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Thread: Thai Herbs

  1. #1
    sabaii sabaii
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    Thai Herbs


    Chili: "Phrik" in Thai
    Chili is an erect, branched, shrub-like herb with fruits used as garnishing and flavouring in Thai dishes. There are many different species. All contain capsaicin, a biologically active ingredient beneficial to the respiratory system, blood pressure and heart. Other therapeutic uses include being a , carminative and anti flatulence agent, and digestant.



    Cumin: "Yi-ra" in Thai
    Cumin is a small shrubbery herb, the fruit of which contains a 2-4% volatile oil with a pungent odour, and which is used as a
    flavouring and condiment. Cumin's therapeutic properties manifest as a stomachic, bitter tonic, carminative, stimulant and astringent.



    Garlic: "Kra-thiam" in Thai
    Garlic is an annual herbaceous plant with underground bulbs comprising several cloves. Dried mature bulbs are used as a flavouring and condiment in Thai cuisine. The bulbs contain a 0.1-0.36% garlic oil and organic sulfur compounds. Therapeutic uses are as an antimicrobial, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, anti flatulence and cholesterol lowering agents.



    Ginger: "Khing" in Thai
    Ginger is an erect plant with thickened, fleshy and aromatic rhizomes. Used in different forms as a food, flavouring and spice. Ginger's rhizomes contain a 1-2% volatile oil. Ginger's therapeutic uses are as a carminative, antinauseant and antiflatulence agent



    Galanga: "Kha" in Thai
    Greater Galanga is an erect annual plant with aromatic, ginger-like rhizomes, and commonly used in Thai cooking as a flavouring. The approximately 0.04 volatile oil content has therapeutic uses as carminative, stomachic, antirheumatic and antimicrobial agents.



    Hoary Basil: "Maeng-lak" in Thai
    Hoary Basil is an annual herbaceous plant with slightly hairy and pale green leaves, eaten either raw or used as a flavouring, and containing approximately 0.7% volatile oil. Therapeutic benefits include the alleviation of cough symptoms, and as diaphoretic and carminative agents.



    Kafffir: "Ma-krut" in Thai
    The leaves, peel and juice of the Kaffir Lime are used as a flavouring in Thai cuisine. The leaves and peel contain a volatile oil. The major therapeutic benefit of the juice is as an appetizer.



    (No Common English Name): Krachai in Thai
    This erect annual plant with aromatic rhizomes and yellow-brown roots, is used as a flavouring. The rhizomes contain approximately 0.8% volatile oil. The plant has stomach ache relieving and antimicrobial properties, and therapeutic benefits as an antitussive and antiflatulence agent.



    Lemon Grass: "Ta-khrai" in Thai
    This erect annual plant resembles a coarse gray-green grass. Fresh leaves and grass are used as flavouring. Lemon grass contains a 0.2-0.4 volatile oil. Therapeutic properties are as a diuretic, emmanagogue, antiflatulence, anti flu and antimicrobial agent.



    Lime: "Ma-nao" in Thai
    Lime is used principally as a garnish for fish and meat dishes. The fruit contains Hesperidin and Naringin , scientifically proven antiinflammatory flavonoids. Lime juice is used as an appetizer, and has antitussive, anti flu, stomachic and antiscorbutic properties.



    Marsh Mint: "Sa-ra-nae" in Thai
    The fresh leaves of this herbaceous plant are used as a flavouring and eaten raw in Thai cuisine. Volatile oil contents give the plant several therapeutic uses, including
    carminative, mild antiseptic, local
    anesthetic, diaphoretic and digestant
    properties.



    Pepper: "Phrik-Thai" in Thai
    Pepper is a branching, perennial climbing plant from whose fruiting spikes both white and black pepper are obtained. Used as a spice and condiment, pepper contains a 2-4% volatile oil. Therapeutic uses are as carminative, antipyretic, diaphoretic and diuretic agents.



    Sacred Basil: "Ka-phrao" in Thai
    Sacred Basil is an annual herbaceous plant that resembles Sweet Basil but has narrower and often times reddish-purple leaves. The fresh leaves, which are used as a flavouring, contain approximately 0.5% volatile oil, which exhibits
    antimicrobial activity, specifically as a
    carminative, diaphoretic, expectorant and
    stomachic.



    Shallot: "Hom,Hom-lek,Hom-daeng"in Thai
    Shallots, or small red onions, are annual
    herbaceous plants. Underground bulbs
    comprise garlic-like cloves. Shallot bulbs
    contain a volatile oil, and are used as
    flavouring or seasoning agents. Therapeutic properties include the alleviation of stomach discomfort, and as an antihelmintic, antidiarrhoeal, expectorant, antitussive, diuretic and anti flu agents.



    Sweet Basil: "Ho-ra-pha" in Thai
    Sweet Basil is an annual herbaceous plant, the fresh leaves of which are either eaten raw or used as a flavouring in Thai cooking. Volatile oil content varies according to different varieties. Therapeutic properties are as carminative, diaphoretic, expectorant, digestant and stomachic agents.



    Turmeric: "Kha-min" in Thai
    Turmeric is a member of the ginger family, and provides yellow colouring for Thai food. The rhizomes contain a 3-4% volatile oil with unique aromatic characteristics. Turmeric's therapeutic properties manifest as a carminative, antiflatulence and stomachic.

  2. #2
    splendid and tremendous
    somtamslap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabaii sabaii
    Greater Galanga is an erect anal plant
    Don't expect to hear from withnall for a few hours. He's just popped down the market.

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    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Just in time for Boo's new planting!

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    He steals all my ideas... Such a useless OP, Northerner you see...

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    Thailand Expat
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    Chilli is also an anti-oxidant, apparently useful in warding off cancer.

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    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton
    Just in time for Boo's new planting!
    Quote Originally Posted by palexxxx
    He steals all my ideas... Such a useless OP, Northerner you see...
    Beaten to it by both ya bastards!!

  7. #7
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    Interesting thread.This has made me hungry. Is there a thread for recipies on here?

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    Quote Originally Posted by palexxxx View Post
    Chilli is also an anti-oxidant, apparently useful in warding off cancer.
    And no doubt colds too. I had a heavy stint of backpacking in asia for 27 months and been back a few times since 2007. Now back in England, last severe cold i had was before 2004.
    Last edited by WujouMao; 10-01-2012 at 02:39 AM.

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    Thailand Expat
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    Were those picture of the plants the two Burmese gentlemen sold you today half price?

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    Yum. Hey, Thailand quit exporting garlic (or the Chinese told them to cease & desist). We only get China-made (or California) now; neither compare in quality & taste to the Thai. Real bummer.

  11. #11
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    http://northernthailand.com/cm/recipes/thai-recipes/herb.htm

    I found the web site you got your info from. I have never seen cumin used in Thai cooking. Is anyone aware of dishes that it is used in here?

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^I think it is in most curry paste.

  13. #13
    ความสุขในอีสาน
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    Interesting thread mate but " herbs " ? IMO at least 50% of the above I wouldn't have thought were herbs , but then I do have an open mind

  14. #14
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    The common English name for krachai is fingerrot.

    Hoary basil? Never heard of that.

    I have heard of, and seems much more common in Thai cooking than hoary basil, holy basil, bai kaprow. Everybody's favourite

    Yi- ra, cumin, is obviously a Thai adaptation of the Indian, jeera. You sure it's common in Thai curries, Miss Kitty? I don't usually see it mentioned in recipes.

    Two big ones missing are pak chi, coriander and pak chi barang, sawtooth coriander.

    Here's a very good site, nearly academic:

    http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/index.html

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    Member Oswulf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pol the Pot View Post
    The common
    Two big ones missing are pak chi, coriander and pak chi barang, sawtooth coriander.
    Probably should be "farang" - not "barang". And pak chi farang can refer both to sawtooth coriander and to parsley.

  16. #16
    Member Oswulf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Humbert View Post
    I have never seen cumin used in Thai cooking. Is anyone aware of dishes that it is used in here?
    It's not widely used, apart from dishes influenced by the moslem world and by India (via Burma). Matsaman and Hang Leh curries both often use it.

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