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  1. #101
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    USAGE In precise usage, continual means 'frequent, repeating at intervals' and continuous means 'going on without pause or interruption':: we suffered from the continual attacks of mosquitoes; | the waterfall’s continuous flow creates an endless roar. The most common error is the use of continuous where continual is meant: | continual (that is, 'intermittent') rain or tantrums can be tolerated; continuous (that is, 'uninterrupted') rain or tantrums cannot be tolerated. To prevent misunderstanding, some careful writers use | intermittent instead of continual, and | uninterrupted in place of continuous. Continuous is the word to use in describing spatial relationships, as in | a continuous series of rooms or | a continuous plain of arable land. Avoid using continuous or continuously as a way of describing something that occurs at regular or seasonal intervals: in the sentence, | our synagogue’s Hanukkah candle-lighting ceremony has been held continuously since 1925, the word continuously should be replaced with annually.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiangMai noon
    Excellent work me. that's number 48 up.
    Don't forget to report it in your century thread thread so you get one post more there as well.

  3. #103
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    I like constantly. Perpetually. Non-stop. Unending. Always. All the f*ing time.

  4. #104
    たのむよ。
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    When I tickle Sandra, she says "You are so flirt" which makes me stop and wince with my eyes screwed up tight and my mouth like I have bitten into a lemon.

    Then she tells me to shut up and that I know nothing about English.

    She also pronounces 'anus', 'anoose' - do you have any words of wisdom that could improve our communications?
    "I'm an outsider by choice, but not truly. It's the unpleasantness of the system that keeps me out. I'd rather be in, in a good system. That's where my discontent comes from: being forced to choose to stay outside.
    My advice: Just keep movin' straight ahead. Every now and then you find yourself in a different place."

    George Carlin

  5. #105
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    Just say 'anal' instead and you'll avoid that problem altogether.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiangMai noon View Post
    ^
    Thanks for boosting the thread so hootad.
    it is meant to be light hearted.

    I base my observations on the lack of perfect usage on teahers that strugle with it more than students especially in regard to the yets and already's.
    also movies and HBO series.
    i think ur credibility as a language consultant is somewhat lacking....

  7. #107
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    Michael Lewis says in The English Verb that the use of the past simple denotes remoteness. Usually it's remoteness in time (as in I shat a big one yesterday morning), but it can also be social remoteness (which is where overly polite hotel receptionists ask you "What name was it, sir?") or remoteness from reality (which is why it's used in unreal conditionals, such as "If I were you..."). In the other example ("I would imagine he knew by now"), the speaker is distancing himself from the possibility of being wrong - another form of remoteness.

    *do not under any circumstances attempt to explain this to Thai learners*

    The sleep of reason brings forth monsters.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by benbaaa
    *do not under any circumstances attempt to explain this to Thai learners*
    or the Welsh I suspect...

  9. #109
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    ^ Quite.

  10. #110
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    A grammar question :

    When writing what somebody is saying, does the punctuation go inside or outside of the quotation marks & should a capital letter be used?

    He said, "What day is it?"?

    Also, is the use of a comma before the words 'because' or after 'and' right or wrong?

  11. #111
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    He said, "What day is it?"

    Did he say, "What day is it?"?

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by keda
    He said, "What day is it?"
    Somehow this always bothers me. I realize it's a typographical convention, but as a logic guy, I want tags to be balanced. Sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period or question mark. The sentence above ends with neither. To me, that sentence is the equivalent of something like:


    [........(........])

    It just doesn't look right....

    How can you end the sentence (with the question mark) before you end the quote that is embedded in the sentence?

  13. #113
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    He said, "What day is it?"

    The quotation marks enclose the quote, which in this case is issued as a question.

    Now, is, "He said, "What day is it""? grammatically correct?

    Or, is, "He said, "What day is it.""? more precise?

  14. #114
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    It's stuff like this that makes me realise I was never cut out to teach.

  15. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by shehiredahitman View Post
    The Star Trek phrase 'to boldly go where no man, etc' is grammatically incorrect.

    It should be 'to go boldly'.

    Grates on me that does.
    Split infinitive

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by benbaaa View Post
    Michael Lewis says in The English Verb that the use of the past simple denotes remoteness. Usually it's remoteness in time (as in I shat a big one yesterday morning), but it can also be social remoteness (which is where overly polite hotel receptionists ask you "What name was it, sir?") or remoteness from reality (which is why it's used in unreal conditionals, such as "If I were you..."). In the other example ("I would imagine he knew by now"), the speaker is distancing himself from the possibility of being wrong - another form of remoteness.

    *do not under any circumstances attempt to explain this to Thai learners*

    Or you could just say that it is a "preposition" , Either adjectival or adverbial. It depends on what the context is within the sentence

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by shehiredahitman View Post
    A grammar question :

    When writing what somebody is saying, does the punctuation go inside or outside of the quotation marks & should a capital letter be used?

    He said, "What day is it?"?

    Also, is the use of a comma before the words 'because' or after 'and' right or wrong?
    It depends whether it is direct or reported speech. Direct is as if someone is asking a question to you or an other. Reported is when it is written as in a newspaper. Direct speech has the syntax inside the quotation marks as you have correctly written in your post. I think,
    Last edited by Breny; 25-09-2012 at 07:56 PM.

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