Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    Newbie Divethai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    25-01-2007 @ 10:40 AM
    Posts
    23

    Becoming a Diver

    Post any questions you have about PADI's open water diver, advanced open water, rescue or any PADI specialty Certification's here. We will be happy to answer or research any questions you have
    Last edited by Divethai; 20-10-2006 at 05:26 PM.

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    In a rather cold and dark place
    Posts
    12,823
    How does one become an industrial diver?

    Do I have to do the PADI first or can I just go on an industrial diving course?

  3. #3
    Newbie Divethai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    25-01-2007 @ 10:40 AM
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by mrsquirrel View Post
    How does one become an industrial diver?

    Do I have to do the PADI first or can I just go on an industrial diving course?

    Commercial Diving is a whole differernt type of diving. If you do a search for commercial diving schools there are a number of websites that will be able to give you guidance. Here at Mermaids we are researching an intro to commercial diving course but at the present time we are not able to offer it.

    Best

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    In a rather cold and dark place
    Posts
    12,823
    So do I have to do the PADI first or can I just go and take a commercial diving course?

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    27-11-2006 @ 09:00 AM
    Posts
    2,894
    It might be a good shot to get the PADI cert first to see if you can actually do scuba diving before leaping into a commercial course.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    dirtydog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pattaya Jomtien
    Posts
    58,779
    I remember 20 years ago the commercial course was nearly 2,000 pounds, it has probably gone up a bit since then BUT, you can earn real good money if you do that sort of work

  7. #7
    Bubbly Sales Girl
    Ice Maiden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Last Online
    06-06-2013 @ 05:40 AM
    Location
    Grimsby
    Posts
    2,594
    I have a phobia of the sea so I cant dive.

    I tried to once but as soon as I got into the water I was panic stricken and had to get out.

  8. #8
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    I asked this elsewhere and got ignored; Really, it's OK, I'm used to it.
    I've got SSI certification. Would prefer PADI certs, Is there any portion of the SSI course I can transfer over to get PADI certs? Can I challenge the some of the courses?

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat
    dirtydog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pattaya Jomtien
    Posts
    58,779
    Divethai vbmenu_register("postmenu_195838", true);
    Newbie

    Last Online: Today 04:56 PM
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Posts: 11

    (Should I learn to dive in Pattaya?)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by friscofrankie (Should I learn to dive in Pattaya?)
    Is your school PADI, SSI or "other?" What about dive ops for the different certs? I got my Open water cert with SSI, I took three - four days course, went diving. If I wanted to re-cert with PADI would I have to take a full on course or is there some sort of corss over?


    We are a PADI 5 Star diving center. You will need to bring in your card or certification from SSI, take PADI open water diver Final exam, and do a 1 day scuba review. We would then be able to certify you thru PADI

  10. #10
    Northern Hermit
    friscofrankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiangmai, Thailand
    Posts
    7,527
    YEah yeah yeah, so I wasn't payin attention. Swear, I looked and looked for that response

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    60,020
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie View Post
    I asked this elsewhere and got ignored; Really, it's OK, I'm used to it.
    I've got SSI certification. Would prefer PADI certs, Is there any portion of the SSI course I can transfer over to get PADI certs? Can I challenge the some of the courses?
    is that really that big an issue ? I've got a NAUI certification - and its apprears to be the equivalent of the PADI.......

    well at least i've never been questioned about it.

    Mind, it was also a week course - 4 days with a day spare in case of bad weather, swimming pool intro, seas dives, boat dives, thoery tests etc.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    60,020
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie View Post
    YEah yeah yeah, so I wasn't payin attention. Swear, I looked and looked for that response
    leave him alone dog - he's a resident amerikan hippy dude! cant be expected to retain anything much longer than 15 mintues most days ....


  13. #13
    Newbie Divethai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    25-01-2007 @ 10:40 AM
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by kingwillyhggtb View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie View Post
    I asked this elsewhere and got ignored; Really, it's OK, I'm used to it.
    I've got SSI certification. Would prefer PADI certs, Is there any portion of the SSI course I can transfer over to get PADI certs? Can I challenge the some of the courses?
    is that really that big an issue ? I've got a NAUI certification - and its apprears to be the equivalent of the PADI.......

    well at least i've never been questioned about it.

    Mind, it was also a week course - 4 days with a day spare in case of bad weather, swimming pool intro, seas dives, boat dives, thoery tests etc.
    The only problem with Naui certs is that Naui is not big over here, So if you wanted to add specialty's it would be harder, I am not aware of any Naui shops here in Pattaya but as I am a PADI shop owner, I never really looked for 1.

  14. #14
    Newbie Divethai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    25-01-2007 @ 10:40 AM
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydog View Post
    Divethai vbmenu_register("postmenu_195838", true);
    Newbie

    Last Online: Today 04:56 PM
    Join Date: Oct 2006
    Posts: 11

    (Should I learn to dive in Pattaya?)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by friscofrankie (Should I learn to dive in Pattaya?)
    Is your school PADI, SSI or "other?" What about dive ops for the different certs? I got my Open water cert with SSI, I took three - four days course, went diving. If I wanted to re-cert with PADI would I have to take a full on course or is there some sort of corss over?


    We are a PADI 5 Star diving center. You will need to bring in your card or certification from SSI, take PADI open water diver Final exam, and do a 1 day scuba review. We would then be able to certify you thru PADI

    Thanks for answering, I was on yesterday and somehow missed this post.

  15. #15
    Member BillyZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    08-08-2017 @ 08:45 AM
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Posts
    448
    I'm a former commercial diver and can answer some questions in that area.

    You do need at least a basic SCUBA cert to get into the school. Nowadays, it's a big business, pumping out commercial divers, and you'll spend a lot of money going through it. When you get out, you'll be a tender making the least amount of money, holding the diver's hose in all weather and doing a lot of grunt work.

    If you're lucky, you'll get a lot of grunt dives along the way and break out in a year or 18 months. There is a lot of work going on right now, but that's not to say that there will be in a few year's time and that you'll make back what you spent on school. However, if you do the schooling through a reputable school, you will probably end up with a decent degree which you may be able to use for other jobs. I know Highline in Washington state has a 2 year course that gives a degree. Also Santa Barbara (sorry, I don't know about the U.K. schools.

    The real money is made on 'depth pay' which is usually scaled on 50' increments. So 0-50 is free. 50'-100' is something like $1 a foot. 100'-150' is $2 a foot, etc. That's money on top of your day rate.

    And the best pay is in SAT(uration) diving. This pays something like $700 a day and up. But you're in a tube for upto a month at a time. It's great money. But for me, the trade off in quality of life isn't really worth it.

    Diving was good for me from 1989-1997 and it helped get me into wellheads, which is what I'm doing in Sattahip now. There is usually good camaraderie and good memories.

    I've got buddies who are still diving now and they are busy. Working all over the place and making decent money.

    If you're American, you'll find it very hard to find work outside of the States due to the Jones Act (you'll have to Google it for details). All other nationalities can pretty much work most anywhere. I was 'lucky' in that I was able to work in Nigeria for 5 years (4 as a diver). That helped my international career. And I've only lived in the States for a year since then.

    My SCUBA certification is SSI, which is popular in Southern California. It's also common in the Middle East.

    Honestly, I see a lot of the new teaching as a bit of over kill. People are being taught very conservative rules and not a lot of common sense.

    One example is one time we were on a (standard U.S. Navy table)no D dive, something like 60' for 50 minutes, and the people we were diving with (PADI or NAUI) said that we had to do a 3 meter stop for 5 minutes. We got to the rope on the boat and the seas were a good meter and a half. Everyone was flopping around in the water. After about 15 seconds of this, my commercial diver friend and me said bollocks to this and went up. We didn't get the bends. The ones who waited in the surf came up somewhat battered...The point is that the standard U.S. Navy tables are considered pretty safe and reliable (save for the 170' table which has bent more than a few commercial divers) and the new procedure that they'd been taught was more dangerous to them that just going straight up.

    (It may have changed since I was diving. But back then, all of the commercial diving companies (and SSI's, when I got SCUBA certified) tables were based on, and closely followed, the Navy tables. That's a lot of 'proving' of the success of those tables.)

    Another time a guy said that we had to wait 48 hours before we could fly. We'd just been doing regular diving, not even any in-water decompression. Standard, at least for that time, was that after 24 hours you're 'clean'. If you'd been doing decompression in a chamber or SAT, ok, then you would want to wait 48 hours.

    I guess it doesn't hurt to be ultra safe with 'newbies'. But it irks me when I've got some guy who's done 17 dives, has a florescent wet suit and computers hanging off of him and is "going to be a Master Diver!" telling me how to dive when I've got over a month of bottom time over 8 years. Not a lot compared to some SCUBA divers, but I'm not a rookie.

    Slack the diver.
    My penis isn't breathing. Do you know CPR?

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    27-11-2006 @ 09:00 AM
    Posts
    2,894
    I think you've hit on why the accelerated courses are so dangerous. I think they try to make up with very conservative procedures what they lack in teaching diving skills. I'm always amazed at how many certified divers seem to have absolutely no buoyancy control, are poor underwater swimmers and, in fact, tend to swim way too much. (If you want to swim, try a lap pool.) But it takes time to teach and learn this skills; and it just can't be done over a weekend.

    But then again, it's all about money, isn't it?

  17. #17
    Newbie Divethai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    25-01-2007 @ 10:40 AM
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by buadhai View Post
    I think you've hit on why the accelerated courses are so dangerous. I think they try to make up with very conservative procedures what they lack in teaching diving skills. I'm always amazed at how many certified divers seem to have absolutely no buoyancy control, are poor underwater swimmers and, in fact, tend to swim way too much. (If you want to swim, try a lap pool.) But it takes time to teach and learn this skills; and it just can't be done over a weekend.

    But then again, it's all about money, isn't it?

    The other side of the coin is how many people will pay for an extended courses to learn all the skills that are developed over say 100 dives? Most people don't want to take wreck skills courses or even 1 on navigation. So if you have to find a comfortable balance. 1 that will teach enough so they can continue to dive and improve.

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
    dirtydog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Pattaya Jomtien
    Posts
    58,779
    Actually it is a bit like driving a car, most people do 20 hours of tuition and can then legally drive, only a very minor amount of people have extra tuition after passing their test, 4 or more years after passing my driving test I spent about 6 months/ 4 hours per week to learn to improve my driving, shame all the cars are now front wheel drive nowadays though

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    27-11-2006 @ 09:00 AM
    Posts
    2,894
    I guess I'm jaded by my years on Saipan where most of the tourists are Japanese on a three day holiday. So many of them do their intro dive course in that time, get certified and then don't dive again until next year's three day vacation. They never really develop dive skills and some of them can barely swim, yet they're taken on difficult dives like The Grotto which can be deep and overhead. It's frightening to watch them dive.

  20. #20
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    11-09-2007 @ 11:11 AM
    Posts
    9
    what is the quickest course to receiving certification?

  21. #21
    Member Shakatak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    03-07-2009 @ 08:05 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    74
    Since I am about to embark into diving course, which I understand that I will have to do my Open Water course first, my question is how long a duration does one take from an open water diver to becomes an instructor? ??

  22. #22
    RIP
    blackgang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Last Online
    08-07-2010 @ 08:33 PM
    Location
    Phetchabun city
    Posts
    15,471
    Guy sure wouldn't want to rush a thing like that.
    I would say at least 2 days, maybe 3 if you didn't go into to many bars and girly joints.

  23. #23
    Mea-Culpa
    Dalton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Last Online
    23-09-2012 @ 12:27 AM
    Location
    In the sticks.
    Posts
    7,392
    Quote Originally Posted by Shakatak
    Since I am about to embark into diving course, which I understand that I will have to do my Open Water course first, my question is how long a duration does one take from an open water diver to becomes an instructor? ??
    Up to rescue, goes fairly quick, Master-diver takes longer, and to become an instructor, I'm pretty sure that you need to have an X amount of dives and experience to achive that. I made it to rescue-diver, the I had no more time.

  24. #24
    My kind of town
    chitown's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,523
    Hey Dive THai, your website seems to be messed up.

  25. #25
    I am in Jail
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    16-06-2008 @ 09:44 PM
    Location
    Thailand
    Posts
    171
    Great informative post.

    A Guy I used to work with was a ex Navy SEAL and he had a funny story about when he got out of the service and he wanted to do a few rec dives with his family in Florida and they would not let him even rent tanks cause he did not have a silly little PADI or NAUI open water cert. card.


    Imagine that.



    Quote Originally Posted by BillyZ View Post
    I'm a former commercial diver and can answer some questions in that area.

    You do need at least a basic SCUBA cert to get into the school. Nowadays, it's a big business, pumping out commercial divers, and you'll spend a lot of money going through it. When you get out, you'll be a tender making the least amount of money, holding the diver's hose in all weather and doing a lot of grunt work.

    If you're lucky, you'll get a lot of grunt dives along the way and break out in a year or 18 months. There is a lot of work going on right now, but that's not to say that there will be in a few year's time and that you'll make back what you spent on school. However, if you do the schooling through a reputable school, you will probably end up with a decent degree which you may be able to use for other jobs. I know Highline in Washington state has a 2 year course that gives a degree. Also Santa Barbara (sorry, I don't know about the U.K. schools.

    The real money is made on 'depth pay' which is usually scaled on 50' increments. So 0-50 is free. 50'-100' is something like $1 a foot. 100'-150' is $2 a foot, etc. That's money on top of your day rate.

    And the best pay is in SAT(uration) diving. This pays something like $700 a day and up. But you're in a tube for upto a month at a time. It's great money. But for me, the trade off in quality of life isn't really worth it.

    Diving was good for me from 1989-1997 and it helped get me into wellheads, which is what I'm doing in Sattahip now. There is usually good camaraderie and good memories.

    I've got buddies who are still diving now and they are busy. Working all over the place and making decent money.

    If you're American, you'll find it very hard to find work outside of the States due to the Jones Act (you'll have to Google it for details). All other nationalities can pretty much work most anywhere. I was 'lucky' in that I was able to work in Nigeria for 5 years (4 as a diver). That helped my international career. And I've only lived in the States for a year since then.

    My SCUBA certification is SSI, which is popular in Southern California. It's also common in the Middle East.

    Honestly, I see a lot of the new teaching as a bit of over kill. People are being taught very conservative rules and not a lot of common sense.

    One example is one time we were on a (standard U.S. Navy table)no D dive, something like 60' for 50 minutes, and the people we were diving with (PADI or NAUI) said that we had to do a 3 meter stop for 5 minutes. We got to the rope on the boat and the seas were a good meter and a half. Everyone was flopping around in the water. After about 15 seconds of this, my commercial diver friend and me said bollocks to this and went up. We didn't get the bends. The ones who waited in the surf came up somewhat battered...The point is that the standard U.S. Navy tables are considered pretty safe and reliable (save for the 170' table which has bent more than a few commercial divers) and the new procedure that they'd been taught was more dangerous to them that just going straight up.

    (It may have changed since I was diving. But back then, all of the commercial diving companies (and SSI's, when I got SCUBA certified) tables were based on, and closely followed, the Navy tables. That's a lot of 'proving' of the success of those tables.)

    Another time a guy said that we had to wait 48 hours before we could fly. We'd just been doing regular diving, not even any in-water decompression. Standard, at least for that time, was that after 24 hours you're 'clean'. If you'd been doing decompression in a chamber or SAT, ok, then you would want to wait 48 hours.

    I guess it doesn't hurt to be ultra safe with 'newbies'. But it irks me when I've got some guy who's done 17 dives, has a florescent wet suit and computers hanging off of him and is "going to be a Master Diver!" telling me how to dive when I've got over a month of bottom time over 8 years. Not a lot compared to some SCUBA divers, but I'm not a rookie.

    Slack the diver.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •