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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    Regards your drainage issues, clearly you are prepping to ensure there are no areas where water collects but its worth considering that where the waters migrates to will be more damp than other areas in the wet season - roots generally don't like it too wet so i'd think about what you are planting in those ares - obviously some plants thrive in soil that has a higher water content.
    Again good points. When we built our house I insisted on that the house sit a bit higher and all water that comes from rain drains away from the foundation. Same with the drive way and the trees. They should not have deep water surrounding them during the rainy season. Durian and Jack fruit will die quickly. Mango trees are very forgiving as are Banana. Lawns or grass LOVE the rain.

    Landscaping, like anywhere, takes a bit of homework to understand the vegetation one is going to plant.

  2. #27
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Again good points. When we built our house I insisted on that the house sit a bit higher and all water that comes from rain drains away from the foundation. Same with the drive way and the trees. They should not have deep water surrounding them during the rainy season. Durian and Jack fruit will die quickly. Mango trees are very forgiving as are Banana. Lawns or grass LOVE the rain.

    Landscaping, like anywhere, takes a bit of homework to understand the vegetation one is going to plant.
    Your reference regarding the heartiness and forgiving character of mangoes is spot on, JP.
    High water, long dry spells, fire, disease, etc - get through it all.

    Can wonder why they're the favoured tree by mot deang.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Your reference regarding the heartiness and forgiving character of mangoes is spot on, JP.
    I'm in the learning process! they seem to thrive more when they are cut back once the "fruiting" has finished, in the process of cutting one old tree down now (wish I had a decent saw!), was never taken care off and just too far gone to recover now, red ants certainly like them - & me!
    The grass we have likes the rain but doesn't like to be submerged for long periods, we have times when rains for days, not heavy rain, but I guess the roots get starved of oxygen?

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Your reference regarding the heartiness and forgiving character of mangoes is spot on, JP.
    High water, long dry spells, fire, disease, etc - get through it all.

    Can wonder why they're the favoured tree by mot deang.
    Yes Mot Deang love them and the big leaves are perfect for wrapping up to make their colony. I hate the bastards. They are relentless and have no fear. Thankfully they have no venom just a good bite to let you know they are there. One time I hit a nest that I did not see and had about 200 or 300 on my arm and shirt. Its actually feels like a burning searing feeling when they are all biting you.

    They also love Lumyai trees as well. I once had a basketball size colony in my Lumyai tree. Wife went and asked the neighbor if they wanted the eggs. They ran right over with a pole cutter and a 5 gallon bucket. Cut that nest off in 30 seconds and covered it and left.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    I'm in the learning process! they seem to thrive more when they are cut back once the "fruiting" has finished
    We do that every year. The trees are always far more healthy when they grow back. We also fertilize ours. Problem for me, just like banana's, we just cannot eat that many. I get "Mango'd" out. We usually give them away to neighbors to the point they do not want them and likely give them to someone else..HAHA. I told my wife we should thin the fruit out early and just produce some really big good ones. My Lab loves when the small ones fall she, eats them. I personally like the trees, they offer good shade, greenery and privacy.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    The trees are always far more healthy when they grow back.
    I read that you should cut back about 25% a year, so after four years you have all "new" branches, seems to be working, consequence being, like you, we had so many mangoes last year we couldn't give them away never mind eat them!
    My office window looks onto two mature mango trees that are different varieties, nice to watch them through the year as they go through the different stages of bearing fruit, they have just started flowering in the last week.

  7. #32
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    Hi folks, I'm enjoying the information and discussion in your posts. A few good pointers noted as well that I can apply soon.

    I've completed the detailed measuring of the property and am currently drawing up the diagrams of it. In the meantime the general duties gent who we now pay has moved all 600 of the garden edge blocks to the back yard and should start building the first 10 x 3 meter vegetable patch today. There will be two of these established in the coming week or two. He has also sourced some good looking top soil although it is packaged by the large bag and seems expensive. I am toying with the idea of using it for the first vegetable patch and look at the progress of the vegetable seedlings to decide if it is okay. I'm thinking a couple of weeks and I could make an initial judgement. Meanwhile the first of the wife's fruit tree seedlings were moved from Nan to Pua today. We will bring more each trip and just maybe get down to only having to do one specific trip with the remaining plants and paraphernalia the wife has gathered.





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  8. #33
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    BiP, out of interest how much did you pay for the blocks? I ask because i did some raised bed but used the Concrete planks, coz i'm cheap.....

  9. #34
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    16 baht per block NPT, included delivery of 80 kilometers from where they are stored. We purchased them through a nursery in Nan near the Elephant intersection, they say they make them. In store price was 15 baht and while I tried to get a discount for purchasing 600, the delivery charge pushed it to 16. I was drawn to these because it will be very easy to outline a garden bed and semi-secure it with stakes through the holes. If I don't like the location, shape, size or any other reason I can very easily pull the stakes out and redo it. Regards, -BiP
    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    BiP, out of interest how much did you pay for the blocks? I ask because i did some raised bed but used the Concrete planks, coz i'm cheap.....

  10. #35
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    I've finally gathered sufficient information and had enough time to draw up the layout of our land and home at Pua. The land is orientated due north/south and while I've shown the house and carport to be the same, they are actually orientated about 5 degrees east of north. But for simplicity sake I'm going to leave them shown as north/south.

    In the next day or so I'll split this into a front yard and a back yard view so they can be bigger and show in more detail what I need to do and what I want to do.

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  11. #36
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    These are the three existing trees. Wife is keen to keep them at this time and give them a chance to show they are worth it. Personally I'd prefer to only keep the Lychee tree, other two look a bit past it.

    Rambutan tree.



    Senna Siamea, more common names are Siamese Cassia, Kassod, Cassod or Cassia. The general duties guy says he eats the flowers and pods, likes it.


    Lychee tree.
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  12. #37
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    The general duties gent we've hired short-term needed a bit of a nudge today to get the first vegetable garden edging done. I did one end and then the wife bought him over to show what was required. Not sure if he was uncertain or just reluctant but it was well underway when we left today. This and the next vegetable garden edging will be a bit rough. Once we're happy with everything we'll redo it and make a better job of providing a more level base for the bottom block. I'll put a temporary wall across one third of this garden to make an initial 3 x 3 meter garden that we'll fill with soil and enable the wife to plant her vegetable seedlings when we move to the home in 3-4 days.

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  13. #38
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    This is an overview of the work I'm intending over the next several months. The identifying numbers are just that, they don't signify sequence or importance.

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  14. #39
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    Hi BIP, what is the thinking of not having a fence on the northern boundary?

  15. #40
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    ^^

    #8 ... do you have any concerns for the kitchen garden.

    Will it get enough sun sandwiched between a 2 metre metal fence and 2 story house.

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    Hi NPT, an update from the post I told you I paid 16 baht per block. Well the electrician who wired our house also sells them (don't ask, I don't know) and I could have got them for 13 baht. Obviously I'm thrilled with this news. Regards, -BiP
    Quote Originally Posted by NamPikToot View Post
    BiP, out of interest how much did you pay for the blocks? I ask because i did some raised bed but used the Concrete planks, coz i'm cheap.....

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    Will be a fence there Neverna, just didn't draw it, my bad. Regards, -BiP
    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    Hi BIP, what is the thinking of not having a fence on the northern boundary?

  18. #43
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    Hi David, probably better described as a herb garden and plenty will grow there. While it is at least twelve years ago and in Australia, I've grown parsley, chives, mint and coriander in semi-shade, others I'm sure as well but memory is failing me. They will all figure here as will Lemon Balm that I'm interesting in using. Things that require full sun or majority sunlight will not be for here, likely the east end of the vegetable garden currently being built. BTW, the closer to the house vegetable garden will have some restrictions in what I can plant there and when because it will only get direct sunlight majority of the day for five months a year. - BiP
    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    ^^

    #8 ... do you have any concerns for the kitchen garden.

    Will it get enough sun sandwiched between a 2 metre metal fence and 2 story house.

  19. #44
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    The wife moved the bulk of her lettuce seedlings today and we decided to plant them out. But we also decided the full sun of the newly laid out vegetable patch would probably not be a great idea. So we build a 3 x 2 meter garden closer to the house, filled it with some heavily composted soil we purchased in the local village, planted and mulched the seedlings. There is a few more to go up to Pua tomorrow and more planting. But I do have a dread fear that some animal is going to find and devour these before I get any type of barrier in place. Nevertheless, made the wife happy.

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  20. #45
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    we had a lot of problems with water holding where there was no drainage,but the wife got ? is it called malaysia grass turf,great no more puddle's of water the grass sups it all.

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    Thanks HH, will investigate that. Regards, -BiP
    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    we had a lot of problems with water holding where there was no drainage,but the wife got ? is it called malaysia grass turf,great no more puddle's of water the grass sups it all.

  22. #47
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    So we moved into our new home today and while the higher priority focus is getting the inside of the house organized, there will be an acceleration of the outside work. Day three and the wife's lettuce garden hasn't been devoured by anything. With a bit of luck we should see a growth spurt from them in the next week.

    Late this afternoon the two trellises I had made were delivered. These will be concreted in on the west boundary next to the house and are for Australian and Thai passionfruit vines. They were made by the same gent who build the carport and side gates so I was pleased he had toned down the engineering a bit. Still heavy though. Cost was 3,500 baht each including priming and delivery to site.





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  23. #48
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    Update 9 February 2019

    Well it has been a week since we moved into the new home and while there is a focus on sorting the inside of the house out, we've been progressing the outside as well via personal efforts by my wife and I and the general duties guy who we've hired for the time being.

    The main activity outside has been to establish the vegetable gardens in the back yard. We laid out a 13m x 3m garden but decided to split the second garden into three smaller patches, two at 3m x 2m and another at 7m x 2m. We got some soil in said to have come out of a rice paddy and have been combining that with locally produced compost. The lettuce garden is doing very well indeed. Nothing has touched the lettuce and we'll harvest some leaves tomorrow for a salad. (We brought seedlings from Nan so no, we haven't gone from seed to plate in seven days.)

    A first pass of clearing vegetation from the east boundary has been completed.

    The spirit house concrete platform is in place. Holding off buying and installing the new spirit house because the wife doesn't know the process or protocol of getting the spirits to shift house and for the old house to be removed.

    Today the general duties gent and I dug the holes and concreted in the two trellises. However there has been a slight change of plan. One trellis will be shared by the Australian and Thai passionfruit vines. The other trellis has been positioned on the west boundary on the south side of the concrete fence at the front of the house. The wife wants to grow Flamevine or Orange Trumpetvine (pyrostegia venusta) so I've given her that trellis. One end of the trellis will now be an anchor point for the barbed wire and concrete post fence that will go around the front half of the property.

    I'm now turning my attention to the porous retaining wall needed in the north west corner. Having wielded a shovel and heavy digging bar for the best part of the morning I've now decided to cancel the idea of manually digging post holes for the wall in favour of bringing in a light tracked backhoe and trenching along the boundary.

    We've decided to add a garden shed to the job list and have reduced the size of the kitchen garden to accommodate it.

    In the diagram below the green text indicates a job completed, the orange text is a started but incomplete job. Black text means I'm still staring at it, possibly with the intent of finding a way that lessens my personal exertions including opening the wallet.

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  24. #49
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    East boundary after initial pass clearing vegetation. Still a way to go here. Need more prep before bring in someone with a chainsaw to cut the teak stumps lower and take out some other rubbish trees.





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  25. #50
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    The vegetable gardens and lettuce patch.



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