; the only reason they were allowed to remain (and redo their exam year) was because daddy built the school a new Music hall and teaching centre.

  13. #12738
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    ...waiting for Republican legislators to grow a spine:

    Sinister figures lurk around our careless president




    Trump administration senior adviser Stephen Miller at the White House. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

    By George F. Will
    Opinion writer October 13 at 8:10 PM


    With eyes wide open, Mike Pence eagerly auditioned for the role as Donald Trump’s poodle. Now comfortably leashed, he deserves the degradations that he seems too sycophantic to recognize as such. He did Trump’s adolescent bidding with last Sunday’s preplanned virtue pageantof scripted indignation — his flight from the predictable sight of players kneeling during the national anthem at a football game. No unblinkered observer can still cling to the hope that Pence has the inclination, never mind the capacity, to restrain, never mind educate, the man who elevated him to his current glory. Pence is a reminder that no one can have sustained transactions with Trump without becoming too soiled for subsequent scrubbing.
    A man who interviewed for the position Pence captured, Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), is making amends for saying supportive things about Trump. In 2016, for example, he said he was “repulsed” by people trying to transform the Republican National Convention from a merely ratifying body into a deliberative body for the purpose of preventing what has come to pass. Until recently, Corker, an admirable man and talented legislator, has been, like many other people, prevented by his normality from fathoming Trump’s abnormality. Now Corker says what could have been said two years ago about Trump’s unfitness.
    The axiom that “Hell is truth seen too late” is mistaken; damnation deservedly comes to those who tardily speak truth that has long been patent. Perhaps there shall be a bedraggled parade of repentant Republicans resembling those supine American communists who, after Stalin imposed totalitarianism, spawned the gulag, engineered the Ukraine famine, launched the Great Terror and orchestrated the show trials, were theatrically disillusioned by his collaboration with Hitler: You, sir, have gone too far.


    Trump’s energy, unleavened by intellect and untethered to principle, serves only his sovereign instinct to pander to those who adore him as much as he does. Unshakably smitten, they are impervious to the Everest of evidence that he disdains them as a basket of gullibles. He understands that his unremitting coarseness satisfies their unpolitical agenda of smashing crockery, even though his self-indulgent floundering precludes fulfillment of the promises he flippantly made to assuage their sense of being disdained. He gives his gullibles not governance by tantrum, but tantrum as governance.
    With Trump turning and turning in a widening gyre, his crusade to make America great again is increasingly dominated by people who explicitly repudiate America’s premises. The faux nationalists of the “alt-right” and their fellow travelers such as Stephen K. Bannon, although fixated on protecting the United States from imported goods, have imported the blood-and-soil ethno-tribalism that stains the continental European right. In “Answering the Alt-Right” in National Affairs quarterly, Ramon Lopez, a University of Chicago PhD candidate in political philosophy, demonstrates how Trump’s election has brought back to the public stage ideas that a post-Lincoln America had slowly but determinedly expunged. They were rejected because they are incompatible with an open society that takes its bearing from the Declaration of Independence’s doctrine of natural rights.


    With their version of the identity politics practiced by progressives, alt-right theorists hold that the tribalism to which people are prone should not be transcended but celebrated. As Lopez explains, the alt-right sees society as inevitably “a zero-sum contest among fundamentally competing identity groups.” Hence the alt-right is explicitly an alternative to Lincoln’s affirmation of the Founders’ vision. They saw America as cohesive because of a shared creed. The alt-right must regard Lincoln as not merely mistaken but absurd in describing America as a creedal nation dedicated to a “proposition.” The alt-right insists that real nationhood requires cultural homogeneity rooted in durable ethnic identities. This is the alt-right’s alternative foundation for the nation Lincoln said was founded on the principle that all people are, by nature, equal.

    Trump is, of course, innocent of this (or any other) systemic thinking. However, within the ambit of his vast, brutish carelessness are some people with sinister agendas and anti-constitutional impulses. Stephen Miller, Bannon’s White House residue and Trump’s enfant terrible,recently said that “in sending our [tax reform] proposal to the tax-writing committees, we will include instructions to ensure all low- and middle-income households are protected.” So, Congress will be instructed by Trump’s 32-year-old acolyte who also says the president’s national security powers “will not be questioned.” We await the response of congressional Republicans, who did so little to stop Trump’s ascent and then so much to normalize him.

    Last edited by tomcat; 14-10-2017 at 08:30 AM.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  14. #12739
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    He's highly educated with a huge general knowledge base (sarcasm).
    His latest display of his good knowledge of everything was his statement that he met with the President of The Virgin Islands.
    Was that when he was shaving?
    In this recording, there's a wonderful Freudian slip when he says he loves what the people of Puerto Rico have gone through.

    President Trump Doesn?t Know He?s the President of the U.S. Virgin Islands

  15. #12740
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    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...ecutive-orders

    Dismantling Obamacare: what has Trump done and who will it affect?



    Donald Trump took two extraordinary steps to undo his predecessor’s signature health law on Thursday, measures that could fatally damage Obamacare despite the repeated failure of Republicans in Congress to repeal it.
    Having expanded access to cheaper and less comprehensive insurance – which experts predict will result in health plans for the sick becoming more expensive – with an executive order on Thursday morning, the president issued a surprise notice that night scrapping federal subsidies underpinning the system.
    Trump’s actions could undermine the health marketplace millions of Americans depend on and hurt some of the US’s most vulnerable people. The president spent much of his campaign issuing vague promises to replace Barack Obama’s health law – which expanded coverage to nearly 20 million people – and he has been frustrated by his fellow Republicans’ inability to coalesce around a plan to do so.
    What exactly did Trump do?

    Unlike most developed countries, the US does not have a national health system, and since Americans have the most expensive system in the world, even a hospital trip can be financially ruinous. This is why health insurance is such a necessity.
    Most Americans get insurance one of three ways: through government programs for the poor and elderly called Medicaid and Medicare, through their employer, or through the online marketplaces set up by Obama’s Affordable Care Act in 2010.
    It is those online marketplaces that Trump’s moves this week will affect.
    The group using the marketplaces is dominated by small business owners and the self-employed. Marketplace plans are tightly regulated with a standard set of benefits, including maternity care, mental healthcare, and prescription drugs.
    On Thursday, Trump changed that system in two ways.
    First, he signed an executive order to allow health insurers to sell loosely regulated, cheap plans outside the marketplaces. These are called “association health plans”, and are based on the idea that small businesses should band together to get better rates from insurance companies.
    Conservatives say this turns health insurance into what it should be: a “financial product” meant for emergencies and designed for the middle class.
    Progressive groups have called these plans “junk”, because they are likely to have few benefits, and may not cover people when they need it most.
    Second, Trump decided not to fund the subsidies the government gives insurance companies under Obamacare to make health insurance less expensive for low-income people. These are called “cost-sharing reductions”. To accomplish this, all Trump had to do was make an announcement, because a court ruled the subsidies illegal just before the Obama administration left office, before it had time to appeal.
    Why did he do this?

    For seven years Republicans campaigned against the ACA, which they consider unwarranted government intrusion into a private industry, and for an end to mandated high-priced insurance plans.
    However, after gaining control of the presidency, House and Senate at the 2016 election, they could not agree on how to repeal or replace the law.
    Killing Obamacare would have left more than 20 million Americans without health insurance, a prospect which sparked uproar. Public approval of alternative Republican health plans hovered at around 20%. And Republicans suffered one embarrassing failure after another when they tried to pass the bills through Congress.
    As Trump demanded Obamacare’s repeal, he also insisted it was imploding. “Let Obamacare fail and it will be a lot easier,” Trump said after one failed legislative attempt this summer.
    Characterizing the subsidies that help the poor a “bailout” for insurers, and skimpy health plans a solution to the Obamacare “nightmare”, he has now made that implosion a lot more likely.
    Who will this affect?

    The poor, the sick, older Americans, women and possibly small business owners will all be affected by Trump’s moves, according to doctors. About 12.7 million people rely on health insurance marketplaces created by Obamacare.
    A joint statement from six physicians’ groups said Trump’s executive order on low-cost plans would probably “cause significant economic harm to women and older, sicker Americans who stand to face higher-cost and fewer insurance options”.
    Democrats said the actions could cause serious, structural damage to American healthcare. Democratic congressional leaders Senator Chuck Schumer and Representative Nancy Pelosi called his actions a, “spiteful act of vast, pointless sabotage”, in a joint statement.
    And the Republican senator Susan Collins, whose vote helped doom Republican repeal plans, said she was “very concerned” that Trump had ended “an important subsidy that helps very low income people”.
    Will Obamacare survive?

    The problem with both Trump’s ideas is they damage the ACA’s foundational concept: if the costs of the sick are spread among the healthy, insurance is cheaper for everyone when they ultimately need it.
    But allowing “junk” plans and ending subsidies to the poor, Trump may have set in motion a “death spiral”, or an exodus of the healthy from marketplaces, concentrating costs among the sick.
    For example, when health insurance becomes too expensive for poor people, they go without insurance. And if small business owners can buy association plans with skimpy benefits, they may also leave marketplace plans behind. That means fewer people to spread the risk to, which causes prices to rise, which causes more people to leave the markets – hence, a spiral.
    Whether marketplace plans, and the comprehensive benefits they provide, can survive Trump’s decisions is an open question.
    Most insurers are probably committed to selling insurance in 2018 and have set their rates. Trump changing the rules in the middle of the game could mean they lose money. Next time they may simply refuse to play.
    Will Trump be blamed if people lose health coverage?

    The president is sure he won’t. “We’re not going to own it,” he said in July. “I’m not going to own it. I can tell you the Republicans are not going to own it.” Earlier this week he told Forbes: “I’ve always said Obamacare is Obama’s fault. It’s never going to be our fault.”
    The public seems to disagree. A recent poll showed 60% think Trump and the Republicans, not Obama and the Democrats, are responsible for the ACA’s success or failure.
    “Trump will try to blame the ACA, but this will fall on his back and he will pay the price for it,” Schumer and Pelosi predicted in their joint statement.
    Trump himself seemed to imply his moves – which are likely to face legal challenge – may have been brinksmanship intended to force Democrats to the table. “The Democrats [sic] ObamaCare is imploding,” he wrote on Twitter. “Massive subsidy payments to their pet insurance companies has stopped. Dems should call me to fix!”


    I remember reading something somewhere about the astronomical costs of healthcare in the U.S. something like 5000 dollars for a cat scan for example. I put it down to the insurance companies .

    "In my professional assessment as an intelligence officer, Trump has a reflexive, defensive, monumentally narcissistic personality, for whom the facts and national interest are irrelevant, and the only thing that counts is whatever gives personal advantage and directs attention to himself."

  16. #12741
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    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Former Wharton Professor: "Donald Trump Was the Dumbest Goddam Student I Ever Had."

    Late Professor William T. Kelley taught Marketing at Wharton School of Business and Finance, University of Pennsylvania, for 31 years, ending with his retirement in 1982. Dr. Kelley, who also had vast experience as a business consultant, was the author of a then-widely used textbook called Marketing Intelligence -- The Management of Marketing Information (originally published by P. Staples, London, 1968). Dr. Kelley taught marketing management to both undergraduate and graduate students at Wharton. www.upenn.edu/… Dr. Bill was one of my closest friends for 47 years when we lost him at 94 about six years ago. Bill would have been 100 this year.

    Donald J. Trump was an undergraduate student at Wharton for the latter two of his college years, having been graduated in 1968. www.thedp.com/

    Professor Kelley told me 100 times over three decades that “Donald Trump was the dumbest goddam student I ever had.” I remember his emphasis and inflection — it went like this — “Donald Trump was the dumbest goddam student I ever had.” Dr. Kelley told me this after Trump had become a celebrity but long before he was considered a political figure. Dr. Kelley often referred to Trump’s arrogance when he told of this — that Trump came to Wharton thinking he already knew everything.

    This has relevance now because as recently as this week, President Trump has challenged the Secretary of State of the United States to an I.Q. contest. www.washingtonpost.com/… This came within two days after NBC reported that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called the President a “moron” www.nbcnews.com/… or a “fucking moron” www.slate.com/… The President has frequently bragged that he was a great student at a great school (Wharton). time.com/… Thus, the public is entitled to a contrary view from somebody who was there (Dr. Kelley), and I faithfully report it here.

    Bill Kelley was one smart cookie. His text book cited above — published in the late 1960s — was standard in his time in the then-new field of “marketing intelligence” and the necessity of using computers and data bases to manage it. See onlinelibrary.wiley.com/... which credits Bill for coining the quoted phrase.

    Dr. Kelley’s view seems to be shared by other University of Pennsylvanians. Please see www.thedp.com/…, from the Daily Pennsylvanian, stating:

    Another biographer, Gwenda Blair, wrote in 2001 that Trump was admitted to Wharton on a special favor from a “friendly” admissions officer. The officer had known Trump’s older brother, Freddy.

    Trump’s classmates doubt that the real estate mogul was an academic powerhouse.

    “He was not in any kind of leadership. I certainly doubt he was the smartest guy in the class,” said Steve Perelman, a 1968 Wharton classmate and a former Daily Pennsylvanian news editor.

    Some classmates speculated that Trump skipped class, others that he commuted to New York on weekends. . . .

    * * *

    1968 Wharton graduate Louis Calomaris recalled that “Don ... was loath to really study much.”

    Calomaris said Trump would come to study groups unprepared and did not “seem to care about being prepared.”

    Thanks and R.I.P., Bill Kelley! The words ring in my ears: “Donald Trump was the dumbest goddam student I ever had.”

    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/201...ent-I-Ever-Had

  18. #12743
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    ^Hard to respect a teacher that would openly bad mouth his students....even if he is right.

  19. #12744
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncle junior View Post
    ^Hard to respect a teacher that would openly bad mouth his students....even if he is right.
    He didn't openly bad mouth him.

    He told one of his "closest friends".

    As the saying goes: I can keep a secret, it's the people I tell that can't.

  20. #12745
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    He didn't openly bad mouth him.

    He told one of his "closest friends".
    Exactly and teachers say lots of things about their students in the break room.
    Last edited by bsnub; 15-10-2017 at 02:07 PM.

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    This is Trump related if only for it's chilling message. There's an analogy here somewhere.
    http://www.theatlantic.com/video/ind...utm_source=fbb

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    and how is that fucking relevant what some teacher think of a student ?

    didn't realize you needed a marketing degree to run as president ?
    Last edited by Dragonfly; 15-10-2017 at 03:27 PM.

  23. #12748
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    ^ STFU buttplug. Go watch some ladyboy porn.

  24. #12749
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    ^ STFU buttplug. Go watch some ladyboy porn.
    go play with your own cock, you silly boy

  25. #12750
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    'He is failing': Trump strikes out solo as friends worry and enemies circle



    Donald Trump’s decision to go it alone with rapid fire announcements on healthcare and Iran reflects his boiling frustration with the limits of presidential power, analysts say.
    The US president made a brazen move on Thursday night to halt payments to insurers under Barack Obama’s healthcare law. Democrats accused him of a “temper tantrum” and spiteful attempt to sabotage legislation he promised but failed to replace. Less than 24 hours later, he condemned the “fanatical” government of Iran as he decertified his predecessor’s nuclear deal, defying his own cabinet and disquieting European allies.
    The one-two punch showed Trump straining to assail Obama’s legacy but stopping short of terminating either the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare, or the Iran nuclear accord. Both are back in the hands of Congress, a source of constant exasperation for the property tycoon turned novice politician, who finds himself isolated and lashing out.
    “The Congress has been frustrating to him,” John Kelly, the White House chief of staff, told reporters on Thursday. “Of course, our government is designed to be slow, and it is. His sense, I think, as a man who is outside the Washington arena, a businessman, much more of a man of action, I would say his great frustration is the process that he now finds himself [in].
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    “Because, in his view, the solutions are obvious, whether it’s tax cuts and tax reform, healthcare, infrastructure programmes, strengthening our military. To him, these all seem like obvious things that need to be done to protect the American people, bring jobs back.”
    Since taking office 10 months ago as the first US president with no previous political or military experience, Trump has been given a crash course in the workings of government and the delicate balance of power between the White House, Capitol Hill and the courts. That his writ only runs so far has come as a rude awakening. His executive orders can only achieve so much, and frustrations have sometimes spilled out in impetuous speeches and tweets.
    Rick Tyler, a political analyst and partner at Foundry Strategies, said: “He is acutely aware of the limits of presidential power. It’s not like being the CEO of a company where you just do what you want to do.
    “By using executive orders, Trump is making something happen on healthcare. He’s prevented from changing it himself, but will force another branch of power to react. It’s the same on Iran.”
    Having repeatedly vented his anger at the Republican-controlled Senate for failing to repeal and replace Obamacare, despite seven years of promises, Trump has now thrown a spanner in the works by ending the so-called cost-sharing subsidies that help people on low incomes. The White House claims the government cannot legally continue to pay the subsidies because it lacks formal authorisation by Congress.




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    Donald Trump has responded by his inability to govern as he likes by throwing red meat to his base. Photograph: Yuri Gripas/Reuters
    The president explained on Friday: “It’s step by step by step and that was a very big step yesterday … We’re going to have great healthcare in our country. We’re taking a little different route than we had hoped, because Congress forgot what their pledges were. So we’re going a little different route. But you know what? In the end, it’s going to be just as effective, and maybe it will even be better.”
    The intervention, however, could backfire. It was condemned by Democrats including the House minority leader, Nancy Pelosi, who told reporters: “The president single-handedly decided to raise America’s health premiums for no reason other than spite and cruelty.” Senator Chris Murphy tweeted: “Trump’s decision to stop ACA payments is nuclear grade bananas, a temper tantrum that sets the entire health system on fire. My god.”
    Doctors’ groups also warned of “dramatic, if not catastrophic, increases in premiums across the country” and millions of Americans losing coverage. Nineteen states plan to sue.
    Trump has previously blamed the lack of healthcare fixes on Obama or Congress, but he now he risks being held personally responsible for cutting the system off at the knees. Robert Shrum, a Democratic consultant, said: “The healthcare thing is madness in both policy and politics. He’s wilful, he’s angry, he’s clearly lashing out. He was better off leaving healthcare to Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray”, the senators working on a bipartisan deal.
    Trump’s decision to stop ACA payments is nuclear grade bananas ... that sets the entire health system on fire. My god
    Senator Chris Murphy
    Trump’s claim that Iran has not lived up to the spirit of the nuclear deal and his threat to terminate it also put him at odds with his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, and his defence secretary, Jim Mattis. The Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, said he welcomed what he called a courageous decision, but the leaders of Britain, France and Germany said they stood committed to the agreement.
    Evan McMullin, a former CIA operative and independent presidential candidate, wrote via email: “I think the president’s actions on healthcare and Iran are the latest examples of his standing political strategy, which is to throw red meat to his base in order to maintain his base, as evidence of his unfitness and inability to govern mounts.
    “If anything, his use of this tactic seems to be accelerating as it becomes increasingly clear, even to some of his closest friends and political allies, that he is failing.”
    This acceleration coincides with reports of a darkening in Trump’s mood. A report in Vanity Fair magazine, citing two sources, claimed he had vented to his longtime security chief, Keith Schiller: “I hate everyone in the White House! There are a few exceptions, but I hate them!”
    The journalist Gabriel Sherman also wrote that several people close to the president told him that Trump was unstable, “losing a step” and unraveling. Such concerns appear to be reaching a critical mass. NBC News reported that Tillerson had referred to Trump as a moron. The president insisted the story was false, but challenged Tillerson to an IQ contest.




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    Senator Bob Corker set off a political firestorm when he responded to tweeted attacks by Trump. Photograph: Shawn Thew/EPA
    Then Senator Bob Corker became one of the few Republicans on Capitol Hill to openly denounce Trump, though it is widely suspected that he speaks for many colleagues. During a Twitter clash last Sunday, Corker wrote: “It’s a shame the White House has become an adult day care center. Someone obviously missed their shift this morning.”
    In an interview with the New York Times, the senator from Tennessee said: “I know for a fact that every single day at the White House, it’s a situation of trying to contain him … He doesn’t realise that we could be heading towards world war three with the kind of comments that he’s making.”
    He also told the Washington Post on Friday that Trump had “castrated” Tillerson with remarks about his attempts to talk to North Korea.

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    Thomas Barrack Jr, a billionaire who was the top fundraiser for Trump’s election campaign, said he has been shocked and stunned by some of the president’s incendiary rhetoric and tweets.
    “He thinks he has to be loyal to his base,” Barrack told the Washington Post. “I keep on saying, ‘But who is your base? You don’t have a natural base. Your base now is the world and America, so you have all these constituencies; show them who you really are.’ In my opinion, he’s better than this.”
    If anyone can get through to Trump, it may be Barrack, one of his oldest friends. Rich Galen, a Republican strategist, said: “That got everybody’s attention because he’s buddy and spoke at the Republican convention. So there seems to be some change. That’s part of what’s feeding it.”
    McMullin agreed that Trump seemed rattled by the recent criticisms from Tillerson, Corker and Barrack. “He probably understands their remarks represent a new stage of acceptance setting in across the country, even among his supporters, that he is unfit and incapable.
    “That, I think, is inspiring his accelerated efforts to throw red meat to his base to shore up their support. I expect that to continue, if not intensify, and to result in increasing political challenges for the GOP as 2017 and 2018 elections approach and in years to come.”“That, I think, is inspiring his accelerated efforts to throw red meat to his base to shore up their support. I expect that to continue, if not intensify, and to result in increasing political challenges for the GOP as 2017 and 2018 elections approach and in years to come.”
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/oct/14/donald-trump-iran-healthcare-white-house-corker


    Donald Trump rallied the faithful on Friday in a speech that aimed to shore up support among religious conservatives as his popularity haemorrhages elsewhere.
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    Becoming the first sitting president to address the annual Values Voter Summit, Trump entered a ballroom at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington to applause, cheers and chants of “USA! USA!”
    He proceeded to cast himself as a man of God.
    “Everyone here today is brought together by the same shared and timeless values,” said the thrice-married socialite and reality TV star who was once recorded bragging about grabbing women “by the pussy”, yet who gained strong backing from Christian evangelicals in last November’s election. “We cherish the sacred dignity of every human life.
    “We believe in strong families and safe communities. We honour the dignity of work. We defend our constitution. We protect religious liberty. We treasure our freedom, we are proud of our history, we support the rule of law and the incredible men and women of law enforcement. We celebrate our heroes and we salute every American who wears the uniform. We respect our great American flag.”
    This last point brought conference delegates to their feet amid whoops and whistles, making clear where their sympathies lie in the dispute between Trump and football players who “take a knee” during the national anthem in protest over racial injustice and police brutality.
    The president hit further applause lines in a room that had earlier been treated to a speaker wearing an industrial apron in order to “drain the swamp” and an unflattering photo of Hillary Clinton shown for the purpose of mockery. A panel featuring three Republican members of Congress had praised Trump’s attempt to ban transgender people in the military and urged tougher restrictions on abortion. The Values Voter summit is sponsored by the conservative Family Research Council.
    Trump was happy to embrace a siege mentality among some evangelicals who claim they are marginalised by liberal media and a Hollywood-dominated culture. The founders invoked “our creator” four times in the declaration of independence, he said. “How times have changed. But you know what? Now, they’re changing back again. Just remember that.”
    Since taking office in January “we have followed through on one promise after another,” Trump claimed. “I didn’t have a schedule, but if I did have a schedule I would say we are substantially ahead of schedule.”
    He has not passed any major legislation in that time but, he reminded the audience, he did nominate Neil Gorsuch to the supreme court, a conservative “in the mould” of Antonin Scalia who died in February 2016. The vacancy was a critical factor in the election for many religious conservatives, the need to prevent a Clinton nominee overriding concerns about Trump.
    The president insisted that he was “stopping cold” attacks on Judeo-Christian values and was determined to protect religious liberty. “We will not allow government workers to censor sermons or target our pastors, our ministers, our rabbis,” he said. “These are the people we want to hear from, and they’re not going to be silenced any longer.”
    He also declared an end to the “war on Christmas”, a favourite theme of conservative media outlets such as Fox News.
    “As we approach the end of the year, you know, we’re getting near that beautiful Christmas season that people don’t talk about any more. They don’t use the word ‘Christmas’ because it’s not politically correct. You go to department stores and they’ll say ‘Happy New Year’ and they’ll say other things. And it’ll be red, they’ll have it painted, but they don’t say – well, guess what? We’re saying ‘Merry Christmas’ again.”
    He mentioned his hope that Congress will give the American people a Christmas gift by passing his tax cut proposal but chided members over their failure to pass a healthcare bill, saying “they forgot what their pledges were”.
    Turning to foreign policy, Trump told the audience: “Above all else, we know this. In America we don’t worship government. We worship God. Inspired by that conviction, we are returning moral clarity to our view of the world and the many grave challenges we face.”

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    He again used the phrase “radical Islamic terrorism”, one that Barack Obama studiously avoided, to cheers and applause, and made the questionable assertion: “We’ve done more against Isis in nine months than the previous administration’s done during its whole administration – by far, by far.”
    Eight in 10 white evangelicals cast their vote for Trump last November, according to exit polls – a higher proportion than supported fellow Republicans George W Bush in 2004, John McCain in 2008 or Mitt Romney in 2012. The constituency is vital for Trump, whose approval has dipped even in red states such as Tennessee (-23 percentage points), Mississippi (-21) and Kentucky (-20), according to a Morning Consult survey published this week.
    Earlier in the speech, he paid tribute to victims of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, fires in California and hurricanes in Texas, Florida, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.
    But he mistakenly said he had spoken to “the president” of the Virgin Islands. The president of that US territory is Trump himself.
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/oct/13/trump-religious-conservative-values-voters-summit

    Those Christian evangelicals sure are fucking morons.

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