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  1. #5251
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    dirk diggler's Avatar
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    You can buy any brand as long as it’s a Triumph!

  2. #5252
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    Anyone else who might know something and can be a little more constructive about Japanese cruisers?
    Obviously not TGs thing since he doesn't own one and from his comments has no experience on Japanese cruisers bikes.
    If you've done much of your riding in the U.K. and Europe you may not be use to the fact we drive further in Oz to get the milk than you poms do on a weekend tour through Pomogolia. My next little road trip in Oz is planned from North Qld to Melbourne. About 4,500k/m direct round trip without any side trips. You would be unused to the fact of riding hundreds of k/m between towns which may consist of a pub and petrol station and nothing in between, let alone in the heat over that distance which can get over 40C inland and where you can be days waiting for a part, so absolute reliability isn't so crucial as it is in Oz.
    I don't need to own a Harley which in my opinion is vastly over priced for the quality reliability and technology you get, compared to a vastly technologically superior Japanese bike. In saying that some Harleys look nice but dont fit my criteria as stated. I ride for the love of it not to be an attention seeking poser with a loud exhaust. I like comfort and smoothness reliability and easy parts access if needed and if nobody notices me that's fine, I ride to notice not to be noticed. I prefer the more advanced technology that goes into Japanese bikes but each to their own. After nearly 50 years of riding I dont feel I have much to prove.

  3. #5253
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    I dig what you are saying, but don't get the idea that EVERYBODY who rides a Hardley Dingleburg is a poser.
    I can assure you of that.
    Plus don't go on about technological superior, advanced technology, smoothness, etc etc, when the bikes you mentioned are all COPYING the Harley look , design and trying to design "unsmoothness" and "rough character" into the bikes themselves.
    If you want any of what you quoted you would be looking at GS 1200 Beemers, K series Beemers, VFR 800 Hondas, and Goldwings etc.
    All smooth, all technologically advanced.
    4.5k i've done plenty of times round Europe in 35C heat on air cooled bikes.
    Also modern Harleys are as reliable as any brand name, check out your fellow Ozman on YT, Million Dollar Bogan, and what he gets up to on the things. Impressive.
    And no , i'm not some Harley anti Jap fan boy, i'm just querying your m/c choice.
    No offense, no biggie.
    Me personally, Harley stopped making great big twins in 99, and the last good Sportster was an 03 model. But then i'm a pro m/c mechanic who works on them, and worked on them for a living.

  4. #5254
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    ^^ A friend has had a 900 Vulcan for about 5 years now and still thinks its a great bike. In Thailand its a good choice as parts are cheap if needed, no idea how it would be in Aus. I think its a great looking bike.
    I like looking at cruisers but prefer naked bikes and dual sport. Thank god the manufacturers make so many choices in style to suit the variety of wants and needs.

  5. #5255
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    I would think 900 cc is a little light for two up and luggage, that why I've stuck to 1100cc minimum. If I was doing shorter touring only it may be a good choice. I did look at the Vulcan 1600cc but i have spoken to a couple of guys who own one and they say there is a bit of an issue with heat directing off the motor on to the leg which is not pleasant riding in high ambient temperatures. It also has to be good as a stock standard bike as I am a bit of a traditionalist and like to keep bikes stock standard other than the paint work.

  6. #5256
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    f you want any of what you quoted you would be looking at GS 1200 Beemers, K series Beemers, VFR 800 Hondas, and Goldwings etc.
    All smooth, all technologically advanced.

    As stated I love reliability. B.M.troubleyou are called that for a reason. They along with a couple of other euro bikes are down the low end of every reliability survey I have read. Speaking to BMW lovers apparently the airheads were better than the later models. I believe their was a big problem with the 1600 but that should've been sorted by now. Their parts are expensive and there is a limited dealer network. Harley despite being twice the price and more have also never made it in the top five of any reliability survey I have read either in Europe or Australia.

    4.5k i've done plenty of times round Europe in 35C heat on air cooled bikes.

    Congratulations you have ridden the equivalent of from London to Athens and back and on multiple occasions. That's some riding.
    I have ridden (back in 1975) Melbourne to Perth (3,400 k/m one way) on a Honda K2. Back then there was about 500k/m of dirt road full of wheel ruts between Eucla and Ceduna across the Nullabor plain which is desert from horizon to horizon and then some It was used by cars and road trains and graded one a month It was up to 180 k/m between petrol stops with not even a tree. Break down back then and you could be in serious trouble if someone didn't find you. Did that once but never again.
    Anyway I digress, but hopefully that explains my reasons why I have selected what I have. I respect that as you say you are a working motorcycle mechanic that you have knowledge of motorcycles but as a qualified mechanical engineer I do have some knowledge of engines.

  7. #5257
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    What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-take-my-wife-sleaze-simpsons-episode

    My latest ride

  8. #5258
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    What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-017.jpg

    My latest ride (and has been for the last 20 years), out by the 'kong.

  9. #5259
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    Now it looks like a pissing comp not what bike you own.
    I own a Yamaha Nmax scooter, Riden from Ratchaburi to Phuket in 10 hour with a sore Ars, rested one day then rod the scooter back to Ratchabri.
    It was on my bucket list, give me a car any day.

    PS I have owned a Yamaha SRX 600 super single & Dragstar 1100 in Thailand.
    I very happy on my Yamaha Nmax

  10. #5260
    'ello 'ello 'ello Luigi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    Yamaha SRX 600 super single
    A single cylinder 600. Damn. You wouldn't want to have any fillings. Bet it wouldn't half pull off the line though.

  11. #5261
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luigi View Post
    A single cylinder 600. Damn. You wouldn't want to have any fillings. Bet it wouldn't half pull off the line though.
    You could not get the front wheel to lift when you lurch it of the line
    It was the first single with 4 valves twin Carbe's & double exhaust & kick start
    Max. power 42,0 hp (30,9 kW) / 6500 rpm

    Curb (wet) weight 170 kg / 374 lbs

  12. #5262
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    Why twin carbs ratch? Seems strange for a single I cant think of any advantage. Maybe TG has an answer.

  13. #5263
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    My latest ride (and has been for the last 20 years), out by the 'kong.
    There are many people who seem to love Guzzis The vee config makes them look like a huge engine. The old ones still command a decent price in Oz due to a pretty loyal following. What do you think makes them popular and stand apart from other bikes?

  14. #5264
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    Why twin carbs ratch? Seems strange for a single I cant think of any advantage. Maybe TG has an answer.
    It was one of the first engine to have 4 Valves to 1 piston 2 inlet ports & 2 outlet ports.


  15. #5265
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    Why twin carbs ratch? Seems strange for a single I cant think of any advantage. Maybe TG has an answer.
    It was fairly common on Japanese single cylinder bikes. One carb was smaller and opened at low engine rpm. The second carb was only active at higher engine rpm. It was to keep the inlet manifold velocity high.

  16. #5266
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    Thanks Barty.

  17. #5267
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    You could not get the front wheel to lift when you lurch it of the line
    It was the first single with 4 valves twin Carbe's & double exhaust & kick start
    Max. power 42,0 hp (30,9 kW) / 6500 rpm

    Curb (wet) weight 170 kg / 374 lbs
    Not quite correct.
    4 valve singles such as the 350-500 Rudge and Rudge Ulster were readily available pre war in the 30's.
    Twin port singles were also a popular fashion pre war, faded post war, apart from manufacturers such as Panther with their big 600-650 singles who kept with the design right to the end in the 60's.
    The only thing you got right was maybe the twin carbs on a single, which proved an unneccessary complication, a bit like early EXUP valves on 4 bangers, but kept the EPA guys happy.

    What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-img_20180930_221908.jpg.a53dbe97ebbe4095abe1fd2c53b29612.jpg
    Here's a custom Panther built by a mate of mine and well know fabricator/machinist, Gilbert Sills.

  18. #5268
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaiguzzi View Post
    Not quite correct.
    4 valve singles such as the 350-500 Rudge and Rudge Ulster were readily available pre war in the 30's.
    Twin port singles were also a popular fashion pre war, faded post war, apart from manufacturers such as Panther with their big 600-650 singles who kept with the design right to the end in the 60's.
    The only thing you got right was maybe the twin carbs on a single, which proved an unneccessary complication, a bit like early EXUP valves on 4 bangers, but kept the EPA guys happy.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's a custom Panther built by a mate of mine and well know fabricator/machinist, Gilbert Sills.
    Yes I was wrong.

    Rudge engineer George Hack is said to have taken his design idea from the four-valve
    Triumph Ricardo
    (produced from 192128).

    Jump to search
    Manufacturer Triumph Engineering Co Ltd
    Also called The 'Riccy'
    Production 1921-1928
    Engine 499cc single-cylinder four-valve ohv four-stroke
    Power 20 bhp @ 4600 rpm
    Transmission Triumph three-speed gearbox
    The Triumph Ricardo was a British single-cylinder motorcycle manufactured by the Triumph Engineering Co Ltd between 1921 and 1928. Named after engine designer Sir Harry Ricardo it featured an innovative four valve head design and was capable of over 70 mph, set three world speed records[1] and won a gold medal in 1923 International Six Day Trial.














    Developed around a 499cc single-cylinder four overhead valve four-stroke commissioned by Triumph from engine expert Ricardo, the Triumph Ricardo was a replacement for the aging Triumph side-valves. Ricardo produced a number of prototypes aimed at reducing thermal stress on the inadequate valve materials available, while improving airflow through increased valve area. Harry Ricardo's final design had the four valves operated by the existing tappet mechanism and set a new standard for the power output possible from a 500cc single-cylinder engine, achieving over 20 bhp - the same as a 1500cc car engine of the time.[2] Capable of 70 mph, the four-valve head allowed more efficient gas flow and the spark plug could be positioned in the middle for optimum combustion. Each pair of valves was parallel, at 90 degrees to each other, with the valve stems and springs exposed, as were the long pushrods which ran on the outside of the engine. A light alloy piston ran in a steel cylinder barrel and the cylinder head was made of cast iron.[3]The rest of the cycle parts were based on Triumph's well proven Triumph Model H side-valve. This had a poor reputation for handling, however, and was not really built for the more powerful four valve engine.[3] On later models the oil system (which had relied on a manual hand pump) was replaced with an external oil pump. The 'Riccy' continued in production as a sports model until 1928.


  19. #5269
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    That Panther motor and gearbox assy is like a work of Art. I loved the look of the arial red hunter and of course the brough superior. Beautiful pieces of mechanical engineering. Some of those early british bike engines could be in an art gallery.
    I use to visit an old english guy who had many of these old bikes over the years and had first hand knowledge. Very Interesting. Sadly he started to deteriorate mentally and in 12 months went from a crystal clear memory to needing a nursing home. Another ex navy guy I knew once showed me this box that had just about every original triumph book and manual from the 50s and 60s. Would think they would be worth a dollar by now.

  20. #5270
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    The Triumph stuff, parts books, workshop service manuals have never been out of print.
    Still available today at sensible prices.
    When Meriden went tits up in 83, John Nelson (Triumph employee) bought the rights to publications and became JR Technical publications, still going today.
    Every Triumph twin book 1937-1983 available, from pre war A5 service books to last of the line 4 ring binders.

    What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-014.jpg

    Top shelf here is all unit construction (63 on) big twin workshop service manuals, and all parts books for all twins 350-500-650-750, 1936-83.
    All specialist tooling and tools is still readily available for all Brit bikes today.
    Vincent and Velocette have thriving OC spares schemes, in fact there is very little NOT available new for the Vinnie twins.
    I would go as far to say as the aftermarket parts for Norton, BSA and Triumph today are higher quality than ever before, especially if UK, US made.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-015.jpg  

  21. #5271
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    I thought because they were originals they might be worth something.

  22. #5272
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    looking to buy an XSR 900 early next year, anyone have one that wants to share an opinion on ?

  23. #5273
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    I thought because they were originals they might be worth something.
    Not if they were never out of print.

    There is a book by Don Morley called British Trials Bikes.
    Now that has been out of print for some time, and a relatively low print run.
    I've been chasing a S/H one for some time, never seen one under 50 quid on Ebay.

  24. #5274
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles View Post
    looking to buy an XSR 900 early next year, anyone have one that wants to share an opinion on ?
    Yeah, fucking fantastic.
    Not ridden one, but being a Yamaha fanboy, liking retro looking bikes and loving triples, after watching a bunch of YT and reading up on them, they get rave reviews.
    TBH, prolly too much for Thai roads, because the motor encourages you to go fast, and is not a lot of fun just tootling around.
    IMHO, i'd go for the XSR700, sounds great with a pipe on it, fast enough, characterful motor, still good fun pottering around country lanes.
    Some pics from my XSR computer file;

    Some twins;
    What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-01_03_2017_schlachtwerk_yamaha_xsr700_germnay_street_tracker_pipeburn_custom_motorcycle_01.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-04_07_2017_walzwerk_racing_yamaha_xsr700_faster_sons_tracker_custom_moto_pipeburn_03.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-04_07_2017_walzwerk_racing_yamaha_xsr700_faster_sons_tracker_custom_moto_pipeburn_11.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-22_11_2016_motomax_metz_france_yamaha_xsr700_scrambler_tracker_01.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-xsr-2-web.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-xsr-5-web.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-xsr-3-web.jpg

    And a couple of triples;
    What kind of Motorcycle do you own.-fb9946869da5946288d94f7e334f059f.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-2016-yamaha-xsr900-summer-2018-1.jpgWhat kind of Motorcycle do you own.-2016-yamaha-xsr900-summer-2018-2.jpg

  25. #5275
    'ello 'ello 'ello Luigi's Avatar
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    For anybody that was 16 in the 1990's, Kawa are bringing out a 250cc inline 4.

    With all the 300-400-500cc models out there now (single and twins) it mightn't quite be the cult classic that the CBR250rr was, but would be cool to see a new 400cc inline 4 again in the future perhaps.




    Think that's a mash up from one of those Jap magazines, but they're usually pretty close.

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