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  1. #3551
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    Stick to bean counting harry.

    The abundant, healthy growth of barnacles lepas anatiferas found on the MH370 flaperon after more than a year in the water, can't grow as rapidly in colder waters of aprox 21C < 24C at 25 < 35 degrees South.

    That kind of abundant healthy growth is typical of nutrient rich, much warmer tropical or subtropical waters, ideally of around 30 < 35C, at latitudes above 21 degrees South, in a pelagic thus nutrient rich environment, such as reefs or small islands such as the more tropical Cocos Islands, which are at 12 degrees South.

    Drifting debris from there would move west and south west towards Africa and the islands mentioned in reports of debris finds.

    Those barnacles didn't grow in isolated Southern Indian Ocean waters, impossible.
    “Is it not written in your Law, ‘I said, you are gods’? John 10:34.

  2. #3552
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    Stick to bean counting harry.

    The abundant, healthy growth of barnacles lepas anatiferas found on the MH370 flaperon after more than a year in the water, can't grow as rapidly in colder waters of aprox 21C < 24C at 25 < 35 degrees South.

    That kind of abundant healthy growth is typical of nutrient rich, much warmer tropical or subtropical waters, ideally of around 30 < 35C, at latitudes above 21 degrees South, in a pelagic thus nutrient rich environment, such as reefs or small islands such as the more tropical Cocos Islands, which are at 12 degrees South.

    Drifting debris from there would move west and south west towards Africa and the islands mentioned in reports of debris finds.

    Those barnacles didn't grow in isolated Southern Indian Ocean waters, impossible.
    You do know that you're a fucking whackjob, don't you? I'd hate to think you walk around thinking you're not.

  3. #3553
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    The abundant, healthy growth of barnacles lepas anatiferas found on the MH370 flaperon after more than a year in the water, can't grow as rapidly in colder waters of aprox 21C < 24C at 25 < 35 degrees South. That kind of abundant healthy growth is typical of nutrient rich, much warmer tropical or subtropical waters, ideally of around 30 < 35C, at latitudes above 21 degrees South, in a pelagic thus nutrient rich environment, such as reefs or small islands such as the more tropical Cocos Islands, which are at 12 degrees South. Drifting debris from there would move west and south west towards Africa and the islands mentioned in reports of debris finds. Those barnacles didn't grow in isolated Southern Indian Ocean waters, impossible.
    Well, how is that related to:


    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    The Cocos Islands are another possible landing place for MH370. It has a long enough landing strip

  4. #3554
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    If the plane was to be disposed of after a hypothetical landing at Cocos West Island, it could easily be driven off the end of the runway into the sea.

    The plane could conceivably have been beached instead, on any other island in the vicinity.

    Whatever happened, the barnacle covered flaperon found indicates it was semi submerged for a long enough time in an ideal environment for such prolific and healthy barnacle growth to occur.

    A pelagic environment such as the reefs and rocks around and islands/reefs north of the Cocos Islands are such an environment, as are the shores of Christmas Island and the Chagos Archipelago of which Diego Garcia is the southernmost island.

  5. #3555
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  6. #3556
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Diego Garcia
    Now you're talking!
    That's where 20 Freescale engineers are sat constructing a most secret military grade cpu, innit?

  7. #3557
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    ^^ What's your explanation for the profusely healthy barnacle growth on MH370's flaperon, harry?

  8. #3558
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    Diego Garcia
    Now you're talking!
    That's where 20 Freescale engineers are sat constructing a most secret military grade cpu, innit?
    Maybe.

    Tell us more.

  9. #3559
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    ^^ What's your explanation for the profusely healthy barnacle growth on MH370's flaperon, harry?
    Oh do fuck off, all you're doing is cut and pasting someone else's mental conspiracy theory and trying to pass it off as your own.


  10. #3560
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    Wrong again harry.

    Read up on marine biology, ...if you're capable,...then explain in your own words how and why you think the barnacles grew on MH370's flaperon.

  11. #3561
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    The barnacles were planted on the flaperon so it should look like it was coming from Diego Garcia.

  12. #3562
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    Do tell.

  13. #3563
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    Wrong again harry.

    Read up on marine biology, ...if you're capable,...then explain in your own words how and why you think the barnacles grew on MH370's flaperon.
    Dem barnacles grew on the plane before it took off, it wasn't de barnicalised by strong high pressure hoses as is also done to remove ice from the wings before takeoff.
    Barnacles, made the plane unbalanced and it drifted west then curved south.
    Blistering barnacles Caption Haddock was at the controls.

  14. #3564
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    You deserve a bender. What's your ph #?

  15. #3565
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    You deserve a bender. What's your ph #?
    Sounds like he was already on one.


  16. #3566
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    Families to lobby Malaysian Transport Minister, urging for MH370 search to continue
    By Asian Correspondent Staff | 22nd January 2017 | @ascorrespondent

    STILL looking for answers, relatives of passengers and crew who were onboard Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 when it mysteriously vanished nearly three years ago are asking authorities to keep searching.

    Last week, Malaysia, Australia and China announced that the deep sea search for the missing aircraft had been suspended, after a sonar scan of 120,000 square kilometers of the Indian Ocean failed to find any trace of the Boeing 777.

    Dissatisfied with the announcement, family members have written letters appealing for the search to be resumed.

    These letters are expected to be delivered to Malaysian Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai during his visit to Australia this coming week.

    Sheryl Keen, a supporter of the international victims’ advocacy group Voice370, said on Sunday that she intends to personally pass the dozens of letters to Liow, who will be meeting with Australian Transport Minister Darren Chester in Perth.

    Keen, who chairs her own support organisation Aircrash Support Group of Australia, said she had yet to receive a response from the Malaysian Consulate in Perth whether she would be allowed a one-minute meeting with Liow on Sunday or Monday.

    “The general content is urging him to continue the search,” she said, adding: “I do believe some of them are quite heartfelt and others are quite brief.”

    Voice370 hopes that the two ministers will use the meeting to reconsider the suspension of the search.

    According to Australian broadcaster SBS, Chester said underwater search is history’s largest and most challenging and has cost more than AU$200 million, with Australia chipping in AU$60 million.

    However, while the deep sea search has been called off, investigations will likely continue, including debris drift analysis and examination of satellite imagery.

    The Malaysian government has also announced a reward for any private searches that can find MH370’s fuselage.

    Malaysian Deputy Transport Minister Abdul Aziz Kaprawi said the government was open to credible private companies searching for it.

    “We can’t proceed until there is new evidence, but if there are credible companies that want to take on the search, then why not?” he said.

    The only confirmed traces of the plane have been three pieces of debris found washed up on the island country Mauritius, the French island Reunion and an island off Tanzania.

    As many as 30 other pieces of wreckage found there and on beaches in Mozambique, Tanzania and South Africa are suspected to have come from the plane.

    Additional reporting by Associated Press and Reuters.

    Families to lobby Malaysian Transport Minister, urging for MH370 search to continue - Asian Correspondent

  17. #3567

  18. #3568
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    Gordon Bennett it's three years on Wednesday.

    Where does the time go!

  19. #3569
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    We're still not sure where it went...The time, that is...And the airplane, as well...

  20. #3570
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    We know where the plane went mate, it's in Davey Jones Locker.

  21. #3571
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    Australian government scientist Neil Gordon headed up the team whose mathematical analysis of satellite signals transmitted by the plane defined the boundaries of the 120,000-sq-km seabed search zone. With the hunt for MH370 still empty-handed, he thinks the plane most likely came down further to the northeast.

    "If you look at the probability distribution, it would say, 'Go up north,'" says Gordon, head of the Data and Information Fusion group at Australia's Defense Science Technology Group, in his first-ever press interview.

    For the plane to have traveled somewhere beyond the search zone, there are a couple possibilities. Either the airliner was held in a slow, gliding descent and hit the sea further to the southeast, or it followed a curving path further to the northeast.

    At one time, both were considered viable possibilities, but recently search officials took a more careful look at the data from the 7th ping and determined that it did not fit with the glide scenario. "The final electronic communication signaling points to very high descent rates," Gordon says. "If you look at the simulation results that Boeing has done for uncontrolled descent from that time, they're consistent with the numbers you get from the final data messages pointing to a very rapid descent rate."

    Specifically, the metadata indicate the plane was descending at about 5,000 feet per minute (compared to 2,000-3,000 feet per minute for a typical airliner descent into landing) and then, eight seconds later, somewhere between 12,000 and 20,000 feet per minute.

    This is a high rate of descent, and it indicates that the dive was steepening. Therefore, it would have struck the surface of the ocean soon thereafter and at high speed. This scenario would be consistent with the small size of most of the pieces recovered so far, as well as the recent assessment by the ATSB that the plane's right flap was stowed inside the wing during impact with the sea. If the pilot were making a gentle ditching, you'd expect that flap to be deployed.

    Top Mathematician Says MH370 Probably Crashed North of the Search Zone

  22. #3572
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    This scenario would be consistent with the small size of most of the pieces recovered so far, as well as the recent assessment by the ATSB that the plane's right flap was stowed inside the wing during impact with the sea. If the pilot were making a gentle ditching, you'd expect that flap to be deployed.
    If the plane impacted at high speed there would be bits floating everywhere: Seats, doors, luggage, etc.

    All that's been recovered is consistent with a low speed, full flaps flight into water.

    The ATSB were deliberately vague in their assessment:

    “The possibility of the damage originating from a more complex failure sequence, commencing with the flaps extended, was considered much less likely,” says the inquiry.

  23. #3573
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    Bits floating everywhere ?
    Wasn't there a storm in the area just afterwards, which impeded the initial search ?

  24. #3574
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    Bits floating everywhere ?
    Wasn't there a storm in the area just afterwards, which impeded the initial search ?
    Haven't bits of the wing and tail assemblies been turning up all over the place (20 so far)?

    And nothing that indicates catastrophic destruction of the aircraft.

  25. #3575
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    Well, there WAS that piece that looked burnt.

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