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  1. #1
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    Idul Adha - An Indonesian Religious Festival

    I've heard about this before, but never really seen it. Some westerners say it's horrible, blood everywhere, but having grown up Catholic, I understand the concept of sacrifice, and also know of the story of Abraham offering his first born to God.



    Wikipedia had this to say...

    Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى‎ ‘Īdu l-’Aḍḥā) "Festival of Sacrifice" or "Greater Eid" is a holiday celebrated by Muslims (including the Druze) worldwide to commemorate the willingness of Ibrahim to sacrifice his son Ismael as an act of obedience to God.
    Eid al-Adha is the latter of two Eid festivals celebrated by Muslims, whose basis comes from the Quran.[1] Like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha begins with a short prayer followed by a sermon (khuṭba).
    Eid al-Adha annually falls on the 10th day of the month of Dhul Hijja (ذو الحجة) of the lunar Islamic calendar. The festivities last for three days or more depending on the country. Eid al-Adha occurs the day after the pilgrims conducting Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia by Muslims worldwide, descend from Mount Arafat. It happens to be approximately 70 days after the end of the month of Ramadan.

  2. #2
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    Anyway, it's going to be this Friday. (means a longweekend sailing at the club for me) But what happens is that the number of cows and goats around the city begins to increase, they bring them in for this festival, under shops, sides of highways, even under flyovers, everywhere.

    (I'm sure the price for them triples as well, but I've never had cause to buy them)

    So, here is one temporary stall set up near my place.



    The sign says, For sale, Animals for the ceremony, 1. Goats 2. Cows.

  3. #3
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    The man looking at the camera is either the stall staff, or the owner.



    I guess, he just has the animals graze on the side of the road here....

  4. #4
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    a couple more...



    bye bye little goat, you only have to wait till friday and you will not have to be tied up like this on the side of the road anymore....




    Literally, every corner is set up like this.

    Hopefully, some more pics of different stalls, and perhaps a chance on Friday to show you what happens to them all.

  5. #5
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    I'd let them go when he wasn't looking.

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    Here is an article about it in today's Jakarta globe.

    [quote]

    Men preparing goats for sale ahead of Idul Adha. (Photo: Ade Mardiyati, JG)
    Under the Knife For Islamic Holiday

    Asep Syaefullah is quite renowned around the streets of Bendungan Hilir in Central Jakarta. The 53-year-old has worked as a caretaker at a privately-run high school in Benhil for 33 years — but it’s not his day job that has given him special status among Benhil residents.

    For the past 15 years, Asep has been moonlighting as a butcher, particularly for Idul Adha. On this day, Muslims around the world sacrifice animals to commemorate the willingness of the Prophet Ibrahim to surrender his son, Ismael, to God.

    It is said that the prophet dreamed he had killed his son. Believing it was a command from God, Ismael asked his father to carry out his dream. Just as Ismael lay down to be killed, God told Ibrahim not to do so and to sacrifice an animal instead.

    “Go to Pak Asep. He’s the man for the job,” said a member of the Idul Adha committee at a Benhil mosque, when asked if he knew of any butchers in the area who would slaughter an animal as a sacrifice.

    A young mother gave the same answer.

    “Just go and see Pak Asep. He lives over there in the school compound,” she said.

    Short and stocky, with a mustache and beard, Asep seems to fit the general stereotype of a butcher. Together with his younger brother, Usman, the father of two has been a member of the Idul Adha committee at Muhammadiyah secondary school for years.

    “It’s pretty simple,” said Asep when asked about preparing for Idul Adha. “Just sharpen the machete. That’s all.”

    He said a well-kept machete was the most important tool when slaughtering an animal. The animals, he added, should not suffer too much and a keen blade helped to hasten their death.

    “You know how it feels when you accidentally cut your skin on bamboo? The animal should not even feel pain like that,” he said. “That’s why it is very important to prepare the machete.”

    Asep has a special way of checking to see if his machete is up to scratch, one he said he learned from other butchers many years ago.

    “Just run the blade along your hair like you are trimming it,” he said, his right hand drawing the machete over his head. “If you can cut some hair, then you can be sure the machete is ready to use.”

    When slaughtering a goat, he said, one slash is usually enough to cut its throat. But it can take twice the amount of force for cows.

    “A cow’s skin is very thick. You have to slash it a couple of times,” he said. “I can slaughter a goat by myself, but for a cow, I need at least three people to help me.

    “A cow will struggle to free himself. And that’s when they can kick you really hard.”

    Asep knows this all too well. During last year’s Idul Adha, he was kicked in the chest by a cow.

    “[The bruises] didn’t fade for weeks,” he said with a rueful grin.

    Every year, Asep slaughters no less than eight cows and 40 goats on Idul Adha, which falls on the tenth day of Zulhijjah, the 12th month of the Islamic calendar. The backbreaking work is usually completed within three hours.

    “There are two important things when slaughtering an animal for Idul Adha. First, we direct the head of the beast toward the qibla [the direction of the Kaaba, the sacred building in Mecca, to which Muslims turn for prayer]. Second, we have to say ‘Bismillahi Allahu akbar’ [‘In the name of Allah, Allah is great’]. These two things are compulsory.”

    His main duty as a butcher is to slaughter the animals, and he leaves the other tasks, such as skinning and cutting the meat, to other members of the committee.

    “But when I’m done with slaughtering, I can help them with that, too,” he said.

    Krisnandana, a veterinarian from the Veterinary Public Health division at the Ministry of Agriculture, said the ministry recommended butchers follow its guidelines for Idul Adha.

    “In general, the slaughter of an animal should be conducted in a slaughterhouse. However, for religious or personal reasons, it can be done outside, but it should be supervised by a qualified person, such as a veterinarian.”

    He added that the slaughtering should meet the ministry’s hygiene and sanitation requirements: The area should have clean water and holes dug in the ground for blood drainage and to bury the entrails.

    Before Idul Adha, the committee at a local mosque registers the names of poor families in the neighborhood and distributes coupons so that they can receive the meat of the slaughtered animals. The members of the committee are also given some meat for their efforts.

    On the night of Idul Adha, many people use the meat to make holiday dishes, such as sate kambing (skewers of meat with peanut sauce) and goat’s meat and bone soup.

    In addition to Idul Adha, customers also call upon Asep to slaughter goats for aqiqah, the Islamic ritual of shaving a baby’s hair for the first time, usually on the seventh day after birth.

    Asep’s skills with a knife have also taken him further afield, to Bogor, as word of mouth advertises his reputation for slaughtering animals.

    “People tell other people,” he said.

    However, Asep has one rule — he never charges his customers.

    “But they always give me money for doing it,” he said.

    When asked to slaughter a cow, he said, he usually receives Rp 200,000 ($20), and a minimum of Rp 50,000 for goats.

    “But really, I don’t ask for money, let alone set prices,” he said. “It’s for lillahi ta’ala [for the sake of Allah Almighty].”

    When asked if he ever felt bad for the animals, Asep smiled and shook his head.

    “I guess it is part of their fate as an animal,” he said. “I know that slaughtering an animal is part of Islamic teachings, so I don’t regret doing my job.”

    Asep Syaefullah is quite renowned around the streets of Bendungan Hilir in Central Jakarta. The 53-year-old has worked as a caretaker at a privately-run high school in Benhil for 33 years — but it’s not his day job that has given him special status among Benhil residents.

    For the past 15 years, Asep has been moonlighting as a butcher, particularly for Idul Adha. On this day, Muslims around the world sacrifice animals to commemorate the willingness of the Prophet Ibrahim to surrender his son, Ismael, to God.

    It is said that the prophet dreamed he had killed his son. Believing it was a command from God, Ismael asked his father to carry out his dream. Just as Ismael lay down to be killed, God told Ibrahim not to do so and to sacrifice an animal instead.

    “Go to Pak Asep. He’s the man for the job,” said a member of the Idul Adha committee at a Benhil mosque, when asked if he knew of any butchers in the area who would slaughter an animal as a sacrifice.

    A young mother gave the same answer.

    “Just go and see Pak Asep. He lives over there in the school compound,” she said.

    Short and stocky, with a mustache and beard, Asep seems to fit the general stereotype of a butcher. Together with his younger brother, Usman, the father of two has been a member of the Idul Adha committee at Muhammadiyah secondary school for years.

    “It’s pretty simple,” said Asep when asked about preparing for Idul Adha. “Just sharpen the machete. That’s all.”

    He said a well-kept machete was the most important tool when slaughtering an animal. The animals, he added, should not suffer too much and a keen blade helped to hasten their death.

    “You know how it feels when you accidentally cut your skin on bamboo? The animal should not even feel pain like that,” he said. “That’s why it is very important to prepare the machete.”

    Asep has a special way of checking to see if his machete is up to scratch, one he said he learned from other butchers many years ago.

    “Just run the blade along your hair like you are trimming it,” he said, his right hand drawing the machete over his head. “If you can cut some hair, then you can be sure the machete is ready to use.”

    When slaughtering a goat, he said, one slash is usually enough to cut its throat. But it can take twice the amount of force for cows.

    “A cow’s skin is very thick. You have to slash it a couple of times,” he said. “I can slaughter a goat by myself, but for a cow, I need at least three people to help me.

    “A cow will struggle to free himself. And that’s when they can kick you really hard.”

    Asep knows this all too well. During last year’s Idul Adha, he was kicked in the chest by a cow.

    “[The bruises] didn’t fade for weeks,” he said with a rueful grin.

    Every year, Asep slaughters no less than eight cows and 40 goats on Idul Adha, which falls on the tenth day of Zulhijjah, the 12th month of the Islamic calendar. The backbreaking work is usually completed within three hours.

    “There are two important things when slaughtering an animal for Idul Adha. First, we direct the head of the beast toward the qibla [the direction of the Kaaba, the sacred building in Mecca, to which Muslims turn for prayer]. Second, we have to say ‘ Bismillahi Allahu akbar ’ [‘In the name of Allah, Allah is great’]. These two things are compulsory.”

    His main duty as a butcher is to slaughter the animals, and he leaves the other tasks, such as skinning and cutting the meat, to other members of the committee.

    “But when I’m done with slaughtering, I can help them with that, too,” he said.

    Krisnandana, a veterinarian from the Veterinary Public Health division at the Ministry of Agriculture, said the ministry recommended butchers follow its guidelines for Idul Adha.

    “In general, the slaughter of an animal should be conducted in a slaughterhouse. However, for religious or personal reasons, it can be done outside, but it should be supervised by a qualified person, such as a veterinarian.”

    He added that the slaughtering should meet the ministry’s hygiene and sanitation requirements: The area should have clean water and holes dug in the ground for blood drainage and to bury the entrails.

    Before Idul Adha, the committee at a local mosque registers the names of poor families in the neighborhood and distributes coupons so that they can receive the meat of the slaughtered animals. The members of the committee are also given some meat for their efforts.

    On the night of Idul Adha, many people use the meat to make holiday dishes, such as sate kambing (skewers of meat with peanut sauce) and goat’s meat and bone soup.

    In addition to Idul Adha, customers also call upon Asep to slaughter goats for aqiqah , the Islamic ritual of shaving a baby’s hair for the first time, usually on the seventh day after birth.

    Asep’s skills with a knife have also taken him further afield, to Bogor, as word of mouth advertises his reputation for slaughtering animals.

    “People tell other people,” he said.

    However, Asep has one rule — he never charges his customers.

    “But they always give me money for doing it,” he said.

    When asked to slaughter a cow, he said, he usually receives Rp 200,000 ($20), and a minimum of Rp 50,000 for goats.

    “But really, I don’t ask for money, let alone set prices,” he said. “It’s for lillahi ta’ala [for the sake of Allah Almighty].”

    When asked if he ever felt bad for the animals, Asep smiled and shook his head.

    “I guess it is part of their fate as an animal,” he said. “I know that slaughtering an animal is part of Islamic teachings, so I don’t regret doing my job.”


    Goat Seller Makes A Killing on Holiday

    An elderly woman stopped by a bamboo pen filled with goats. She stood for a while, her eyes roaming over the beasts.

    “A few days before Idul Adha, people will just look around, comparing prices, but they don’t usually buy until two or three days before the big day,” said Abdul Hamid, a goat seller in Benhil.

    Pak Haji, as he is known by his regular customers, has been selling goats for Idul Adha for 15 years. Throughout the rest of the year, the 45-year-old sells chickens in Pasar Benhil, a traditional market in the area.

    About 150 goats are brought from his hometown in Cirebon, West Java, usually five days before the festival. The goats, brought to Jakarta in large trucks, are purchased from a middle man who buys them from individuals in several villages in Cirebon, he said.

    Abdul said that over the last 15 years, he had only once failed to sell all of his goats for the Muslim holiday.

    “I guess I just bought too many at that time,” he said. “I don’t know why I insisted on buying more than 200 [goats] that year.”

    The prices, he said, range from Rp 800,000 for goats weighing 15 kilograms and Rp 2.5 million for those between 50 and 60 kilograms.

    “I don’t actually like to play with prices with my customers,” he said. “But I know they like negotiating, so I usually add Rp 200,000 [$20] [to the original price] at the start of bargaining.”

    Over the years, Pak Haji has gained a following of loyal customers who return year after year for the holiday.

    “An Islamic foundation in Manggarai [South Jakarta] purchases 30 to 35 goats every Idul Adha,” he said.

    “But all customers are the same,” Abdul said. “Selling all of my goats is what matters the most.”
    .

  7. #7
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    the-days-when-capital-turns-a-livestock-pen-stench-et-al

    The days when the capital turns into a livestock pen, stench et al

    The Jakarta Post , Jakarta | Wed, 11/25/2009 2:12 PM | City
    The pungent stench of livestock pervades the air, but Rachmat, a goat trader, sleeps unperturbed at his temporary roadside pen on Jl. Panjaitan, East Jakarta.
    "It stinks, but I have to guard my goats," he says when he finally wakes up.
    Hundreds of seasonal livestock traders have set up shop along city streets and housing areas, just days before the Islamic Day of Sacrifice, which falls this Friday.
    The traders say they build their pens here to draw more buyers.
    For pedestrians and nearby residents, however, the inconvenience is both nasal and nasty: the stench hangs heavy in the air, while the risk of stepping in urine or droppings is up there too.
    Rachmat, a 20-year veteran of the business, admits the sight and smell of the barns might raise concerns about the city's cleanliness.
    He says he had to move his pen from Kalibata, South Jakarta, to his current location because the local administration at the for-mer site was trying to win the Adipura award for running a clean municipality.
    Rachmat balks at claims his pen is dirty, saying he cleans it out daily.
    "I gather the dirt and toss it into the sanitation agency's garbage truck every day," he says.
    Irfan, a cattle buyer, says putting up pens in residential areas, like the ones on Jl. Panjaitan, is a good strategy.
    "I bought two cows here for Rp 25 million *US$2,600* because it's close to my home in Cipinang *in East Jakarta*," he says.
    The temporary pens are dismantled on the sacrifice day, when residents slaughter their animals near mosques and the meat is be distributed among the poor.
    Rachmat says he sells a goat for Rp 800,000 to Rp 3 million, while Kiran, a cow trader in the area, sells a head of cattle for between Rp 8 million and Rp 16 million.
    The animals must be healthy males more than a year old.
    On the day The Jakarta Post visits, about 40 goats are seen huddled in a 9-square-meter pen.
    Benfica, an animal rights activist from the Jakarta Animal Aid Network (JAAN), says the traders should treat their animals better.
    "They shouldn't just be thinking about the profit," he says.
    "They should also keep these animals healthy and comfortable before the sacrifice."
    He adds the animals should be given enough room to move and their pens should be cleaned out at least twice a day.
    "I've seen some of these pens and the traders say they only clean them out in the morning," Benfica says.
    "The animals sleep in their droppings and urine. It's not good for their health."
    He says the city's livestock agency should also run checks on whether the pens meet health requirements.
    Rachmat and Kiran claim the agency has already checked their animals and decreed them healthy.
    "My animals are safe for consumption," Kiran says. (mrs)


    The days when the capital turns into a livestock pen, stench et al | The Jakarta Post

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingwilly View Post
    I've heard about this before, but never really seen it. Some westerners say it's horrible, blood everywhere, but having grown up Catholic, I understand the concept of sacrifice, and also know of the story of Abraham offering his first born to God.



    Wikipedia had this to say...

    Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى‎ Īdu l-Aḍḥā) "Festival of Sacrifice" or "Greater Eid" is a holiday celebrated by Muslims (including the Druze) worldwide to commemorate the willingness of Ibrahim to sacrifice his son Ismael as an act of obedience to God.
    Eid al-Adha is the latter of two Eid festivals celebrated by Muslims, whose basis comes from the Quran.[1] Like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha begins with a short prayer followed by a sermon (khuṭba).
    Eid al-Adha annually falls on the 10th day of the month of Dhul Hijja (ذو الحجة) of the lunar Islamic calendar. The festivities last for three days or more depending on the country. Eid al-Adha occurs the day after the pilgrims conducting Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia by Muslims worldwide, descend from Mount Arafat. It happens to be approximately 70 days after the end of the month of Ramadan.
    Of course this is well out of date now, but I feel it's only fair to point out that Eid al Adha is NOT an Indonesia religious festival, it's an Islamic religious festival.

    Indonesia is not (as yet) an Islamic nation.

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