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  1. #51
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    The 10th year of the Mexican drug war. The kids have grown up with violence all of their lives and by the time they're 16 their in gangs and committing violence.

    Let's keep those borders open.


    December 11, 2016, 3:31 PM
    100,000 dead, 30,000 missing: Mexico’s war on drugs turns 10

    CIUDAD VICTORIA, Mexico - Ten years after Mexico declared a war on drugs, the offensive has left some major drug cartels splintered and many old-line kingpins like Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman in jail, but done little to reduce crime or violence in the nation’s roughest regions.

    Some say the war has been a crucial, but flawed, effort. Others argue the offensive begun by then-President Felipe Calderon on Dec. 11, 2006, unleashed an unnecessary tragedy with more than 100,000 people dead and about 30,000 missing - a toll comparable to the Central American civil wars of the 1980s.

    In some places, homicide rates have lessened. In others, the killings continue unabated. The drawn-out conflict has also had a profound effect on those close to the cross-hairs of suffering: youths inured to extreme violence; adults so fed-up with poor and corrupt policing that they took up arms as vigilantes; and families who banded together in the face of authorities’ inability to find their vanished loved ones.

    A law enforcement official in the northern border state of Tamaulipas told The Associated Press he now routinely encounters young cartel gunmen who have few regrets about their vocation. In fact, they see killing as the best way to afford things like smartphones, cars and girlfriends.

    “I ask them, ‘What do you want to be?’ And they say, ‘To be a chief look-out and have a narco-corrido song written about me,” said the official, who was not authorized to be quoted by name. “As young as they are, they have no other aspiration in life.”

    He recalled the case of one 16-year-old who kidnapped, killed and mutilated his victims, and then took selfies with the cut-up bodies. A decade into the war, the violence is the only reality his generation has ever known.

    “The kids who are getting arrested now, from about 14 years old and up, they have grown up with crime,” the official said. “It is something completely normal to them.”

    Now the state faces a new challenge: Many of the older cartel gunmen jailed early on were convicted only of lesser weapons charges, as prosecutors are often unable to make organized-crime or money-laundering charges stick, and some are being released and returning to their old ways.

    While Tamaulipas has calmed somewhat after reaching horrifying murder levels around 2010-2012, there are still shootouts and mass graves and piles of bodies - only no longer as frequently. Arrests and deaths have fractured the hyper-violent Zetas cartel in Tamaulipas, but the result has been a dozen smaller factions at war with each other for control.

    “Right now, if there’s anything good in this whole bad situation, it is that these groups don’t have that much power anymore,” former FBI agent Arturo Fontes said. “But they are divided, and that is why there is a lot of chaos.”

    Mexico’s armed forces have increasingly been pulled into the conflict because police forces are often corrupt or unreliable. That has had its own toll on the troops, who are frequently ambushed and accused of illegally executing detained cartel suspects in some cases.

    Defense Secretary Gen. Salvador Cienfuegos noted that the army’s involvement was only supposed to be temporary while policing was reformed.

    “Ten years ago it was decided that the police should be rebuilt, and we still haven’t seen that reconstruction,” Cienfuegos said. “This isn’t something that can be solved with bullets. It requires other measures, and there has not been decisive action on budgets to make that happen.”

    Calderon launched the drug counteroffensive by sending troops to his home state of Michoacan, where the Familia Michoacana drug gang and later the Knights Templar cartel have dominated many aspects of daily life, such as telling residents when to pick crops and determining what price they would get. Through extortion, the gangs took a cut of every industry in the state.

    Citizens formed vigilante groups and largely chased the Knights Templar out, though other gangs have since taken root.

    “Things are the same as far as crime,” said Hipolito Mora, the founder of one of the first “self-defense” militias. “The government has to do more to combat the corruption in itself. If they don’t do that, nothing is going to work. It is the corruption within the government that creates tolerance for organized crime.”

    At the same time, Mora, who also owns a lime orchard, said the new cartels no longer try to dictate when he can harvest or burn down the warehouses of people who disobey their orders.

    Bigger gains can be seen in places like Ciudad Juarez, which is across the border from El Paso, Texas, and where an average of 10 people were killed each day at the height of the city’s violence in 2008-2010. In Chihuahua state, home to Juarez, homicides have fallen by about two-thirds since it began a stepped-up policing effort in 2010.

    But in some places, things seem to be getting worse.

    In the southern state of Guerrero, authorities routinely report grim discoveries: mass graves containing the bodies of kidnap victims, severed human heads dumped in public, federal agents burned to death on a highway. The once-glamorous resort of Acapulco is now one of the world’s deadliest cities.

    In Iguala, Guerrero, where 43 teachers’ college students disappeared in 2014, relatives of other people who have vanished were emboldened enough to form a group to search for their own missing loved ones. So far they have found and gotten authorities to exhume 18 bodies from clandestine graves - a measure of closure at least for those families, when missing-persons cases have long been routinely written off by police.

    While the government has created support agencies for victims and improved its handling of investigations and bodies, it is grass-roots groups like The Other Disappeared that have mainly been responsible for such small victories.

    “If there has been anything good that has come out of all of this, I would say it is the awakening of the victims,” said group co-founder Adriana Bahena, whose husband disappeared in 2011.

    Raul Benitez, a security specialist at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, said Calderon was right to fight the cartels but argued that the government has failed to stop corruption within its own ranks.

    “Without that,” Benitez said, “the strategy will always fail.”

    Mexico?s war on drugs turns 10 - CBS News

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boon Mee
    Excellent food, Great beer, terrific climate - what's not to like about Mexico.
    Only crime.

  3. #53
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    ^
    Cartels and being kidnapped and put in a vat of acid.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sumbitch View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Boon Mee
    Excellent food, Great beer, terrific climate - what's not to like about Mexico.
    Only crime.
    Not sure Mexico has food that is any better than anywhere, and beer is beer. Didn't mention the women, they would in my estimation rank above food or beer.

    There are some basic steps you can take which lower greatly the chances of you being a crime victim in Mexico.

    1) Do not drive at night.

    2) When driving across country, use the toll roads as much as possible. There is some security, and the maintenance level makes them almost on the level of good American roads. Before embarking on any journey, research, research, research. Some non-toll roads are known as hotbeds of car jacking. There are some Mexican states you should not drive in period.

    3) "Situational Awareness" ... Unless you know the neighborhood very well, don't be out past 9pm.

    4) Keep a low profile, do not conduct yourself as if you are rich, and do not flash money around (bearing in mind the equivalent of USD20 is a full day of wages for many). If you don't fully understand the previous sentence, hanging out at your resort hotel is your best course of action.

    5) When exchanging money into pesos at a cambio or bank, do so early in the morning, and go directly back to your hotel/home with the money. Thieves are known to watch banks and cambios in the late afternoon or early evening, and follow and rob those people who go out for an evening with an obvious pocket or purse full of money.

    6) It's a reality that about 25% of Mexico is not safe for anyone at any time, including all the Mexican states that border New Mexico and Texas, as well as the city of Tijuana (drug cartels + thieves that prey on day travelers from America). Avoid them.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by UrbanMan
    Not sure Mexico has food that is any better than anywhere, and beer is beer. Didn't mention the women, they would in my estimation rank above food or beer.
    No way the food is healthy--rice, beans, greasy meat and tortillas? AFAIC the only redeeming factor is the hot sauce. The beer is nothing special either. Tecate and Tres Equis?

  6. #56
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    The average Mexican diet is not healthy at all, unlike the SE Asian diet. As for the Mexican women, they are pretty in their early 20s, but soon start to spread after too many tortillas. The beer is just OK. My plan was to retire in Mexico, mostly for the fishing, but I am glad now I decided on Thailand.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    The average Mexican diet is not healthy at all, unlike the SE Asian diet. As for the Mexican women, they are pretty in their early 20s, but soon start to spread after too many tortillas. The beer is just OK. My plan was to retire in Mexico, mostly for the fishing, but I am glad now I decided on Thailand.
    In general I see it the same way with many of the wome. They do grow as the age - sideways.

    My uncle is retired in Mexico (not year-round) and loves his small universe there on the western coast.

    Not to keep regurgitating the crime issue, but it is an issue now.

    I would not drive far at night.

  8. #58
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    True, crime has unfortunately increased. I used to be able and leave all my diving gear unguarded in a small palapa in Baja to drive into town for shopping and drinking to come back without anything being touched. The days of camping out in the sand dunes alone are gone as well. Crime in Mexico increases near resort areas as in Thailand. Add the current cartels and Mexico is definitely more dangerous for foreigners than Thailand. I like Mexico, but not enough to retire there.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers
    As for the Mexican women, they are pretty in their early 20s, but soon start to spread after too many tortillas.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Pizza
    In general I see it the same way with many of the wome. They do grow as the age - sideways.
    My neighbor's wife (south east Asian mix) is older (they have a teenage daughter ... she is on the edge of being supernatural), for many months I thought she was smokin hot. Then one day I saw her coming home wearing a t-shirt and compression pants (with a short skirt over the pants), and the bubble was burst. She isn't fat, but her shape was definitely unimpressive. Asian women love their facial makeup, and their flowing blouses and skirts, in some cases they are nothing but a disguise.

    A lot of Latino women get wide, no doubt about that. In Mexico itself, a lot of it can be chalked up to the peasant mindset. The way food is prepared (fry pan with a couple centimeters of oil/liquid fat is how most food is cooked in many households), the fact if you grew up very poor the idea of moderating food intake just doesn't exist, gramma was fat mom was fat therefore fat is normal, and so on.

    .
    Last edited by UrbanMan; 13-12-2016 at 11:51 PM.

  10. #60
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    As the Mexican election cycle nears, a populist is in the house.


    Mexico’s populist Amlo capitalises on economic woes
    Anti-establishment figure hopes to follow in Trump’s footsteps and win presidency



    Mexicans face new year shock at petrol pumps

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador
    January 2, 2017

    Telling voters what they wanted to hear worked out well for Donald Trump. As Mexico shifts into election gear in 2017, another populist, anti-establishment figure will be hoping to follow in the US president-elect’s footsteps.

    Sign up By signing up you confirm that you have read and agree to the terms and conditions, cookie policy and privacy policy.

    Like Mr Trump, Andrés Manuel López Obrador is a love-him or loathe-him figure with a message that resonates with the underprivileged and the angry.


    In the case of Amlo, as the maverick leftist is widely known, that message includes: promises to stamp out corruption, sweep out the ‘mafia of power’, give the elderly better pensions, cut fat cat government salaries, create jobs and roll out a huge infrastructure programme. He pledges to bring “real change” to Mexico.

    https://www.ft.com/content/ab335480-...9-9445cac8966f

  11. #61
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    The Mexican Peso continues to weaken. Anybody heading there soon? An olde to Snake eyes below and Ford and GM and Trump cause concern.

    Mexican peso hits record low vs. dollar as Trump trade worries heat up
    Evelyn Cheng | @chengevelyn
    CNBC.com
    1/4/2016


    A board displaying the exchange rate of the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar is pictured outside at a Banorte bank branch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, January 4, 2017.

    Jose Luis Gonzalez | Reuters

    A board displaying the exchange rate of the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar is pictured outside at a Banorte bank branch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, January 4, 2017.

    The weakness in the Mexican peso looks like it will continue in 2017 as traders come to grips with potential changes in U.S. trade policy.

    "The market is increasingly convinced Donald Trump wasn't kidding around about tackling Mexico and production in Mexico," said Adam Button, currency analyst at ForexLive.com.

    The peso fell for a second straight day Wednesday to record lows against the U.S. dollar as traders worried about the negative impact of President-elect Donald Trump's policies on the Mexican economy.

    "The key driver for the last two days is the news that Ford would not be investing in Mexico and there's concern GM" may not either,
    said Thierry Albert Wizman, global interest rates and currencies strategist at Macquarie.

    Mexican peso hits record low vs. dollar as Trump trade worries heat up

  12. #62
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    I'm sure Socal/Marcus did a very amusing travel/pic thread on here a while back. Puts things in perspective for the tourist or casual visitor.
    You're probably like me cp, in that you are too lazy to search for it.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui View Post
    I'm sure Socal/Marcus did a very amusing travel/pic thread on here a while back. Puts things in perspective for the tourist or casual visitor.
    You're probably like me cp, in that you are too lazy to search for it.
    I recall reading it a long time ago.

    Also, I've been to Mexico 3 times over 29 years, and read up on the country quite a bit.

    I'll be heading in that direction, hopefully in less than 6-7 months.

  14. #64
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    The Mexican elections are coming. Presidents of Mexico serve one, 6-year term.

    Here is "AMLO," a likely candidate who is not from the PRI or PAN party:


    The Anti-Trump Is Rising in Mexico, Feeding on Every Snub
    by Nacha Cattan

    February 3, 2017
    Twice-beaten populist Lopez Obrador leads 2018 voting race

    He’s riding a wave of Mexican rage over Trump’s wall, Nafta

    Where Do Things Stand Between U.S., Mexico on Nafta?

    By the time the last brick is laid atop President Donald Trump’s Mexican wall, it’s a fair bet that someone more antagonistic toward the U.S. will hold power on its southern side.

    Especially if that someone is Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. Which, thanks to Trump, looks increasingly likely.



    The politician known locally as Amlo is the early frontrunner in Mexico’s 2018 presidential race. By itself, that may not mean much: Polls are unreliable, voting is a long way off, and Lopez Obrador is a two-time election loser in a country that stood aloof from Latin America’s populist turn and instead tethered its economy ever closer to the U.S.

    But good luck selling that line to Mexicans right now. The momentum on Amlo’s side is palpable. Amid a spasm of national rage, voters are increasingly sympathetic to the cries of a radical outsider who promises to end a relationship of “subordination” to the U.S. and rebuild the domestic economy. In other words, Trump -- with his brash pledges to rewrite Nafta and stick Mexico with the bill for building the wall -- has created the perfect climate for an anti-Trump south of the border.

    “Winner of today’s U.S. Mexico dust-up: Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador,” Eurasia Group President Ian Bremmer tweeted last week. “Hope Trump is looking forward to working with him.”

    ‘Bad Hombres’

    Even if it doesn’t come to that, the relationship is getting tense, as Mexico’s mainstream parties are pulled in Amlo’s direction. President Enrique Pena Nieto, who can’t run for re-election, canceled a visit with Trump scheduled for this week. And he’s begun to stress the importance of bolstering the local economy and raising wages -- even though keeping them low, to make Mexico attractive to American corporations, has effectively been government policy for decades.

    Mexico’s peso slid about 17 percent after Trump’s election win, before recovering some of those losses since he took office. Still, almost every time the new president talks about Mexico, there’s something to make investors uneasy -- and Mexicans madder. This week, for example, he’s said to have suggested the U.S. might send troops to deal with “bad hombres down there,” a comment later downplayed as “lighthearted.” On Friday, a report showed Mexican consumers have never been so pessimistic about their economic prospects.

    Popular feeling is running so strong that Mexican politicians have little choice but to fall in line. Online campaigns are calling on Mexicans to vacation at home (“Adios Disneylandia... Hola Mexico”). Local governments and activists demand boycotts of U.S. products. Many Mexicans have draped the national flag across their social media pages.

    It just sounds less convincing coming from leaders who’ve made a career out of close U.S. ties. Pena Nieto’s approval rating is 12 percent. Jose Hernandez Solis, a 56-year-old street vendor at an Amlo rally in Mexico City on Monday, certainly wasn’t persuaded.

    ‘Boot-Licker’

    “The president is a boot-licker,” Solis said. “Lopez Obrador has the guts to stand up to Trump and tell it like it is.” Straight talk, of course, is exactly the reason many U.S. voters gave for backing Trump.

    At the rally, Lopez Obrador -- a 63-year-old with a shock of white hair who’s recently taken to sporting sideburns -- did what he usually does. He blamed “neoliberalism” for rampant inequality and violence, and vowed to protect local farmers from northern competition. “Everything depends on strengthening Mexico,” he said, “so we can confront aggression from abroad with strength.”

    Such rhetoric almost won him the presidency in 2006. Lopez Obrador lost that election by less than 1 percentage point. His supporters shut down central Mexico City for weeks afterward, claiming the vote was rigged. The standoff irritated many Mexicans, and may have contributed to Amlo’s defeat by Pena Nieto in 2012, when the margin was wider.

    An Amlo presidency would be a step into the unknown for Mexico.
    His Morena party is only two years old; by contrast, Pena Nieto’s PRI has roots in the Mexican Revolution of a century ago, and has been in power for all but 12 years since then. An early test of the 2018 contenders may come in June this year when several states hold local elections.

    ‘Chavez Wannabe’

    There’s at least one Latin American precedent that’s encouraging for a left-leaning, nicknamed politician on the comeback trail. Luiz Inacio Da Silva finally won Brazil’s presidency for his Workers’ Party in 2002 after three failed attempts.

    If Amlo can repeat Lula’s feat, it will spell trouble for Washington, according to Jose Cardenas, a former senior official at the State Department. The Brazilian toned down his populism once he took office. Lopez Obrador, according to Cardenas, bears a closer resemblance to another Latin leader who didn’t.

    Amlo is a “Hugo Chavez wannabe,” Cardenas wrote in National Review. He warned of likely disputes “on everything from border security, counterterrorism, and drug-war cooperation to deportations and restricting Central American migration.”

    Every item on that list is a hot-button issue for Trump. But, as seen from Mexico, they’re primarily northern problems.

    South of the border, corruption and violence -- especially the disappearance and killing of dozens of students two years ago, in which the police were implicated -- had spread disillusion with the political establishment well before Trump’s arrival.

    Nafta ‘Straitjacket’

    Lopez Obrador would add the country’s U.S.-friendly energy and agriculture policies to the catalog of woes. He says Mexico will consume its own gasoline and food on his watch, instead of importing it.

    That would mean changes to Nafta, probably not the ones Trump has in mind -- assuming the trade pact survives at all
    . Its impact on Mexico is hotly debated in any case, and both sides can cite data that backs up their arguments.

    Nafta has made no inroads into Mexico’s poverty rate.
    It stood at 53 percent in 2014, pretty much unchanged from two decades earlier when the trade accord went into effect, according to the World Bank. But the country has attracted billions of dollars of foreign investment in that period, turning it into the worlds seventh-largest automaker and creating thousands of jobs.

    Lopez Obrador and his supporters take the glass-half-empty view.


    “Nafta is a straitjacket that has kept 50 percent of our society in poverty”
    said Senator Manuel Bartlett of the Labor Party. “This is not about being antagonistic to the United States, it’s about being nationalist in defense of Mexico’s interests.”

    Americans north of the wall may soon get to decide for themselves which description fits Amlo best. He’s planning a speaking tour of U.S. cities with large immigrant communities. First up, on Feb. 12, is Los Angeles.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...t-him-in-power

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Pizza View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui View Post
    I'm sure Socal/Marcus did a very amusing travel/pic thread on here a while back. Puts things in perspective for the tourist or casual visitor.
    You're probably like me cp, in that you are too lazy to search for it.
    I recall reading it a long time ago.

    Also, I've been to Mexico 3 times over 29 years, and read up on the country quite a bit.

    I'll be heading in that direction, hopefully in less than 6-7 months.
    Good. Stay there.

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    More on AMLO. He's rising.

    We'll likely be seeing more of him.


    A Mexican populist rises to face Trump’s America

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador, president of the left-leaning National Regeneration Movement, center, arrives for an event on Sunday in Los Angeles. The politician known as AMLO is the early front-runner in Mexico’s 2018 presidential race. (Dania Maxwell/Bloomberg News)
    By Joshua Partlow February 16 at 2:25 PM
    LOS ANGELES — Abel Flores, a 45-year-old day laborer, left central Mexico three decades ago and has not voted regularly in its elections. And yet, as the sun was setting on a recent evening, he was jammed with hundreds of Mexican Americans into a tree-shaded Los Angeles plaza to cheer on a rabble-rousing politician who could take Mexico in a very different direction.

    “I don’t normally do this kind of thing,” Flores said, referring to the rally for Andrés Manuel López Obrador, widely known as AMLO. But the day laborer felt that Mexico was threatened by President Trump, who has vowed to build a border wall and renegotiate the historic free-trade agreement with the United States.

    “AMLO is the only person who can do anything to protect Mexico,” Flores declared.

    The outrage in Mexico over Trump’s proposals has elevated a longtime politician who has unnerved the country’s business community with his nationalist views and leftist rhetoric. Political opponents have compared López Obrador with the late Hugo Chávez, a strongman who steered Venezuela toward socialism. While that may be an exaggeration, López Obrador, 63, can bring thousands into the streets on command. His critics worry that his penchant for stubborn resistance could provoke confrontation with the United States, while his fans see him as a defender of the common man.

    Although he has not yet officially declared his candidacy for next year’s presidential race, López Obrador has become the clear front-runner: A recent poll by El Financiero newspaper had him capturing 33 percent of voter support, six points ahead of Margarita Zavala of the conservative National Action Party (PAN). López Obrador is already in campaign mode, barnstorming the country and traveling to the United States to drum up support from Mexican Americans.

    [Trump meets with Carlos Slim as Mexican leaders seek better relations]

    As he spoke to the crowd in Plaza Olvera in Los Angeles on Sunday, López Obrador hit some fiery notes, comparing Trump’s America to Hitler’s Germany, but he ultimately called for calm.

    “We should counter the strategy of Trump and his advisers not with shouts and insults . . . but with intelligence, wisdom and dignity,” he said. “This is a battle that we should wage on the terrain of ideas.”


    Trump will probably be a major campaign issue when Mexicans go to the polls next year. López Obrador has criticized the U.S. president’s policies but showed restraint, casting himself as the mature elder statesman. On the night Trump won the election, López Obrador posted a short video telling Mexicans that they had “no reason to worry” and that they belonged to a sovereign nation that “doesn’t depend on any foreign government.” During the current standoff with Trump over who will pay for the border wall, López Obrador has refrained from bashing President Enrique Peña Nieto, who is accused by some Mexicans of being too accommodating.

    A fixture on Mexico’s left for decades, López Obrador comes from the gulf coast state of Tabasco, where he ran unsuccessfully for governor. He gained prominence as the mayor of Mexico City from 2000 to 2005, cutting an unusual figure by avoiding many of the trappings of high office and driving around in a Nissan Sentra. He gave subsidies to the poor and elderly but also balanced the budget, built elevated roadways to relieve the city’s notorious traffic, and raised tax collection. He left office with an approval rating of more than 80 percent.

    But in 2006, after narrowly [at]losing the presidential election, [at]López Obrador provoked a political crisis by refusing to accept the victory of Felipe Calderón, a conservative, and instead declaring himself the nation’s “legitimate president.” The leftist showed his mastery at mobilizing crowds, leading a six-week blockade of one of Mexico’s main boulevards.

    After he again lost the presidential election in 2012, López Obrador left Mexico’s main leftist party — the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) — and formed an offshoot called MORENA, or the National Regeneration Movement.

    [White House says Mexico border wall might be funded by tax on imports]

    Peña Nieto and his traditionally dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) have become deeply unpopular because of a sluggish economy, corruption scandals and the perception that the president has not stood up to Trump. Peña Nieto and his team have been careful not to antagonize Trump, for fear of damaging the relationship with Mexico’s No. 1 trade partner.


    “Andrés Manuel is well positioned in this situation to create an alternative path, and he has benefited a lot because Peña Nieto’s team has been clumsy,” said Alberto Aziz Nassif, a political analyst in Mexico City. “He is reading these new winds, these new times.”

    López Obrador has been a front-runner before only to fade as the election gets closer. His criticssee him as an arrogant, power-hungry figure. Much of the business and political elite consider him a particular threat. He has been skeptical of Mexico’s embrace of free trade and opposed Peña Nieto’s moves to open the country’s crucial oil industry to foreign investment.

    “He is authoritarian, intolerant, he has a vision of the world where those who are with him are good and the others are bad,” said Francisco Gil Villegas, a political analyst in Mexico City. “He’s not very democratic, and he is willing to operate above the Constitution.”

    Despite his long political history, López Obrador sees himself as an outsider. In a speech on Sunday at a cultural center in [at]Tijuana, south of the border from San Diego, he warned that the electoral system was rigged, and he predicted fraud in next year’s vote.

    His new book, “2018 The Exit: Decline and Rebirth in Mexico,” opens with the line: “Corruption is the principal problem in Mexico,” a theme he has emphasized since his first presidential run a decade ago.

    In his Tijuana speech, López Obrador estimated that hundreds of millions of dollars in government funds are siphoned away each year in corruption and promised that he would recover this money — he did not specify how — and spend it on scholarships for students. He vowed to sell all the presidential airplanes and helicopters and travel in a more humble fashion. These types of promises resonate with many Mexicans who are fed up with rampant corruption.

    The crowd that greeted López Obrador in Los Angeles later that day included documented and undocumented immigrants, migrant advocates and Dodgers first baseman Adrián González, who is Mexican American. Trump’s threats to deport illegal immigrants and the recent wave of immigration raids in several U.S. cities have alarmed many in the Mexican diaspora.


    Los Angeles was the first of seven U.S. cities that López Obrador plans to visit in coming weeks as he casts himself as a defender of immigrant rights. At the end of his Tijuana speech, he led a chant that immigrants “are not alone.”

    In his remarks, López Obrador was deeply critical of Trump, [at]describing him as a “neo-fascist” who won the presidency through a “discourse of hate.” But he called for opposing the U.S. president through legal and democratic means. He urged bilingual lawyers to help migrants and suggested that media outlets document the migrant experience.

    “I confess that I am optimistic,” he said. “The wall and demagoguery can’t compete with the talent and dignity of the United States.”

    He concluded, “Viva the state of California!”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...=.47ad5bab819c

  17. #67
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    Can drive to Mexico in two hours from my house. I suppose I need to update my profile...

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    You must be in Phoenix.

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    I haven't been to Mexico in too long. Puerto Penasco used to be pretty sweet in its heyday. It's changed though.

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    Mexico latinas, north america's answer to thais, but with actual butts and boobs, some risk of obesity. Nice, worth a look.

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    Quote Originally Posted by redhaze View Post
    I haven't been to Mexico in too long. Puerto Penasco used to be pretty sweet in its heyday. It's changed though.
    I've seen a lot YouTube's on how great and safe it is. But some of these peeps sell condos there.

    How was it, then?

    How is it now?

    I've never been there.

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    Those who think the Thai Police are bad should try driving a car with American plates into Mexico.
    They don't even pretend it's anything more than a shake down and usually expect $20-50 (500-1500 Baht).

    The only time I ever physically tried to silence my ex wife was when my father-in-law was stopped by the Mexican police for running a traffic light that didn't exist. She's sitting in the back seat saying "don't give that dog anything" in Spanish. Both my in-laws (who were born there) got to her before I could.
    Ex father in law told the cop "my daughter is loca" gave him $40 and we left feeling relieved.

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    Thinking of moving to Mexico and spending a year there. Been looking at Playa Del Carmen because it is an international resort with a beach, a wide array of restaurants and bars. The fact it seems to be pedestrian friendly is also a plus.

    What do people think of that area or are there other areas that you would go to instead? I am not really looking to experience the real Mexico just want convenience and good internet and a few bars to drink at. I also want to stay somewhere that is safe as far as crime goes.

    I don't plan to stay any longer than that so would prefer places it is easier for foreigners that aren't completely fluent in the language.

    Any feedback or other places I should look into?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Pizza
    I've seen a lot YouTube's on how great and safe it is. But some of these peeps sell condos there.

    How was it, then?

    How is it now?

    I've never been there.
    Puerto Penasco/Rocky Point was a pretty fun place in its heyday. Good size town, not too big to navigate but nice enough to enjoy. Good fishing, nice bars. Kids from Univ. of Arizona and Arizona State would come in droves for the holidays (particularly spring break). My (future) wife and I were two of them. It was a pretty big up and coming town. Its heyday was really the early to mid-2000's. Tons of talk of it becoming the next Cancun or some nonsense.

    Big resorts came in like gangbusters in the early to mid-2000's, most of them building along the largely unspoiled coast about 20 minutes or so outside of the main town itself. Some so big, they actually agreed to pool their money and fund an international airport located five minutes from the resorts along the Sea of Cortez. The biggest investor was Mayan Resorts (who own numerous upscale resorts across Mexico). Their dream was flights arriving from all spots around the globe.

    Two major things occurred that totally destroyed this dream/fantasy: One was the laws passed in the years following 9/11. Prior to this time, you could zip across the Arizona border, and be in Rocky Point drinking a cervesa within an hour, with nothing more than a United States driver's license to show. This entire area of Mexico (Senora) was called a "free zone". Looking back, it didn't even really seem like there were rules about length of stay or anything. Just get stopped at the border, a few questions about whatever the agent felt like talking about, and away you went. Same system on return for Americans. Show your ID, back in the country you go. No stamp, no tracking, nada.

    9/11 and the hysteria that followed changed all that. Everyone was suddenly required to have a passport to cross into Mexico. That was pretty much the death knell of the city right there. I mean, Mexico is fun and all but we're not talking about international travelers here making a long journey. We are talking about a four hour ride from Tucson/Phoenix to have some fun on the weekend.

    To top it off, the drug shit and all the horrible crime associated with that hit around this same time. Rocky Point didn't get the worst of it, but it had enough stories about the road leading in to scare off those few remaining people who would have bothered with a passport.

    Fast forward to today. The International Airport is a ghost town that runs a few domestic flights a day. The resorts still attract a few people. The city itself, particularly the bar/tourist area, is an absolute ghost town and certainly not a place you'd want to find yourself past dark. Almost none of the tourists who come to the area even enter the city these days, all package tourists basically.

    Too bad, the place was really something. But bad luck and overzealous planning killed it.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by redhaze View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Pizza
    I've seen a lot YouTube's on how great and safe it is. But some of these peeps sell condos there.

    How was it, then?

    How is it now?

    I've never been there.
    Puerto Penasco/Rocky Point was a pretty fun place in its heyday. Good size town, not too big to navigate but nice enough to enjoy. Good fishing, nice bars. Kids from Univ. of Arizona and Arizona State would come in droves for the holidays (particularly spring break). My (future) wife and I were two of them. It was a pretty big up and coming town. Its heyday was really the early to mid-2000's. Tons of talk of it becoming the next Cancun or some nonsense.

    Big resorts came in like gangbusters in the early to mid-2000's, most of them building along the largely unspoiled coast about 20 minutes or so outside of the main town itself. Some so big, they actually agreed to pool their money and fund an international airport located five minutes from the resorts along the Sea of Cortez. The biggest investor was Mayan Resorts (who own numerous upscale resorts across Mexico). Their dream was flights arriving from all spots around the globe.

    Two major things occurred that totally destroyed this dream/fantasy: One was the laws passed in the years following 9/11. Prior to this time, you could zip across the Arizona border, and be in Rocky Point drinking a cervesa within an hour, with nothing more than a United States driver's license to show. This entire area of Mexico (Senora) was called a "free zone". Looking back, it didn't even really seem like there were rules about length of stay or anything. Just get stopped at the border, a few questions about whatever the agent felt like talking about, and away you went. Same system on return for Americans. Show your ID, back in the country you go. No stamp, no tracking, nada.

    9/11 and the hysteria that followed changed all that. Everyone was suddenly required to have a passport to cross into Mexico. That was pretty much the death knell of the city right there. I mean, Mexico is fun and all but we're not talking about international travelers here making a long journey. We are talking about a four hour ride from Tucson/Phoenix to have some fun on the weekend.

    To top it off, the drug shit and all the horrible crime associated with that hit around this same time. Rocky Point didn't get the worst of it, but it had enough stories about the road leading in to scare off those few remaining people who would have bothered with a passport.

    Fast forward to today. The International Airport is a ghost town that runs a few domestic flights a day. The resorts still attract a few people. The city itself, particularly the bar/tourist area, is an absolute ghost town and certainly not a place you'd want to find yourself past dark. Almost none of the tourists who come to the area even enter the city these days, all package tourists basically.

    Too bad, the place was really something. But bad luck and overzealous planning killed it.
    Thanks for the reply and info, redhaze.

    There are still groups of Americans from AZ that make there pilgrimage to Puerto Punesto / Rocky point.

    Must be a lot less as you note than before.

    Perhaps that's a good thing?


    Cheers for the info. I'm curious about it.

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