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  1. #1
    Newbie toadilyinsan's Avatar
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    Hookah Diving/ Beach Dives

    Is there any where you can rent a hookah (browning 3rd lung or Airline). I like to dive but I no longer like to go deep and the hookah is easier then messing with tanks.
    Also are there any good reefs off the beaches? For Snorkeling

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    Nothing good over here cept pussy and it getting bad over here so don't come here and expect a good time or even set your heart on getting away alive and with your money,, All they want is your cash, Phuket is now 2000 baht for a cab from the port to town.
    Go out to Lake Mead and gig a bass or 2 and take em home and eat em, and drive out to Ash Meadows for pussy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by toadilyinsan View Post
    Is there any where you can rent a hookah (browning 3rd lung or Airline). I like to dive but I no longer like to go deep and the hookah is easier then messing with tanks.
    Also are there any good reefs off the beaches? For Snorkeling


    Try a search for "SNUBA". This will get you started:

    SNUBA® Thailand - Go Beyond Snorkeling!™ Phi Phi and Phuket SNUBA® Dive Tours with ALOHA SNUBA Thailand.

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    Newbie toadilyinsan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by toadilyinsan View Post
    Is there any where you can rent a hookah (browning 3rd lung or Airline). I like to dive but I no longer like to go deep and the hookah is easier then messing with tanks.
    Also are there any good reefs off the beaches? For Snorkeling


    Try a search for "SNUBA". This will get you started:

    SNUBA® Thailand - Go Beyond Snorkeling!™ Phi Phi and Phuket SNUBA® Dive Tours with ALOHA SNUBA Thailand.
    thanks for the link, SNUBA is like the cheap version though, with the others you can get to the 80' but I like to stay in the 40' range. But I will do it if I can not find others.
    Saved the link, thanks again.

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    blackgang's Avatar
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    40' and you can't get in much trouble, but with unlimited time at 80' you could find your self in a world of shit.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    40' and you can't get in much trouble, but with unlimited time at 80' you could find your self in a world of shit.
    Hmm. Don't think so. In SAS (surface air supplied) the supplied air is at surface pressure, and so you can stay down till your legs drop off if you want. Its breathing pressurized gasses thats the problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    Its breathing pressurized gasses thats the problem.
    Wrong, at 80' you are under 3 atmos of pressure, so say 40# PSI and the air in your lungs is compressed down from 7 pints to 1 pint, the nitrogen in your blood is built to that pressure and you are allowed less than 15 minutes at that pressure before you will have to go thru stage decompression on your way back up.
    It has been to long since I did any diving, but I do know that you will never get in trouble if you use 1 72 cu.ft tank as it will not last over about 12 minutes at 100 feet and if you get another tank and go back down to that depth you will have to do some stage decompression or some time in the chamber on coming back to surface pressure of 14.7 PSI.
    You would never be able to breath air at atmos pressure if you are at more than about 10 feet under.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    Its breathing pressurized gasses thats the problem.
    Wrong, at 80' you are under 3 atmos of pressure, so say 40# PSI and the air in your lungs is compressed down from 7 pints to 1 pint, the nitrogen in your blood is built to that pressure and you are allowed less than 15 minutes at that pressure before you will have to go thru stage decompression on your way back up.
    .
    Hmm. Why don't you have a quick think about why free divers don't get bent?

    Point is in regular diving, you are breathing a gas at a higher ambient pressure, with a resultant higher partial pressure of N2. Thats what causes you to get bent if you come up too quick. Youre tissues saturate to the new higher partial pressure as a result from breathing the air at the same ambient pressure as yours surrounding.

    I am not into commercial diving, but as far as I am aware, they can be surface supplied, and can stay as long as they want. The critical factor is is the gas you are breathing at depth pressurized or not.

    I don't normally think in feet, but 80 feet is 25 or so meters. I agree thats almost certainly too deep for non comercial surface supplied, but would take a good bet that its within range of commercial surface air supplied (properly suited).

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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    Hmm. Why don't you have a quick think about why free divers don't get bent?
    Why don't you have a quick think about how long a free diver is down there, I did say that you are allowed about 15 mns at 100 feet before saturation of your blood requires decompression time.

    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    I am not into commercial diving, but as far as I am aware, they can be surface supplied, and can stay as long as they want. The critical factor is is the gas you are breathing at depth pressurized or not.
    Think what you are talking about.
    Hardhat divers and surface fed hose divers are required to have decomp time either in the water on the way up or immediately into a decomp chamber.
    The tables were figured out long before SCUBA was ever invented by hard hat divers who had got the bends and figured out how to prevent it, it has nothing to do with how you get the air as it is breathed at ambient pressures, thats what a scuba regulator does, it breaks the pressure down to what ever the pressure is at depth.
    you can only breath atmos air down so far and then it has to be a mixture of other gas's, saturation divers stay down and live in a chamber for days at a time.
    It has been to many years since I was a diver and I have no idea what gas they use now and have never been around that deep work, but I have had to tend decomp chambers and divers when working offshore and our divers were only fed atmos air as they were working less than 150 feet.
    But my last work as a diver was in 1965, and my sinus had got so bad that I gave it up as I was making plenty of money anyway.

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    Free divers don't get bent because they only have one lung full of air to disolve into their blood (and body tissues) and then precipitate on their way back up.

    Spend unlimited time at 80' breathing through a hose and your blood would fizz like an opened bottle of coca cola when you came up.

    The critical factor is that your body is pressurised at depth and there fore so is any gas that goes into it.
    Last edited by TizMe; 02-07-2009 at 10:26 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg

    Hmm. Why don't you have a quick think about why free divers don't get bent?
    Why don't you have a quick think about how long a free diver is down there, I did say that you are allowed about 15 mns at 100 feet before saturation of your blood requires decompression time.
    Ok. Lets look at that. 15 minutes at 100 feet. thats 30 meters.

    the current, no limits free diving record is 250 METERS. Thats 820 FEET. Eight hundred plus feet!

    Which by your logic, would be impossible without them getting bent WELL before they reached half that depth (or mre correctly came back up from that depth) - or as the other poster said "having their blood fizzle like champagne".

    It does not happen.

    Look, YOU don't get pressurized. You don't shrink on the way down do you? 2 meters tall at surface, 1 meter tall at 30 feet (2 atms) etc???

    Your TISSUES get saturated at the higher partial pressure of the gasses in the air you breath UNDER PRESSURE. Thats breathing a GAS under pressure, not YOU are under pressure!

    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post


    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    I am not into commercial diving, but as far as I am aware, they can be surface supplied, and can stay as long as they want. The critical factor is is the gas you are breathing at depth pressurized or not.
    Think what you are talking about.
    Hardhat divers and surface fed hose divers are required to have decomp time either in the water on the way up or immediately into a decomp chamber.
    The tables were figured out long before SCUBA was ever invented by hard hat divers who had got the bends and figured out how to prevent it, it has nothing to do with how you get the air as it is breathed at ambient pressures, thats what a scuba regulator does, it breaks the pressure down to what ever the pressure is at depth.
    you can only breath atmos air down so far and then it has to be a mixture of other gas's, saturation divers stay down and live in a chamber for days at a time.
    It has been to many years since I was a diver and I have no idea what gas they use now and have never been around that deep work, but I have had to tend decomp chambers and divers when working offshore and our divers were only fed atmos air as they were working less than 150 feet.
    But my last work as a diver was in 1965, and my sinus had got so bad that I gave it up as I was making plenty of money anyway.
    OK. I have read further. Both hookah and hard hat use PRESSURIZED (compressed) gasses. hence, you are correct in that they would have limits and times. I thought (incorrectly) hookah supplied at 1ata.

    As noted, the differecne between free diving and others is that that free diving does not involved pressurized or compressed gasses, and hence, limits on depth etc do not apply. Nor is there a "real" time limit - only how long you can hold your breath.

    If a free diver has a problem (down at 200 meters) they can take pressurized gas from a support diver - then the tables and limits come into force, and they would be required to stage themselves back slowly.

  12. #12
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    I thought this was about Daffney taking a chick diving....sorry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    OK. I have read further. Both hookah and hard hat use PRESSURIZED (compressed) gasses. hence, you are correct in that they would have limits and times. I thought (incorrectly) hookah supplied at 1ata.
    Jesus Christ, it's about time you came to, I was wondering how long you could remain in a coma, how old are you anyway?

    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    Look, YOU don't get pressurized. You don't shrink on the way down do you? 2 meters tall at surface, 1 meter tall at 30 feet (2 atms) etc???
    You do get pressurized or you would cave in like an empty beer can
    That is why the air in your lungs at 100 feet is compressed to 1 pint in volume and with full lungs coming up without breathing out your lungs will blow up and you will bleed to death and drown in your own blood.

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    Of course you get pressurised, you don't shrink (other than your lungs and air passages) just as the liquid in a bottle of champaine doesn't shrink when its under pressure.

    That's also the reason why you should never hold your breath during the assent (unless you are freediving) because your lungs may explode.

    A free diver at great depth actually has their lungs contract due to the outside water pressure. Just the same if you filled a balloon and took it down with you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg
    I thought (incorrectly) hookah supplied at 1ata.
    If it was supplied at 1 atmosphere pressure then at 100 feet the air hose would be trying to suck up your insides like a vaccuum cleaner.

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    You are right on every point TIZ.
    Thats why that big tank thing on top of the TRIESTE was just a flotation chamber full of gasoline, which is much lighter than water, being full of liquid kept it from collapsing and the gasoline was a float to bring it back from depth.
    The bathysphere underneath was the actual diving chamber.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe View Post
    Of course you get pressurised, you don't shrink (other than your lungs and air passages) just as the liquid in a bottle of champaine doesn't shrink when its under pressure.

    That's also the reason why you should never hold your breath during the assent (unless you are freediving) because your lungs may explode.

    A free diver at great depth actually has their lungs contract due to the outside water pressure. Just the same if you filled a balloon and took it down with you.

    No. You don't get "pressurized". The air inside you does. Especially in the airspaces (i.e the need to equalize your sinus spaces on a descent).

    Both of you should go have a good look around and look at 1 ata diving suits. The so called JIM suits (named after Jim jarret) which will help you get started.

    or think about the people in a submarine.

  18. #18
    Newbie stevenl's Avatar
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    Ok. Lets look at that. 15 minutes at 100 feet. thats 30 meters.

    the current, no limits free diving record is 250 METERS. Thats 820 FEET. Eight hundred plus feet!

    Which by your logic, would be impossible without them getting bent WELL before they reached half that depth (or mre correctly came back up from that depth) - or as the other poster said "having their blood fizzle like champagne".

    It does not happen.
    Are yopu sure you're a certified diver?

    The free diver does not breathe air while under water. The SAS diver does, so yes, he can get 'the bends'. Whether the tanks the diver is breathing from does not matter at all, the airbag the diver is breathing into, in this case the lungs, are all that matters.

    The people in a submarine are under normal pressure.

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    A submarine would have to be pressurised just like an airplane is only in reverse. If it wasn't then submariners would also need to go through decompression or suffer the consequenseces.

    They would also suffer from nitrogen narcosis and oxygen poisoning at depth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenl
    Are yopu sure you're a certified diver?
    I presume that you asked that question to Nidhogg, and I do not think that he has ever been in water over the soles of his feet, seems to have no logical thought either so must be a Thai.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by stevenl
    Are yopu sure you're a certified diver?
    I presume that you asked that question to Nidhogg, and I do not think that he has ever been in water over the soles of his feet, seems to have no logical thought either so must be a Thai.
    As astute as ever BG. You got me figured to a "t".

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    Well here kid, open this link and read it and maybe you will understand what we have been trying to tell/explain to you for the past few days,

    Dive Tables
    Dive Tables
    Before the invention of the Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus the only divers were surface supplied, or hard hat divers. These divers preformed tasks at set depths, meaning they spent their entire dive at one depth. All of their decompression status, and any decompression stop execution, were preformed by diver tenders. Once freedom of the surface was achieved, the diver was free to move about at any depth he wanted, for any time he fancied, within reason. This produced the need of the diver to monitor his own bottom time, and depth, to determine his decompression status. In a surface supplied diving, depth, and bottom time were all controlled by the surface support tenders. Now the Scuba diver has to monitor all this. This produced the need for the Scuba divers to monitor, or determine decompression status underwater. Without the unlimited air supply of the surface compressor, the Scuba diver has to return to the surface for fresh tanks, thus repetitive diving, rarely done by hard hat divers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blackgang View Post
    Well here kid, open this link and read it and maybe you will understand what we have been trying to tell/explain to you for the past few days,

    Dive Tables
    Dive Tables
    Gee thank pop. I am sure you could use those. Not understand them of course, which is what I have been trying (without sucess) to tell you over the last few days.

    Unless you can meaningfully move this discussion into one using partial pressures of gases, we are both wasting our time.

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    I was a trained diver while in the USCG and after my discharge for a few years I was a salvage/commercial diver, so I do understand the tables and do understand what we are talking about, and it seems that you never will understand it because everyone else that has posted in this thread seems to understand what is going on.

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    OK. Here is the absolute essence of diving, as well as those tables:

    Henry's Law states that "The amount of any given gas that will dissolve in a liquid at a given temperature is a function of the partial pressure of that gas in contact with the liquid..." What this means for divers is that gas molecules will dissolve into the blood in proportion to the partial pressure of that gas in the lungs.

    Now, tell me again about who it is thats bullshitting?

    Actually, on second thoughts, you really do not know how ignorant you are.

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