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  1. #26
    เกี่ยวข้อง HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by somtamslap View Post
    First thing I'll eat when I get back is a straight somtam, gai yang set.

    Then I'll embark on an outing with the ale. And I may be some time...

    Homesickness spawns....

  2. #27
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    no noodle soup (I wager there is more kwai teow eaten here than most of those dishes).
    Surely you're not claiming that's an Isaan dish?

    It's Cantonese.

    The title of the piece is not 'The most widely eaten dishes in Thailand'.

    Shame there's no link btw.

  3. #28
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    ^ Not claiming it as Isaan- a more 'isaanised' version of yer basic Cantonese noodle soup would be kwai jaap, which thanks to the garlic, has a fair Vietnamese influence- in Ubon, which has a VN community, it is sometimes called Vietnamese noodles. Then there's the kwai teo from Malaysia and Singapore, made only with flat noodles and not a soup at all- dry stir fried noodles. (Incidentally, the word teo or teoh in Cantonese is just a 'qualifier'- it refers to anything long and ribbon like, be it a snake, a piece of string, or noodles.) They all originate from, but differ, from the original Cantonese style- you won't find chilli and nam pla in a Cantonese noodle soup!

    And of course, Massaman is a Malay dish- should that have made the cut then? The Massaman here hardly varies from the Malay original.

    I've taken the OP to refer to foods that are ubiquitous in Thailand, no matter their historic derivation. On which basis, and not surprisingly, the article seems to be written by someone (a farang or bangkokian?) more familiar with Bk & southern Thai cuisine than the more populous but less visited N & NE. Put it this way- if it's from an isaanite, how on earth did larb not make the cut, while gaeng som & massaman did?
    probes Aliens

  4. #29
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    First thing I usually order coming back after a spell outside Thailand is the "krapow gai / moo". With fried egg of course. Yum.
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  5. #30
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    ^Yep, that's usually my first port of call, a lovely krappow moo/gai. If I've been out of the country a while I'll go eat it at an indoor place, as I'll no doubt sweat like a pig

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    You haven't hated gaeng som until you've tried Southern gaeng som.
    Oh, I have hated it for years. My wife hails from the back blocks of Nakhon Sri Thammaraat. Her and her posse are also into that horrible smelling gaeng tai pla (which tastes only slightly better than it smells, which isn't any endorsement at all).

  7. #32
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    Best gaeng som I had was from a place on the Pranburi River, not far from the mouth at Pak Nam Pran. Local alligator. Having got used to some pungent Isaan tastes, no ploblem to me.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    ^ Not claiming it as Isaan- a more 'isaanised' version of yer basic Cantonese noodle soup would be kwai jaap, which thanks to the garlic, has a fair Vietnamese influence- in Ubon, which has a VN community, it is sometimes called Vietnamese noodles. Then there's the kwai teo from Malaysia and Singapore, made only with flat noodles and not a soup at all- dry stir fried noodles. (Incidentally, the word teo or teoh in Cantonese is just a 'qualifier'- it refers to anything long and ribbon like, be it a snake, a piece of string, or noodles.) They all originate from, but differ, from the original Cantonese style- you won't find chilli and nam pla in a Cantonese noodle soup!

    And of course, Massaman is a Malay dish- should that have made the cut then? The Massaman here hardly varies from the Malay original.

    I've taken the OP to refer to foods that are ubiquitous in Thailand, no matter their historic derivation. On which basis, and not surprisingly, the article seems to be written by someone (a farang or bangkokian?) more familiar with Bk & southern Thai cuisine than the more populous but less visited N & NE. Put it this way- if it's from an isaanite, how on earth did larb not make the cut, while gaeng som & massaman did?
    What about Khanom Jin which, despite Jin meaning Chinese, are about as Thai as it gets?



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  9. #34
    Your own Personal Jesus
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    ^How about 'Thai foods we can live without' ?

  10. #35
    Thailand Expat Dillinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    how on earth did larb not make the cut,
    Probably because its so essy to make back home?

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    What about Khanom Jin which, despite Jin meaning Chinese, are about as Thai as it gets?
    of my favorites is dtam soo-ah:

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  12. #37
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    Erm, that's Somtam Thai (Isaan style is quite different, stick to Thai).
    ^ So is that a strange dialect from your part of the country?
    Or am I showing off my limited Thai.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Erm, that's Somtam Thai (Isaan style is quite different, stick to Thai).
    it has the khanom jin (noodles) that dr. bob mentioned, i.e.: dtam soo-ah.

  14. #39
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    sabang, if you get the noodles every time = good.

  15. #40
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    I had a few traditional somtams in Nakhon Phanom, where its claimed they serve the finest Isaan food.

    Those were the few times I've actually eaten most of the somtam on a plate. Brilliant, they were. Aroi maak. The freshly done chicken was just right (it was sunday lunchtime), but sadly one place spoiled it by heating up yesterdays on the bbq, which arrived still cold in the middle, and it was a bit slimy..ie. not well done.

    Usually I pick at a somtam and dip my khao neow into the juices, but I never thought this could taste so great.

    So it goes to show, if you want great Isaan food, go to Isaan. Or Sabai jai Kai yang in Ekkamai, almost opposite Big C

  16. #41
    Da Man stroller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ Pat View Post
    Aroi maak.
    Do you mean "saep eree"?

  17. #42
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    ^No, aroi maak maak...and I love that Isaan dipping sauce, freshly made, not the bottled one.

    Spicier the better

  18. #43
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    if you want great Isaan food, go to Isaan
    That depends. If you want authentic Isaan food, go to Isaan- but you'll need a tolerance for home made plah laa, organ meat (offal), and some pretty fierce chilli.
    I love that Isaan dipping sauce
    Me too- moo yang (bbq pork neck) grilled over charcoal, sticky rice, raw seasonal veg & the proper Isaan dipping sauce = yumm.

  19. #44
    เกี่ยวข้อง HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    That depends. If you want authentic Isaan food, go to Isaan- but you'll need a tolerance for home made plah laa, organ meat (offal), and some pretty fierce chilli.
    Dependent, as well, on locale throughout Isaan -
    As the familial "standard" cuisine will vary from place to place and yet, still considered regional Isaan fare.

    What is taken in Surin differs greatly from NKP.....and Kalasin preferences might contradict greatly in Sisaket.....etc, etc.

    Yet, all considered to be Isaan.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    Thom Yum Gung is my favorte Thai dish. I had a bowl every day when I spent a week in Hua Hin with the family recently. My wife had snapper in spicy lemon sauce every day, which I ate half of.
    Fat bastard.

  21. #46
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    Three dishes that I can do without, but would rather not...

    Gang Hanglay
    Larb moo/gai
    Pad Krapao gai/moo

    Can't quite get the Hanglay to taste anything close to the old tart at the Chang Mai food market makes (Or Aroon Rai on Kotchasarn Rd), but it's close enough.

    There is a small Thai Takeaway down the road from me.The cook/owner is an old Isaan bird that makes a mean Larb. She also does a great Pad krapao when I supply the Krapao leaves ......

  22. #47
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Larb?

    the rib does some simple and interesting things I don't know the name of...

    transforms simple cabbage with some kind of sauce

    meaty rice porrige

    neua tort and other meaty and fishy variations of that

    some intensely stinging astringent dips too
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1F2i0rYMj8

    we are all figments of our own imagination.

  23. #48
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmart View Post
    First thing I usually order coming back after a spell outside Thailand is the "krapow gai / moo". With fried egg of course. Yum.
    Oh yes... yumski...

  24. #49
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    Take base ingredients of mostly dire quality. Smother it with chili, spices and anything burning hot to mask the taste and poor quality of the base ingredients. Add a little food colouring to extend the range.
    Thai food has your palette suckered.
    Changed little over the centuries, the possible exception being fresh fish and seafood.

    It was done to persuade people to eat raw meat products that would have killed you were it not for the spices. Thais have you eating cheap smelly shite, made from inedible ingredients for peasants.

    Im not here for the culture or the temples or the food. The saving grace for Thai food is that other Asian spiced shite only comes in mud colour.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Take base ingredients of mostly dire quality. Smother it with chili, spices and anything burning hot to mask the taste and poor quality of the base ingredients. Add a little food colouring to extend the range.
    Thai food has your palette suckered.
    Changed little over the centuries, the possible exception being fresh fish and seafood.
    Wow you having a bad day? I too am tired of Thai food most of the time. But that is BS.

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