Page 103 of 123 FirstFirst ... 353939596979899100101102103104105106107108109110111113 ... LastLast
Results 2,551 to 2,575 of 3057
  1. #2551
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    Who's paying these shills... if any evidence was needed of the corporate hijacking of the US government, here it is.
    Weapons industries lobbyists blatantly behind the shills forcing foreign policy agenda.

    a 2nd American revolution can't come soon enough


  2. #2552
    CabbageSmeller Pursuivant
    Looper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:00 AM
    Posts
    10,347
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo
    Weapons manufacturers blatantly making foreign policy agenda.
    I watched the RT video clip but I must have missed the bit where they said anything about 'Weapons manufacturers making foreign policy'?


  3. #2553
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    Yeah, but you're not that bright.
    Go back to sleep Looper CNN's got it all figured out for you.

  4. #2554
    CabbageSmeller Pursuivant
    Looper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:00 AM
    Posts
    10,347
    Seriously Neo.

    Do you think that western arms manufacturers engage in Machiavellian bellicose lobbying to western governments to increase conflict and arms sales?

    You are living in a movie-script fantasy world.

    It does not happen.

    I have been involved in the acquisition process on several projects.

    When governments procure any materiel the acquisition process goes through very thorough vetting to make sure the tender is offered to all competing manufacturers on a level playing field. The evaluation and selection process is subject to stringent vetting to make sure that the purchase decision is based on value and all factors in the decision have to be accounted for and above board.

    There is no way that arms manufacturers engage in the behaviour you are suggesting in the west.

    They would be run out of the building and not allowed to return if they tried anything like this in a sales engagement with the department of defence.

    In less developed countries and regions perhaps this goes on to some extent.

  5. #2555
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Do you think that western arms manufacturers engage in Machiavellian bellicose lobbying to western governments to increase conflict and arms sales?

    You are living in a movie-script fantasy world.

    It does not happen.


    Poor Looper... lets hope the Prozac never wears off.

  6. #2556
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    There is no way that arms manufacturers engage in the behaviour you are suggesting in the west.
    I'm going to put you on ignore Looper.
    No offence, but you know what they say about arguing with idiots and I just don't have enough hours in the day.

    Keep living the dream

  7. #2557
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:17 AM
    Posts
    43,782
    Fucking hell, if we haven't got enough lunacy from HoHoHo and ENT, Neo wants to join the nutty c u n t s club as well.


  8. #2558
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    Hahaha yeah funny harry... so you're also saying that weapons manufacturers are not lobbying the US government, and that they have no influence over foreign policy..?


  9. #2559
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    off the reservation
    Posts
    2,144
    Yeah Neo, WTF are you smoking...

    SignOnSanDiego.com > News > Politics -- Lawmaker's home sale questioned

    WASHINGTON A defense contractor with ties to Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham took a $700,000 loss on the purchase of the congressman's Del Mar house while the congressman, a member of the influential defense appropriations subcommittee, was supporting the contractor's efforts to get tens of millions of dollars in contracts from the Pentagon
    full story at link

    related:

    SignOnSanDiego.com > News > Politics -- Contractor admits bribing Cunningham

    See Wiki on Cunningham under Scandals and Corruption: Allegations
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_Cunningham

    Cunningham got caught...how many don't?

  10. #2560
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:17 AM
    Posts
    43,782
    Talk about putting 2 + 2 together and getting 6....

  11. #2561
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    Hahaha yeah funny harry... so you're also saying that weapons manufacturers are not lobbying the US government, and that they have no influence over foreign policy..?

    You can't admit to what is common knowledge because your whole house of cards about Putin being the aggressor will come tumbling down.

    Keep on running from the truth harry


  12. #2562
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    A new US lobby group headed by defence ministry insiders has heightened concerns over the role of business interests in determining Washington’s foreign policy, as arms companies seek to boost foreign sales.

    Americans for Peace Prosperity and Security (APPS) is a new pressure group founded by former FBI agent Mike Rogers, who says he is pursuing a career in talk radio after stepping down from Congress in January.

    APPS was formed in the run-up to the presidential election of 2016 with the stated aim of helping to “elect a president who supports American engagement and a strong foreign policy”.

    US lobby backed by arms industry could influence foreign policy | Middle East Eye
    Since the Obama administration took office in 2009, US weapons exports have soared, resulting in a bonanza for weapons manufacturers. As of this writing, stock prices for the defense contractors L-3 Communications (LLL), Northrop Grumman (NOC), Raytheon (RTN), General Dynamics (GD), and Lockheed Martin (LMT) are at or near their respective five-year highs. As Nation contributor and the New America Foundation’s William Hartung recently observed, in 2014, “the United States was credited with more than half the value of all global arms transfer agreements.” In 2015 alone, the United States exported nearly $23 billion in weapons and by some estimates, the Obama administration has approved over $200 billion worth of arms sales since taking office. The United States now controls anywhere between 50 to 70 percent of the global arms market.

    Meanwhile, there is mounting evidence which suggests that US arms merchants are banking on a new and more dangerous cold war with Russia. As The Intercept reported last week, “Weapon makers have told investors that they are relying on tensions with Russia to fuel new business in the wake of Russian’s annexation of Crimea and modest increases in its military budget.”

    Perhaps not surprisingly, the country at the forefront of the push for a new cold war with Russia—Ukraine—has, since the crisis there began in the spring of 2014, turned itself into a veritable arms bazaar. The Obama administration has repeatedly boasted that by the end of 2015, Ukraine had received upwards of $780 million in US security assistance and $2 billion in loan guarantees, while Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko has made no secret of his intention to divert IMF loans to fund the war effort in the east. What has resulted is that, according to a recent AP report, “Ukraine has turned into a supermarket for illegal weapons.”

    https://www.thenation.com/article/th...oreign-policy/
    U.S. defense contractors, which saw international sales rise strongly under President Barack Obama's administration, can expect a continued boom in arms exports under Donald Trump, aided by persistent security risks in the Middle East and rising tensions in Asia and Europe.

    Shares of major defense contractors, including Raytheon Co. (RTN.N), Northrop Grumman Corp (NOC.N) and General Dynamics (GD.N) hit lifetime highs, on Wednesday as investors bet on higher Pentagon spending under Trump, who has vowed a massive build-up of the U.S. military even as he pledges to reduce foreign entanglements.

    U.S. arms export boom under Obama seen continuing with Trump | Reuters
    Weapon makers have told investors that they are relying on tensions with Russia to fuel new business in the wake of Russian’s annexation of Crimea and modest increases in its military budget.

    In particular, the arms industry — both directly and through its arsenal of hired-gun, think-tank experts and lobbyists – is actively pressuring NATO member nations to hike defense spending in line with the NATO goal for member states to spend at least 2 percent of gross domestic product on defense.

    Retired Army Gen. Richard Cody, a vice president at L-3 Communications, the seventh largest U.S. defense contractor, explained to shareholders in December that the industry was faced with a historic opportunity. Following the end of the Cold War, Cody said, peace had “pretty much broken out all over the world,” with Russia in decline and NATO nations celebrating. “The Wall came down,” he said, and “all defense budgets went south.”

    Now, Cody argued, Russia “is resurgent” around the world, putting pressure on U.S. allies. “Nations that belong to NATO are supposed to spend 2 percent of their GDP on defense,” he said, according to a transcript of his remarks. “We know that uptick is coming and so we postured ourselves for it.”

    Speaking to investors at a conference hosted by Credit Suisse in June, Stuart Bradie, the chief executive of KBR, a military contractor, discussed “opportunities in Europe,” highlighting the increase in defense spending by NATO countries in response to “what’s happening with Russia and the Ukraine.”

    The National Defense Industrial Association, a lobby group for the industry, has called on Congress to make it easier for U.S. contractors to sell arms abroad to allies in response to the threat from Russia. Recent articles in National Defense, NDIA’s magazine, discuss the need for NATO allies to boost maritime military spending, spending on Arctic systems, and missile defense, to counter Russia.

    Many experts are unconvinced that Russia poses a direct military threat. The Soviet Union’s military once stood at over 4 million soldiers, but today Russia has less than 1 million. NATO’s combined military budget vastly outranks Russia’s — with the U.S. alone outspending Russia on its military by $609 billion to less than $85 billion.

    And yet, the Aerospace Industries Association, a lobby group for Lockheed Martin, Textron, Raytheon, and other defense contractors, argued in February that the Pentagon is not spending enough to counter “Russian aggression on NATO’s doorstep.”

    Think tanks with major funding from defense contractors, including the Lexington Institute and the Atlantic Council, have similarly demanded higher defense spending to counter Russia.

    Stephen Hadley, the former National Security Advisor to President George W. Bush now serving on the board of Raytheon, a firm competing for major NATO military contracts, has argued forcefully for hiking defense budgets and providing lethal aid to Ukraine. Hadley said in a speech last summer that the U.S. must “raise the cost for what Russia is doing in Ukraine,” adding that “even President Putin is sensitive to body bags.”

    The business press has noticed the development. The Washington Business Journal noted that “if anyone is benefiting from the unease between Russia and the rest of the world, it would have to be Bethesda-based Lockheed Martin Corp,” noting that the firm won a major contract from Poland, which is revamping its military in response to Russia. Roman Schweizer, an analyst for the defense industry with Guggenheim Securities, predicted last year that U.S. arms sales would continue to rise, particularly because “eastern NATO countries will increase procurements in the wake of continued Russian activity in Ukraine.”

    At the Defence Security Exposition International, an arms dealer conference held in London last fall, contractors were quick to use Russia and rising defense budgets to hawk their products. “The tank threat is … much, much more closer to you today because Putin is doing something” in eastern Ukraine, a shoulder-fired-rocket touting representative from Saab told Defense One.

    “Companies like Lockheed Martin and Boeing have pledged to increase the share of exports in their overall revenues, and they have been seeking major deals in East and Central Europe since the 1990s, when NATO expansion began,” said William Hartung, director of the Arms & Security Project at the Center for International Policy. Hartung noted that as some nations ramp up spending, U.S. firms will be “knocking at the door, looking to sell everything from fighter planes to missile defense systems.”

    “Russian saber-rattling has additional benefits for weapons makers because it has become a standard part of the argument for higher Pentagon spending — even though the Pentagon already has more than enough money to address any actual threat to the United States,” he said.

    https://theintercept.com/2016/08/19/...pons-industry/
    And that's just from the first page of a Google search...

  13. #2563
    CabbageSmeller Pursuivant
    Looper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:00 AM
    Posts
    10,347
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo
    And that's just from the first page of a Google search...
    Neo the google-warrior will carpet-bomb you with cut'n'pastes until you crumble under the pressure!


  14. #2564
    Thailand Expat
    thailazer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:23 PM
    Posts
    1,729
    Putin and the Kremlin have their tactics. How big is the hit list at this point anyway?


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/23/w...aine.html?_r=0

  15. #2565
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 08:38 AM
    Posts
    1,129
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Neo the google-warrior will carpet-bomb you with cut'n'pastes until you crumble under the pressure!
    And that's still nothing. Wait when googled for "Seth Rich"....

  16. #2566
    Neo
    Neo is offline
    Dislocated Member
    Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Last Online
    Today @ 12:29 AM
    Location
    Nebuchadnezzar
    Posts
    9,760
    That's a bit too deep for me, so it would be way over Loopers head.

  17. #2567
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 08:38 AM
    Posts
    1,129
    Quote Originally Posted by thailazer View Post
    Putin and the Kremlin have their tactics. How big is the hit list at this point anyway?


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/23/w...aine.html?_r=0
    The trustworthy current leaders of Ukraine will surely not lie to us...

  18. #2568
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    22-09-2017 @ 01:10 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    11,540
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    When governments procure any materiel the acquisition process goes through very thorough vetting to make sure the tender is offered to all competing manufacturers on a level playing field. The evaluation and selection process is subject to stringent vetting to make sure that the purchase decision is based on value and all factors in the decision have to be accounted for and above board. There is no way that arms manufacturers engage in the behaviour you are suggesting in the west.
    Look up Lockheed Startfighter procurement. The tanker plane choice - Boeing and Airbus quoted I wonder who won the contract.


    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    Neo the google-warrior will carpet-bomb you with cut'n'pastes
    As opposed to making it up in your head eh.

  19. #2569
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:17 AM
    Posts
    43,782
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    And that's just from the first page of a Google search...
    None of which says any more than:

    - Arms companies benefit from their weapons being used.
    - Arms companies try and sell governments shit they don't need (sometimes illegally - Harry)

    None of which says they are buying influence over foreign policy, you paranoid whackjob.

    Take your meds, there's a good looney.

  20. #2570
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    off the reservation
    Posts
    2,144
    Lawrence Wilkerson is a retired United States Army soldier and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell. Wilkerson is an adjunct professor at the College of William & Mary where he teaches courses on US national security. He also instructs a senior seminar in the Honors Department at the George Washington University entitled "National Security Decision Making.

    Arms Manufacturers Influence GCC and US Foreign Policy
    Interview with Wilkerson back in 2013



    transcript here: Arms Manufacturers Influence GCC and US Foreign Policy
    Last edited by SKkin; 21-05-2017 at 04:15 PM.

  21. #2571
    CabbageSmeller Pursuivant
    Looper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:00 AM
    Posts
    10,347
    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin
    Arms Manufacturers Influence GCC and US Foreign Policy
    Could you maybe post the relevant bit of your link from the esteemed 'therealnews' so we can cut to the car chase?

  22. #2572
    peckerwood SKkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    off the reservation
    Posts
    2,144
    ^Wilkerson(from the transcript link):

    Paul, I think they do quite a bit. It's not as if the president of Lockheed Martin or Boeing or Raytheon is out looking for war. What it is is that they're out looking for profits, and the more profits, the better. And so if you find a line of conversation--for example, Iran presents a decided threat to the Gulf Cooperation Council--then you can push that line and you can sell more armaments. I think we're up in the $50 billion or $60 billion right now contemplated in just missile defense alone to the GCC countries. So this is an enormous influence on U.S. foreign and security policy, because ultimately what it does is it sets the conditions, intended or not, wittingly or unwittingly, for a more contentious, more tension-filled standoff between, in this case, Iran and the United States.
    <snip>

    I think one of the problems we have today that has magnified Eisenhower's warning is not just the passage of time, in which we have become more of a national security state and thus more subject to the influence of the military-industrial-congressional complex, but also the fact that in '92 or so, at the end of the Cold War, we went from having quite a few military contractors who battled each other in the typical American competitive spirit for contracts with the Pentagon down to about six really big ones. And today what those six do is create monopolies. They collude. Lockheed Martin'll be the prime, and Boeing and Raytheon and General Dynamics will be the subs, and so forth. And this influence has become more like a laser, and it has become more motivated by profits, because the profits are enormous--Lockheed Martin's shares, for example, went from something like $25 a piece to about $125 a piece with the Iraq War--that they exercise an inordinate amount of influence over U.S. decision making. And your point that they might be something the president needs to counter is exactly what Dwight Eisenhower suggested.But I will caution too that I think if you reread that speech, you'll see the main point Eisenhower brings out is about, as he says, an alert citizenry. And that's a direct phrase from the speech. And we simply don't have an alert citizenry in this country today. He said that was absolutely essential to balancing the power of this complex. And we simply don't have that today. And I think that's a huge problem

  23. #2573
    Thailand Expat Mr Earl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    23-09-2017 @ 10:43 PM
    Location
    In the Jungle of Love
    Posts
    13,429
    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    Lawrence Wilkerson is a retired United States Army soldier and former chief of staff to United States Secretary of State Colin Powell. Wilkerson is an adjunct professor at the College of William & Mary where he teaches courses on US national security. He also instructs a senior seminar in the Honors Department at the George Washington University entitled "National Security Decision Making.

    Arms Manufacturers Influence GCC and US Foreign Policy
    Interview with Wilkerson back in 2013



    transcript here: Arms Manufacturers Influence GCC and US Foreign Policy
    Excellent piece!

  24. #2574
    Member
    harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:17 AM
    Posts
    43,782
    Ah, the "real news".

    And Wilkerson did such a cracking job convincing Powell to talk about Saddam's WMDs, which he's been trying to weasel out of ever since.

    Give me fucking strength. So now he's trying to blame the arms manufacturers?


  25. #2575
    Member TuskegeeBen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 05:19 PM
    Posts
    336
    Quote Originally Posted by Gilbert View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    You can speculate all you like about the underlying political forces that drove the coup. It was an internal political matter.
    US mouthpiece video'd saying that the US "invested $5B" in destabilising Ukraine. Hardly internal when it was promoted externally ... by the usual suspects...
    Shhsh! Least you be labeled a "subversive", by those same usual suspects! Capisce?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •