Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 58
  1. #26
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    And here was me assuming the rungs would be flat like a step for the foot. But it's obviously much stronger the way he's doing it.
    555. Me too. I walked up and thought....Huh? but as you said, much stronger the way he is doing it

  2. #27
    Thailand Expat
    VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    10,592
    Does he make the rungs or buy them shaped like that?

  3. #28
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    Does he make the rungs or buy them shaped like that?
    He makes them. He has a sander and does the shapes

  4. #29
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724


    After all the rungs are in place, He drills them and then screws them together.



    Screw location.



    Under each rung he carefully ads wire for more strength and support.



    Back into the sun for another day or 2 of drying. The guy will pick the ladder up Monday morning.

    So there you have it, a Thai Bamboo ladder. He leaned it up against the wall and climbed up and bounced on each rung. Quite sound.

    In working with my FIL today he was not really happy with the quality for a couple of reasons and will offer a 200baht discount to the guy and show him what he did not like about it.

    As I followed along on this build I pointed out a few things that I felt would make the ladder even better. He really appreciated the feedback and will try them on the next one. My FIL does everything old school Thai (which is really cool) but I have some tools that make it faster and some hardware installation ideas that will help make it stronger and easier.

  5. #30
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    11,083
    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    My FIL does everything old school Thai (which is really cool)
    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    he was not really happy with the quality for a couple of reasons and will offer a 200baht discount to the guy and show him what he did not like about it.
    Top bloke.

    Thanks for the informative photo-story JP. It was interesting.

  6. #31
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Top bloke.

    Thanks for the informative photo-story JP. It was interesting.
    Thanks, fun to share stuff like this. And I agree my FIL is a top guy. Now in his late 70's man he stays busy and productive.

  7. #32
    Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 02:39 PM
    Posts
    169
    Thats a nice ladder. Your FIL is a true craftsman.

  8. #33
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:30 PM
    Location
    Palace Far from Worries
    Posts
    5,629
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    I recall the old wooden extension ladders, and even wooden step ladders in the west had a wire running up each side, and I think under each rung.
    I forget the detail.
    I did my apprenticeship working for the local Electricity Co.

    We worked up to 33,000 volts.

    The wooden ladder is standard and, when I first started it had the 'wire running up each side'.

    Then a sparkie who had, until his moment in the spotlight had had exceeded the Darwinian principles walked a wooden ladder
    into an overhead live busbar.

    The current travelled down that strengthening wire to the ground ... through him. He survived.


    I met him later. Coke bottle glasses and apparently few/no toes left.

    Ladders with the metal wire were then replaced with a fiberglass reinforcing strip.

    If you see a red stripe running down a sparkie's ladder, that, most likely a non conductive strengthening strip.


    Great thread JPPR2

    We use the Bamboo ladders @ the Farm, though I doubt they are of the quality that your FiL makes.

    Our fingerprints never fade from the lives we touch

  9. #34
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    7,819
    ...thanks for the thread...2 possibly unrelated questions: a) who mows your lawn (or do you keep goats or something)?...and b) is your dog a chocolate lab?...I've seen the ladders used by the electrical authority here in bkk: I always thought they were saving money using bamboo...now I know better (I think)...
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  10. #35
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    a) who mows your lawn (or do you keep goats or something)?
    HAHAHA. I mow the entire property about once a week or so. Great exercise and I like being outdoors.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    b) is your dog a chocolate lab?..
    Yes She is, 9 months old now and a friggen menace around the place. She is like a gazelle and runs like mad.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    thanks for the thread
    ANytime. I like doing picture threads. I have seen many Bamboo ladders but none like my FIL makes with Teak rungs and assembled with good hardware.

  11. #36
    En route
    Cujo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:44 PM
    Location
    Reality.
    Posts
    26,820
    Yes great thread. That ladder looks robust I must say.

  12. #37
    Semi member
    Jack meoff's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    momo's Y-fronts
    Posts
    3,772
    Quality ladder, the ones i've seen used in issan the steps are bamboo nailed on to the sides.

  13. #38
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    11,083
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack meoff View Post
    in issan the steps are bamboo nailed on to the sides.
    Bugger climbing with a sack of cement on your shoulder with that sort of ladder! Nailed on rungs was what we used to do as kids for the tree house. Not good at all.

  14. #39
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    7,819
    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Nailed on rungs was what we used to do as kids for the tree house
    ...I assume the privy was on firmer ground then...

  15. #40
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:33 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    14,888
    Please tell your FIL he is being applauded around the world. Thank you for the thread, along with the DIY photos.

    You mentioned some "tips/techniques" which may be useful, care to share them?

  16. #41
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Please tell your FIL he is being applauded around the world. Thank you for the thread, along with the DIY photos.

    You mentioned some "tips/techniques" which may be useful, care to share them?
    Funny on around the world comment. I will let him know. Knowing him, he will laugh.

    As for the things I suggested, He used the wrong type of screw and way too long and they were shanked meaning there were no threads in the wood rung to hold it. He used sheetrock screws and should use fully threaded Wood screws. I showed him the difference and he agreed. He was using what he had on hand which is understandable. He also used too large of a drill bit for the pilot hole again leaving less thread material to grab the wood on the rung. The other was on the support wire and to use the nail he will use to tighten it up. He spins the wire tightly with a piece of wood then uses a nail to hold in place underneath the rung but it tends to release some tension swapping the nail in for the wood. He then bends the nail over to hold it. If he tightened with the nail then beat it all the way in it would look cleaner and hold tension better. Again just a few subtle things. I climbed up his ladder before it left and was quite strong and no floppy bounce and creak sounds like others I have been on.

  17. #42
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:33 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    14,888
    Well we are, here on TD, an international bunch it seems. All with various backgrounds and some appreciating foreign skills. Your additional suggestions as well deserve credit. Let us know if your FIL adopts them on future ladders. If he does you will get applause, if he doesn't you will get rasberries.

    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  18. #43
    Thailand Expat
    Airportwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 08:21 PM
    Location
    Flat Earth
    Posts
    3,310
    Constructive criticism! why do they space the rungs so far apart? 12" apart would suit me a lot better, especially when you get high up

  19. #44
    Thailand Expat
    Klondyke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 10:54 PM
    Posts
    3,119
    ^ Quite correct, 12" = 1 foot is normal what I know the bamboo ladders are always made with. The shops with bamboo sticks and/or baskets that also deal with such ladders do have a fix rate per rung, i.e. per foot.

  20. #45
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    Constructive criticism! why do they space the rungs so far apart? 12" apart would suit me a lot better, especially when you get high up
    To yours and Klondyke's comments, I did not measure the step separation. I did climb up it and it seemed pretty easy and not like was trying to lift a leg higher then normal. I will check on his ladder and see what he did or does.

  21. #46
    Thailand Expat
    tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    7,819
    ...I notice FIL's missing a toenail...was he interrogated during the war?...

  22. #47
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...I notice FIL's missing a toenail...was he interrogated during the war?...
    HAHAHAHA. He does not have a toenail on both big toes. I asked my wife a long time ago and she told me that was from wearing too small and cheap rubber boots when working building roads from here in Thailand. He constantly lost them and they never grew back.

  23. #48
    Member
    naptownmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Last Online
    23-09-2018 @ 10:31 PM
    Posts
    648
    Cool Pics that's a great skill. There are some very talented Thai's around.

    Can I ask another question about your lawn? Did you use seed or sod and what type. I have a piece I'd like a bit of grass on.

    thanks

  24. #49
    CCBW
    JPPR2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,724
    Quote Originally Posted by naptownmike View Post
    Cool Pics that's a great skill. There are some very talented Thai's around.

    Can I ask another question about your lawn? Did you use seed or sod and what type. I have a piece I'd like a bit of grass on.

    thanks
    Funny. Today the guy that bought the ladder 2 weeks or so ago came back and has ordered 2 more.

    On my lawn, well let me see how I can answer this.

    I basically have 3 types of lawn varieties.

    The 4 areas in the front of the house by the driveway were all SOD. I cannot remember the name of it

    The areas close to the house on both sides and the back are Malaysian grass. It was SOD as well.

    The other areas away from the house are a mix and were there. I did not plant SOD nor seed. I just used some 15/15/15 fertilizer and my Scott's Fertilizer spreader and got it healthy. It also has weeds in it but all looks good after I mow it.

    FWIIW, Areas that see a lot of shade or early or late sun the Malaysian grass is perfect and grows really really well. If it sees sun all day you want the other variety which is a narrow bladed grass and does well in full direct sun.

    Hope that helps

  25. #50
    Thailand Expat
    VocalNeal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Bangkok
    Posts
    10,592
    ^ It's like truning a back yard jungle into a lawn. Mow it, and mow it. Fertilizer. Mow it eventually you will have a lawn from the grass that was already there.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •