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  1. #1
    Neo
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    Basmati is best.

    I've stopped buying Thai Jasmine rice.
    It's not special, all that 'delicate flavour' hype is just nonsense.
    Rice is rice is rice, and I prefer mine not to fall apart or turn into glue.
    So I'm back on the Basmati, ok

  2. #2
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    Try the local [Thai] Red Rice...

    Might change your perspective as it applies the varied jasmine types.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat klong toey's Avatar
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    This post should be in the daily moan but,we buy basmati rice in the UK when we are in Thailand Mrs Fussy buys the rice fairly good quality think from Ubon.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by klong toey View Post
    This post should be in the daily moan but,we buy basmati rice in the UK when we are in Thailand Mrs Fussy buys the rice fairly good quality think from Ubon.
    Certainly in Thailand, the varieties and grades of jasmine quality differ greatly.
    Depending on what you're accustomed to taking...

    A little bias, perhaps - try Surin Mali jasmine.
    Quite well known amongst Thais as being a superior variety - texture and flavour.

  5. #5
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    We get high grade, fresh stuff off the family farm and mix it with the red stuff. It all tastes like cardboard to me and try not to eat it unless I'm having a proper English curry.

  6. #6
    Neo
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    It all tastes like cardboard to me and try not to eat it unless I'm having a proper English curry.
    Exactly, rice tastes like rice. Rob's English curry recipe coming soon.

  7. #7
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    ^ Made with Indian rice

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    What he said above, this thread belongs in the daily moan.

  9. #9
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    If I had my way I would buy Basmati to ,, in Colchester we have some big Asian outlets now doing some real deals on the 10/15/20kg bags

    Also they do the 10kg bags of broken rice WTF that is ? but its around 60p per kg so that would do me.

    Mai aroi honey you have to get Jasmine ok ?
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

  10. #10
    Neo
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan View Post
    ^ Made with Indian rice
    Stricly Basmati in this house Nige

    It's got English ingredients, an Indian method and Thai spices...
    I've done it a few times now and got the balance just right, all will be revealed.
    Last edited by Neo; 02-04-2013 at 03:36 AM.

  11. #11
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    For me, American long grain is rubbish, basmati is ok, Thai jasmine is the best.

  12. #12
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    I reckon if you argue about the quality of different rices, you must be eating that rice with some pretty bland food.
    About the only rice I am fussy about is sushi rice- and in Thailand it's crap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    We get high grade, fresh stuff off the family farm and mix it with the red stuff. It all tastes like cardboard to me and try not to eat it unless I'm having a proper English curry.
    Proper English curry.
    No such beast.


  14. #14
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    Different tastes at home,My wife likes Hommari Kow Jasmine,I prefer Basmati,a must with an Indian curry

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    There is one rice I like on it's own and it is Thai, but few Thai have ever tried it. Thailand has it's own 'royal cuisine', quite different to traditional Thai cuisine (and opposite end of the spectrum from fiery, peasant Laos/Isaan cuisine). The rice, top shelf of course, comes steeped in cold jasmine water. About the only place I know that you can try this cuisine is the Thai restaurant at The Oriental (across the river actually, complementary shuttle boat), and the only thing memorable about it was the rice.
    probes Aliens

  16. #16
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    I prefer Basmati expensive in Thailand, but enen the local variety shouldn't go gluggy unless its old rice or poor quality or too broken. I find in that respect, Basmati is more tolerant.

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    There is one rice I like on it's own and it is Thai, but few Thai have ever tried it. Thailand has it's own 'royal cuisine', quite different to traditional Thai cuisine (and opposite end of the spectrum from fiery, peasant Laos/Isaan cuisine). The rice, top shelf of course, comes steeped in cold jasmine water. About the only place I know that you can try this cuisine is the Thai restaurant at The Oriental (across the river actually, complementary shuttle boat), and the only thing memorable about it was the rice.
    That is a seasonal dish and is lovely. Probably the only thing I look forward to in the summer months here. Can't remember the name of it..... Jeez.

    S & P Restaurants everywhere serves it during the summer only. You can even buy it out of their cooler display to take home.

    A woman makes it in Pingpayom Market here Chiang Mai that's better than S & P, though won't do you any good, Sabang.

    Yummy and refreshing.

  18. #18
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    I use Basmati bought from Macro in 5 kg bags.
    Wife wont eat it because it's Indian (that's my thinking?)
    Trouble is...I don't eat rice a lot and it appears, all too often, to reach it's sell by date.
    Anyway, here's my chicken tikka with Basmati.


  19. #19
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    Really don't care too much regarding rice. If totally down to me I would choose Basmati but we get all our rice from the family so I eat what is on the plate

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rural Surin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    We get high grade, fresh stuff off the family farm and mix it with the red stuff. It all tastes like cardboard to me and try not to eat it unless I'm having a proper English curry.
    Proper English curry.
    No such beast.

    Too easy...

  21. #21
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    As for the hot season special I do believe its Khao Chae, here is a little bit of background on the dish.

    Khao Chae itself is quite simple. Just rice, jasmine water and ice. The complex side dishes are what make this annual meal so highly sought after.

    As summer approaches, Thailand is starting to get unbearably toasty. One of the few redeeming qualities of the hot season is that restaurants all over the country will soon start serving the delicious but complicated summer dish, khao chae.
    Khao chae -- which means "rice soaked in water" -- made its first appearance in the court of King Rama II as a means of relief during the hot season. In fact, Thai celebrity Chef McDang, who grew up in a Bangkok palace, argues that it's the only Thai dish that can truly be considered "royal Thai cuisine."
    Khao chae was adapted from a simple Mon recipe into the complex, multi-dish variety found today. And though you don't need to be a member of high society to enjoy it, due to the elaborate process required to make the side dishes it's only widely available from mid-March until the end of April.

    To help the uninitiated get a taste of this popular treat here's a quick guide to khao chae.


    Side dishes include deep-fried kapi balls and pork-stuffed green peppers drizzled with egg.
    What is it?

    There are three parts to khao chae: rice, jasmine-scented water (hence the floating flowers) and crushed ice. The rice is parboiled (boiled with its husk in tact) to keep its shape so it doesn't get mushy when immersed in water, making it chewier than regular cooked rice.
    The side dishes are the real star in this meal. Recipes vary but the essentials remain the same. Most of the sides tend to be sweet, except for one: young green peppers stuffed with minced pork, which are then drizzled in egg and fried.
    Another must-have khao chae component is deep-fried kapi (shrimp paste) balls, which are rolled in ground coconut, battered and then deep-fried to perfection. This also goes well with kra-chai, or fresh Chinese ginger, which is usually served along with other fresh vegetables such as cucumber, spring onions and strips of raw mango.
    Shredded sweetened pork or beef and Chinese radish (chai pow) are also important. In most khao chae sets, the radish is caramelized to shine. In older recipes, however, it usually would only be lightly stir-fried with palm sugar and eggs.

    Other less common sides include boiled salted egg, pla naem (powdered dried fish meat), deep-fried red onions and sun-dried chilis stuffed w

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by charleyboy
    sell by date
    Kept dry, rice keeps for years.

  23. #23
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    Marmers...As I'm not an afficianado of rice cooking, maybe the last lot I made was overcooked.
    Thanks for the tip. I'm gonna keep the rest (about 3 kilo's) and try again.
    Charley.
    PS. The rice in the pic was perfect.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    Kept dry, rice keeps for years.
    Sure, but how to keep the weevils out?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bazzy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog
    Kept dry, rice keeps for years.
    Sure, but how to keep the weevils out?
    Like any dry good, keep it sealed [or not].

    A couple critters here or there isn't any harm....since I presume you would be washing it before cooking preperation.

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