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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Aspirin aids in preventing Heart Attacks ?

    My Uncle sent me this.

    Mayo Clinic on Aspirin - Dr. Virend Somers is a Cardiologist from the Mayo Clinic who is the lead author of the report
    in the July 29, 2008 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

    Most heart attacks occur in the day, generally between 6 A.M. and noon.
    Having one during the night, When the heart should be most at rest, means that something unusual happened.
    Somers and his colleagues have been working for a decade to show that sleep apnea is to blame.

    1. If you take an aspirin or a baby aspirin once a day, take it at night.

    The Reason: Aspirin has a 24-hour "half-life"; therefore, if most heart attacks happen in the wee hours of the morning, the Aspirin would be strongest in your system.

    2.
    Aspirin lasts a really long time in your medicine chest; for years. (when it gets old, it smells like vinegar).


    Something that we can do to help ourselves - nice to know.
    Bayer is making crystal aspirin to dissolve instantly on the tongue. They work much faster than the tablets.


    Why keep Aspirin by your bedside?

    It's about Heart Attacks - There are other symptoms of a heart attack, besides the pain on the left arm.
    One must also be aware of an intense pain on the chin, as well as nausea and lots of sweating; however, these symptoms may also occur less frequently.

    Note: There may be NO pain in the chest during a heart attack.

    The majority of people (about 60%) who had a heart attack during their sleep did not wake up.
    However, if it occurs, the chest pain may wake you up from your deep sleep.
    If that happens, immediately dissolve two aspirins in your mouth and swallow them with a bit of water.

    Afterwards:



    • Call Emergency Services.


    • Phone a neighbor or a family member who lives very close by.
    • Say "heart attack!" Say that you have taken 2 Aspirins.
    • (you might also wish to indicate the strength of the aspirin ... my suggestion)


    • Take a seat on a chair or sofa near the front door, and wait for their arrival



    • and ........ DO NOT LIE DOWN!

    Our fingerprints never fade from the lives we touch

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    My uncle also sent me this ...

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post

    MAYO CLINIC - DRINKING WATER

    A cardiologist determined that heart attacks can be triggered by dehydration.

    Good Thing To Know. From The Mayo Clinic. How many folks do you know who say they don't want to drink anything
    before going to bed because they'll have to get up during the night?

    Heart Attack and Water - Drinking one glass of water before going to bed avoids stroke or heart attack.
    Interesting.......

    Something else I didn't know ... I asked my Doctor why people need to urinate so much at night time.


    Answer from my Cardiac Doctor: Gravity holds water in the lower part of your body when you are upright (legs swell).
    When you lie down and the lower body (legs and etc.) seeks level with the kidneys, it is then that the kidneys remove the
    water because it is easier.
    I knew you need your minimum water to help flush the toxins out of your body, but (below) this was news to me.



    Correct time to drink water... Very Important. From A Cardiac Specialist!

    Drinking water at a certain time maximizes its effectiveness on the body:

    2 glasses of water after waking up - helps activate internal organs

    1 glass of water 30 minutes before a meal - helps digestion

    1 glass of water before taking a bath - helps lower blood pressure

    1 glass of water before going to bed - avoids stroke or heart attack


    I can also add to this... My Physician told me that water at bed time will also help prevent night time leg cramps.
    Your leg muscles are seeking hydration when they cramp and wake you up with a Charlie Horse.

  3. #3
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    A banana a day stops cramp also.

  4. #4
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    Good subject, good thread. Aspirin therapy has rewards and, of course risks

    MAYO CLINIC on aspirin therapy

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-c...y/ART-20046797

    Daily aspirin therapy: Understand the benefits and risks

    Daily aspirin therapy can be a lifesaving option, but it's not for everyone. Get the facts before considering a daily aspirin.

    By Mayo Clinic Staff
    Daily aspirin therapy may lower your risk of heart attack, but daily aspirin therapy isn't for everyone. Is it right for you?

    If you've had a heart attack or stroke, your doctor will likely recommend you take a daily aspirin unless you have a serious allergy or history of bleeding. If you have a high risk of having a first heart attack, your doctor might recommend aspirin after weighing the risks and benefits.
    You shouldn't start daily aspirin therapy on your own, however. While taking an occasional aspirin or two is safe for most adults to use for headaches, body aches or fever, daily use of aspirin can have serious side effects, including internal bleeding.

    How can aspirin prevent a heart attack?

    Aspirin interferes with your blood's clotting action. When you bleed, your blood's clotting cells, called platelets, build up at the site of your wound. The platelets help form a plug that seals the opening in your blood vessel to stop bleeding.
    But this clotting can also happen within the vessels that supply your heart with blood. If your blood vessels are already narrowed from atherosclerosis — the buildup of fatty deposits in your arteries — a fatty deposit in your vessel lining can burst.
    Then, a blood clot can quickly form and block the artery. This prevents blood flow to the heart and causes a heart attack. Aspirin therapy reduces the clumping action of platelets — possibly preventing a heart attack.

    Should you take a daily aspirin?

    Talk with your doctor about whether daily aspirin therapy might help you prevent a heart attack. Your doctor may suggest daily aspirin therapy if:
    You've already had a heart attack or stroke
    You haven't had a heart attack, but you have had a stent placed in a coronary artery, you have had coronary bypass surgery, or you have chest pain due to coronary artery disease (angina)
    You've never had a heart attack, but you're at high risk of having one
    You have diabetes and at least one other heart disease risk factor — such as smoking or high blood pressure — and you're a man older than 50 or a woman older than 60

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended daily aspirin therapy if you're age 50 to 59 years, you're not at increased bleeding risk, and you have an increased risk of heart attack or stroke of 10 percent or greater over the next 10 years. If you're age 60 to 69, you aren't at increased bleeding risk, and you have a high risk of heart attack or stroke of 10 percent or greater over the next 10 years, talk to your doctor about daily aspirin therapy. More research is needed to determine the benefits and risks of daily aspirin use in adults younger than age 50 and older than age 70 before a recommendation can be made for or against aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease and colorectal cancer for these age groups.
    Although aspirin has been recommended in the past for certain groups of people without a history of heart attack, there's some disagreement among experts about whether the benefits of aspirin outweigh its potential risks. The Food and Drug Administration doesn't recommend aspirin therapy for the prevention of heart attacks in people who haven't already had a heart attack, stroke or another cardiovascular condition.
    Guidelines are varied between organizations, but they're evolving as more research is done. The benefits of daily aspirin therapy don't outweigh the risk of bleeding in people with a low risk of heart attacks. The higher your risk of heart attack, the more likely it is that the benefits of daily aspirin outweigh the risk of bleeding.
    In women, daily aspirin therapy may be more effective at preventing strokes than heart attacks. The bottom line is that before taking a daily aspirin you should have a discussion with your doctor.

    Should you avoid daily aspirin therapy if you have another health condition?

    Before starting daily aspirin therapy under the advice of your doctor, you should let him or her know if you have a health condition that could increase your risk of bleeding or other complications. These conditions include:
    A bleeding or clotting disorder (bleeding easily)
    Aspirin allergy, which can include asthma caused by aspirin
    Bleeding stomach ulcers

    What's the best dose of aspirin to take?
    Your doctor will discuss what dose is right for you. Very low doses of aspirin —75 milligrams (mg), which is less than an adult low-dose aspirin — can be effective. Your doctor will usually prescribe a daily dose anywhere from 81 mg — the amount in an adult low-dose aspirin — to 325 mg (a regular strength tablet). If you have had a heart attack or have had a heart stent placed, it's very important to take aspirin and any other blood-thinning medications exactly as recommended.

    What happens if you stop taking aspirin every day?
    You might be surprised to learn that stopping daily aspirin therapy can have a rebound effect that may increase your risk of heart attack. If you have had a heart attack or a stent placed in one or more of your heart arteries, stopping daily aspirin therapy can lead to a life-threatening heart attack.
    If you have been taking daily aspirin therapy and want to stop, it's important to talk to your doctor before making any changes. Suddenly stopping daily aspirin therapy could have a rebound effect that may trigger a blood clot

  5. #5
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    Cramps - electrolytes

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/29...yte-imbalance/

    Leg Cramps and Electrolyte Imbalance
    by ROBIN GILBERT Last Updated: Aug 14, 2017

    Electrolytes are charged particles found in body fluids that form when salts dissolve in water or fluids. Electrolytes transmit electrical impulses necessary for proper nerve, muscle and heart function. Any imbalance in one or more of the major electrolytes could contribute to leg cramps and other complications.

    Background
    The primary electrolytes found within the body are sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium. Electrolytes are ingested through foods and fluids and are eliminated primarily by the kidneys. It is the kidneys' job to control electrolyte balance, therefore kidney failure is the most common cause of electrolyte imbalance. In addition to kidney failure, a disruption of electrolytes can occur from excessive sweating, vomiting or diarrhea and blood loss or infections.

    Sodium and Potassium
    Sodium is the major electrolyte found outside the cells in the extracellular fluid. Sodium plays a major role in fluid regulation and transmitting nerve impulses. Water follows salt in the body, so a gain or loss in sodium results in a gain or loss of water. If you have low sodium, called hyponatremia, you will have deficient sodium and water in excess of the sodium. This causes swelling of the cells which leads to muscle and leg cramping. Potassium is another major electrolyte that affects the excitability of nerve and muscle cells. Too much potassium causes increased activity of the cells and too little potassium causes decreased activity. Generally, the low levels of potassium result in muscle weakness, which could be associated with muscle cramping.

    Calcium and Magnesium
    Calcium and magnesium are both stored in the bones. Calcium also affects the excitability of nerve and muscle cells. Low levels of calcium, called hypocalcemia, causes increased muscle irritability. This can result in muscle cramping and the feeling of pins and needles in the extremities. Magnesium's functions overlap with those of potassium and calcium. Low magnesium again results in muscle irritability, causing muscle spasms and hyperactive reflexes.

    Significance
    Leg and muscle cramping can occur with a shift of any one of the major electrolytes. Cramping is most often associated with decreased levels of the electrolytes. Leg cramps may be early symptoms of electrolyte disturbances.

    Treatment
    Treatment for leg cramps is focused around replacing the necessary electrolytes. In mild cases of leg cramps, simply increasing foods rich in sodium, potassium, calcium or magnesium may fix the problem. Some sports drinks contain essential electrolytes and may aid in eliminating the symptoms. In more severe cases, electrolyte supplements may be necessary.


    As per Chittychangchang - Bananas are loaded with potassium.

    I personally, sweat gallons in this tropical heat and consequently drink copious quantities of water. I also tend to follow a fairly aggressive exercise routine, retiree so exercise is a good pastime for myself. I replenish my electrolytes with good ol' Gatorade Bt 25 at the local 7's.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    I told a doctor I took half an aspirin a day. When I told him I took it to reduce the risk of heart attack he just laughed. He then basically said 'if it ain't broken don't try to fix it'.

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    He then basically said 'if it ain't broken don't try to fix it'.
    agree: more effective to pay attention to diet, exercise and a reduction of sinful behavior...

  8. #8
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    We had a thread with Aspirin in it recently and the problem is you can't get it here any more. Well nobody in that thread knew where to get it anyway. You can get anything you want over the counter here but not Aspirin

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    ...^so that's why my pharmacist could only offer me ibuprofen...

  10. #10
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    This is one of those on-again, off-again theories that's been around for years. Some say yes, some say no benefit, some say it's bad for you. Me, I never take any pills or other meds unless absolutely necessary and prescribed by my doctor for some specific ailment.

  11. #11
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    The key sentence:


    Bayer is making crystal aspirin to dissolve instantly on the tongue. They work much faster than the tablets
    .

    Research is needed to promote the product.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Headworx View Post
    We had a thread with Aspirin in it recently and the problem is you can't get it here any more. Well nobody in that thread knew where to get it anyway. You can get anything you want over the counter here but not Aspirin
    While I think you're right to an extent, like most things here, that rule is flexible. For example, the large pharmacy next to Bullys Pub on Sukhumvit in Bangkok (50m from the Soi 4 junction) sells Asprex 81 (81mg asprin tablets) over the counter.

  13. #13
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    If you want pills to take in emergency, while asprin is good, you want to get hold of nitroglycerin tablets.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnasty2017 View Post
    you want to get hold of nitroglycerin tablets
    flavored like Pop Rocks, I assume...

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Headworx View Post
    We had a thread with Aspirin in it recently and the problem is you can't get it here any more. Well nobody in that thread knew where to get it anyway. You can get anything you want over the counter here but not Aspirin

    I can get asprin, but only the low dose variety.


    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnasty2017 View Post
    While I think you're right to an extent, like most things here, that rule is flexible. For example, the large pharmacy next to Bullys Pub on Sukhumvit in Bangkok (50m from the Soi 4 junction) sells Asprex 81 (81mg asprin tablets) over the counter.
    +1

    Yep, that place is amazing ... anything you want is available.
    Keep walking down lower Suk with NANA on your left, past the Servo with the Macca's in it and a bit further down on the left is the Chemist.


    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnasty2017 View Post
    If you want pills to take in emergency, while asprin is good, you want to get hold of nitroglycerin tablets.
    +1

    Yes, apparently, that is the bee's knees.

    Shaggy has nailed it.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnasty2017 View Post
    get hold of nitroglycerin tablets.
    Good, but do not jump up and down, once taking them, for 12 hours.

  17. #17
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    Alright. I will chip in. Sigh. Since my major heart attack a little over 2 months ago, I have been on aspirin. Once a day, 81mg as prescribed by the doctor (note the dosage, a "normal" aspirin clocks in around 325mg)) - along with a few other things of course.

    Mainly as I now have three stents keeping my heart arteries open, a blood thinner is needed to slow clotting and preventing the stents getting clogged.

    Aspirin for post heart attack is now pretty much par for the course. Preventive is a bit more problematic. It might reduce your chance of getting a heart attack, but it might make a stroke much worse.

    Its not recommended to "self treat" with a daily dose of aspirin.

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat Dillinger's Avatar
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    Sorry to hear about your ticker Nid.

    Were there any warning signs, how long did that lay you up for and whats the doc told you to do?

    Ive been taking apple cider vinegar, every morning, its not exactly stripping the belly fat off just yet though

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    Sorry to hear about your ticker Nid.

    Were there any warning signs, how long did that lay you up for and whats the doc told you to do?

    Ive been taking apple cider vinegar, every morning, its not exactly stripping the belly fat off just yet though
    No worries.

    Warning signs? Nothing. Bouncing along in my normal routine. Not a care in the world. Walking to work when it started. What nearly killed me was I thought it was GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disorder) which I had had one time before. Hindsight there were differences, but at the time the chest pain seemed identical. I was in the process of "gutting it out" when one of my staff had enough of my pained look and basically shanghaied me and got another staff member to drive me to hospital. Funnily enough the same hospital that had treated me for GERD a few years previous.


    The hooked me up to the heart monitor, and oh! what fun started when the nurse *ran* out of the exam room screaming (I kid you not) MI! MI! MI! (myocardial infarction).

    Docs were not amused when they asked me when it started, and I said "about 4 hours ago". They then started dry ramming handfuls of pills down my mouth.

    They then told me that if I did not get it fixed in the next couple of hours, I was going to die.

    Oh, how we did laugh.

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat Dillinger's Avatar
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    wow.

    Did you get any pins and needles in your left arm?

    I take it you had insurance, that operation looks to be around 2 million baht at Bumrungrad

  21. #21
    Pedantic bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dillinger View Post
    wow.

    Did you get any pins and needles in your left arm?

    I take it you had insurance, that operation looks to be around 2 million baht at Bumrungrad
    The only different symptom I had (from the chest pain) was massive sweating. A *very* slight numbness in my left arm that was really unremarkable until questioned on it.

    Sweating is apparently quite a key symptom. Given that I was walking to work, in Thailand, in the sun - that one skipped right past me.

    Insurance. Ok. Funny story. My first hospital was a private, they were going to charge about 350K just for the angioplasty.

    However, I have the Thai social insurance through my work. I asked if they could transfer me to my designated, and they said that hospital only takes life and death transfers -we will call and ask. Ten minutes later, the ambulance was outside and I was getting shipped. Screaming sirens, mad death pelt down clogged highway. Me, strapped in the back with an automatic heart defibrillator which every 5 minutes beeped out "no shock required" (followed by my thank f*ck for that).

    Got to my hospital -wheeled *directly* into the OT. Ten nurses started stripping off my day clothes (excuse me madam!), surgeon breezes in, and his first words were "15% mortality"! (about 1 in 7, I think he was trying to cheer me up!).

    Anyway, off the table in a few hours (surgeon said while he was in there, he would fix a few other problems (!!)), and into recovery.

    Grand total for me to pay on top, for the whole shebang (emergency angioplasty and stenting, stay in critical cardiac unit, stay in intensive cardiac then a couple of days in normal cardiac ward) was..........




























    ....234 baht. Not "kbaht" just "baht". The main extra charge was for "electricity". Think one of the nurses dobbed me in for charging my hand phone. LOL.

  22. #22
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    Holy fuck. What a story. Im glad your ok. We can shit can the somchai sometimes but in bangkok the hospital care is really second to none imho. Of course your gonna pay for it but in your case you seem to have had a brilliant result. The problem is if your in the province the health care maybe hit and miss. In my case I live in vientiane and I can honestly say that if you have a serious problem and you can't get across the border for one reason or another then your fucked. I wouldn't take my dog to a Vientiane hospital. It's about 20 for years behind. . Slowly getting better but it's not on the government's priority.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnasty2017 View Post
    If you want pills to take in emergency, while asprin is good, you want to get hold of nitroglycerin tablets.
    one over the counter one not. Nitro is so strong, it must be prescribed. 35 years ago my dad had those for "Angina Pains" at that time. Only for an emergency for the average person trust me. So much has been done in the area of heart disease problems since then. Aspirin being a simple inexpensive idea.

    Somehow I did not see you posts. What a story Nid, but those stents are so common now days. So happy you are well. Take those aspirin. One of my best friends same story on the golf course 16 years ago. Still going strong. This time it has significance " good on ya nid"!!!!
    Last edited by aging one; 30-10-2017 at 07:41 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Nitro is so strong, it must be prescribed. 35 years ago my dad had those for "Angina Pains" at that time. Only for an emergency for the average person trust me
    For sure.

    In an emergency situation, if you have a heart attack and are far from a hospital, when combined with asprin, it may buy you enough time to get to the hospital alive.

    Drugs for acute coronary syndrome

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) refers to a spectrum of clinical mani[at]festations associated with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina. In ACS, a plaque in a coronary artery ruptures or becomes eroded, triggering the clotting cascade. A blood clot forms, occluding the artery and interrupting blood and oxygen flow to cardiac muscle.

    Many healthcare providers use the acronym MONA to help them remember the initial medical treatment options for a patient with ACS.

    M: morphine
    O: oxygen
    N: nitroglycerin
    A: aspirin.

    But keep in mind that while MONA might be easy to remember, the drugs aren’t given in the MONA sequence. They’re given in the order of OANM.

    https://www.americannursetoday.com/e...d-surg-nurses/
    Step by step, inch by inch, piece by piece.

  25. #25
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    Thanks for sharing, Nid. Have you had to make many lifestyle amendments since?

    Of course, beetroot and garlic are a scared pairing when it comes to heart health; eat up.

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