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Thread: Killer chillies

  1. #1
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    Killer chillies

    This is an email from my old man today word for word with the photo.

    Now my Mum has travelled to Thailand 3 times and can hold her own when eating chillies - not saying she loves them but she can handle them ok.

    So what happened here?


    Mum was cooking tea and she picked a chilli from the plant in our conservatory and sliced it up and put it in a stirfry. The fumes started to give her asma,then she touched her lips and made them numb! ,then she must have touched he eye then she started to panic and scream with the pain. She couldnt see to get to the shower, so I had to lead her.
    While she was washing her eyes I tried to get a doctors opinion,but it was after hours so I got hold of an emergency no and spoke to a nurse, she said to put her in the shower.
    After about 5 minutes Rosemary asked me to call the ambulance,I put it off for a couple of minutes and she started to come good,she now has a bad headake but is OK.
    It is now 2 hours later and we have had all the windows open and I am getting a tight chest, so it must be a good brew! I am not sure if I should eat it for tea.

    The moral of the story? Those Thai girls that cook with chillis must be darn tough!

    [/IMG]
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  2. #2
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    Habanero, hottest there is about 5 - 8 time the heat of Thai chilies. These are not to be toyed with my amateurs
    3 or 4 in a salsa will get you goin' if that's what you like (like a helluva lot). One in a stir fry dish for two people is way too hot for people that are not chili addicts. I love 'em.
    They will cause burning sensation on your hands rubbing your eyes is excruciating a cool compress held over the affected area will relieve most of the pain but you may need to keep it on there a long while. is get more than just a touch you find it difficult to wash it all away and may rub your eyes a day or two later only to find a whoel new pain awaits. Good to hear your Mom came through OK. Tell her to be careful with them things never touch the inside parts
    When the people fear their government, there is tyranny; when the government fears the people, there is liberty -- T. Jefferson


  3. #3
    ding ding ding
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    ^ I think i ate one of those once. I was talking out the side of my mouth like Sylvester Stallone for about 2 days after. Damn it was hot, I couldnt sleep either.

  4. #4
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    Also touching your genitals after picking chilis is not really a good idea, yes I am speaking from experience

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie View Post
    Habanero, hottest there is about 5 - 8 time the heat of Thai chilies. These are not to be toyed with my amateurs
    3 or 4 in a salsa will get you goin' if that's what you like (like a helluva lot). One in a stir fry dish for two people is way too hot for people that are not chili addicts. I love 'em.
    They will cause burning sensation on your hands rubbing your eyes is excruciating a cool compress held over the affected area will relieve most of the pain but you may need to keep it on there a long while. is get more than just a touch you find it difficult to wash it all away and may rub your eyes a day or two later only to find a whoel new pain awaits. Good to hear your Mom came through OK. Tell her to be careful with them things never touch the inside parts
    Me too, thought habanero was up there with jalapeno, as long as limited editions don't count.

    The Hottest Chilli in the World
    Last edited by keda; 06-03-2007 at 07:28 PM. Reason: typo

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by keda
    thought habanero was up there with jalapeno,
    Jalapeno = about 5000 Scoville units
    Thai prik ki nuu = 60,000 scoville units
    Habanero = 350,000 - 400,000 Scoville units

    Jalapenos are little more than nice pickled condmanet for munching with a few Dos Equis
    Habs are nice though real good flavor to go with the heat.

  7. #7
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    Yes must be tasty not just hot.

    Impressive, but no contest against 16 million (see link).

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    Quote Originally Posted by keda
    Impressive, but no contest against 16 million
    I looked. (after I posted)
    No flavor just heat, too much in fact. peppers are cheap and they just taste good. Cute little conversation piece but of little real use, I tried Dave's Insanity once it uses extracts but at least had some flavor; nice drizzled over cream cheese on a onion & garlic bagel

  9. #9
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    ^ now thats juz plain weird. sure u aint pregnant?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by friscofrankie View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by keda
    Impressive, but no contest against 16 million
    I looked. (after I posted)
    No flavor just heat, too much in fact. peppers are cheap and they just taste good. Cute little conversation piece but of little real use, I tried Dave's Insanity once it uses extracts but at least had some flavor; nice drizzled over cream cheese on a onion & garlic bagel
    Used to have DI at Waitrose around 10 yrs ago then all went quiet. Good stuff, apparently could be used for scouring footpaths or something like that; got some in my eye but only once.

  11. #11
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    6,000 Years of Red Hot Chili Peppers

    Thursday, Feb. 22, 2007 By PETER RITTER
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    adSetTarget('_blank'); htmlAdWH('93224389', '88', '31'); adSetType('');


    Last week archaeologists reported in the journal Science that they had found traces of domesticated chili peppers on 6,000-year-old cooking utensils used in South and Central America, suggesting that New World cuisine was more sophisticated than once imagined. "It looks like people have liked spicy food for a very long time," says lead researcher Linda Perry of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. Which of course raises the question: Just how spicy did they like it? In Scoville Heat Units—a measure of capsaicinoids, the chemicals that give food "heat"—the picante peppers of prehistoric Peru pale in comparison with today's hottest chilies.
    1,001,304 SHUs
    New Mexico State University's Chile Pepper Institute last week certified the Bhut Jolokia, or "ghost chili," from India as the hottest ever tested. By comparison, most pepper sprays come in at 2 to 5 million SHUs.
    923,000 SHUs
    In 2005, Michael and Joy Michaud of Dorset, England, shattered the Scoville record with the Dorset Naga, cultivated from a Bangladeshi pepper; it was potent enough for handlers to require gloves.
    577,000 SHUs
    At more than 60 times the spiciness of a jalapeno the Red Savina habanero, developed in California, is twice as hot as other habaneros and was until recently considered the world's hottest chili. 50,000 SHUs
    Perry calls the rocoto pepper, at left, a "modern variety" of the Capsicum pubescens identified by her team. The ancient chilies likely spiced up maize and root stew but were probably no hotter than cayenne peppers.

    Who would have thought that the second hottest Chile of all time was grown in Dorset, UK?

  12. #12
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    Latest update:

    Mum woke up still a bit groggy but otherwise ok. Cut up fruit for breakfast only to discover that she couldn't eat it as it was too spicey! She had used the same chopping block (which had been cleaned) to cut the fruit up

  13. #13
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    MeMock,

    I am sure that TD will pay you to touch one of these to your japseye. Hillbilly got bit by a dog and took photos you can touch one of these to your japseye and take photos.

    It's for the forum after all.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock
    she picked a chilli from the plant in our conservatory and sliced it up and put it in a stirfry.
    I guess we can all assume she never got the chance to put 'em in the stir fry and eat 'em.
    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock
    she couldn't eat it as it was too spicey! She had used the same chopping block
    If she did they would have taken the top of head off. Gotta be careful when cooking with unknown peppers there are some bad-boys out there. I use The Thai prik Kii Nuu chilis they've got a wonderful fruity flavor and a decent punch. Great in Thai salads or a salsa, 20 - 30 of em chopped up in a pot of soup or chili adds a nice bite.

    Handling these chilis and using the same implements to chop ingredients for other dishes, never a problem. When I work with Habs I use a separate plastic chopper, am careful to not handle the chopped chilis with my hands. The residue just doesn;t wash off that easily and takes a few days to fade away.

  15. #15
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    I rang her this morning and read out your info frankie, she was especially impressed to hear that they are the hottest chillis around and she didn't feel so bad for asking Dad to call an ambulance!

    What could happen if a child picked one and stuck in in their gob? As this chilli bush is inside the house and floor level.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrsquirrel View Post
    MeMock,

    I am sure that TD will pay you to touch one of these to your japseye. Hillbilly got bit by a dog and took photos you can touch one of these to your japseye and take photos.

    It's for the forum after all.
    Great idea and you know that I would do it for free for teak door...alas the chilli bush is in New Zealand. Dad has assured me though that he will put some in the freezer for my wife when we move over there.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock
    What could happen if a child picked one and stuck in in their gob? As this chilli bush is inside the house and floor level.
    At the very least the parents would be highly distressed for a few hours. The chemical really does not "burn" but it does trigger an extreme response in the brain via nerve endings and can cause the body to react as if it were burnt, up to and including blistering (This I have read no personal experience).

    The variety pictured, is a "red savina" Habareno. If you are not a huge fan of chilies (I mean someone that thinks Thai food is mild) you really don't even need them around. The bright red color has got to attract kids attention. We all know, toddlers put everything (that fits) in their mouths.

    Depending on the proximity to daily living, might be best to move the plant. She will put in her mouth, she may get some "juice on her hands, she will cry, she may rub her eyes.

    The residue lingers on the hands, no matter how much you scrub, for days. Reference DD's post above, depending on the amount you got on your hands and how long they were exposed your hands can be an implement of pain for days. (yes, from personal experience).

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeMock
    What could happen if a child picked one and stuck in in their gob? As this chilli bush is inside the house and floor level.
    Dunno; but it'd make a great thread, especially with video.

  19. #19
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    Some friends in Vermont grew some habaneros one summer many years ago.
    They were yellow inoffensive looking. How hot could they be?
    My friends warned me "those are hot"!
    Me I was macho and eaten lots of hot spicy food in Thailand...I took a bite out of one to show how tough I was......My mouth burned quite a bit for a couple hours....tough guy!

  20. #20
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    Email from my Dad this morning.


    Do you remember the ayatolla (murray smith) told me that he made a hot sause with habanero chilli. He had experience with it in bangladesh.
    He used rubber gloves and a face mask.When a freinds kid continued having his sandwiches stolen from his school lunch, Murray put some of the sauce in a sandwich,the kid that stole it eaded up in emergency at the hospital. Result, the stealing stopped.
    Mum got the plant especialy for ***my wifes name***!
    Mum is still a bit crook but comming good.

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