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  1. #26
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    You could be right. The gardener reckons white is quite unusual and pink is more common.
    He could well be right.


  2. #27
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    That would entail me actually getting off my arse and going out into the garden!!
    Same. Not that I would have posted pictures in any case. I reckon even the dimmer posters already know what a coconut looks like.

  3. #28
    Pedantic bastard
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    River crocs....
    Get a lot of them in Portland, do they Jeff?

  4. #29
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    Quote Begbie
    It’s pouring rain and there’s about two inches of standing water in our “field”. I’ll have a go later weather permitting.

    You are forgiven then! For now that is looking forward to the future to see some pictures, particularly Breadfruit as I have not seen that before. I suppose I could Google it but that would spoil the surprise.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post
    Same. Not that I would have posted pictures in any case. I reckon even the dimmer posters already know what a coconut looks like.
    Yes Davis that is probably true but do they know what one looks like with the husk on? Do they know what a coconut tree looks like?
    Remember there are people who think chocolate milk comes from chocolate cows.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by ootai View Post
    Lots of taro i.e phuak
    Another thing I don't understand why it's not a thing in Thailand is taro leaves as a leafy green dish. When done properly, it's delicious. Palusami when served at a buffet is raided first before the roast pork; THAT is an endorsement when you consider Pacific Islanders' love of roast pork.
    I often see the stalks sold in the market here and my wife has promised to ask the vendor to bring the leaves....hasn't got around to it yet. I grew some taro in pots (I don't have a garden) from root tops of tubers bought in Big C and had one delicious feed of the leaves.

    Nice thread Ootai.

  6. #31
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    Maanaam
    I have never heard it mentioned about eating the leaves so I will ask and see what response I get.
    Just out of interest and so I can tell the Missus how do you cook the leaves? Do you use any leaf or do you need young fresh ones?

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ootai View Post
    Maanaam
    I have never heard it mentioned about eating the leaves so I will ask and see what response I get.
    Just out of interest and so I can tell the Missus how do you cook the leaves? Do you use any leaf or do you need young fresh ones?
    Glad you asked. Younger leaves are best and not cooked for a day. Taro leaves contain oxacycic acid crystals which create an itchy feeling in your mouth (which is most likely why Asians don't eat them) but if the leaves are picked and then left overnight, it seems the crystals disolve or change in some way. Better yet, after picking the leaves, pinch the tip off so some of the sap seeps out and then leave them for a day.

    Classic palusami...best I give you a vid, and keep in mind it can be done in an oven in the house. You don't need the lovo/umu hot stone rigamarole. Also, you can just chop and boil with coconut cream..add tinned fish if you like (nicer).
    The main thing to remember is to let the leaves rest so that the oxacylic acid crystals dissolve.

    This is the Fijian-living-overseas method. (Note: I prefer the Fijian-in-Fiji method, and and count the Samoan method as ultimate.)

    How to make Palusami Fiji Style ? Coconet
    This is the Polynesian method (Samoan). Add fish (fresh or tinned) or whatever meat if you like. Also, add a few drops of Thai fish sauce and chillies (Maanam cooking tip #12)

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ootai View Post
    first thing outside the back gate is Dragon fruit. The ones she grows here are the nicest I have eaten.
    Keo Mongon I am breakfasting for years with Muesli and yoghurt. It is said it helps to reduce diabetes, BP, etc. In my case it might be true.

  9. #34
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Two minutes ago, after the rain...

    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #35
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    .....

  11. #36
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    Great Photo Squirrel, what is it.?

  12. #37
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Your last attempt at a Caesar Salad.

  13. #38
    Utopian Expat
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    It's like spot the ball with a difference, ok give us a clue?
    What are we looking for?
    Apart from the fact it's upside down, keep practising as Mrs Fagass said to the class dunce

  14. #39
    Thailand Expat

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    Must of had a night on some sort of substance,poor bugger must be bouncing around today.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chittychangchang View Post
    Apart from the fact it's upside down
    Spat my Heineken all over my computer.

  16. #41
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Back story to my question; I posted some info about breadfruit being a super-food of sorts and asked the question about why it was not more abundant in Thailand. Further, I noted that the few times I've seen it sold in the market, it was sold immature and cut up (as if to add to a curry). In the Pacific Islands, breadfruit is ubiquitous and usually only picked when ripe. Used as a staple. It's benefits include a very good yeald per footprint of land used and once established, it's a source of food for decades. Many Pacific people plant a breadfruit tree upon the birth of a child, giving that child food for a lifetime.
    Begbie was inspired to go and buy a sapling which he planted.

    I believe Begbie has been attempting experimentation with breadfruit here for a time with some success - there are a couple of referenced threads dedicated towards breadfruit where he has contributed.
    Breadfruit never really took off as a societal food throughout SE Asia, yet has the keen ability to thrive here quite well. Know a couple of folks that have established trees, yet don't know what to do with it - not really marketable here - mostly of a novelty fashion.

    The odd nursery will carry it - but generally, difficult to locate.
    Been wanting to plant a breadfruit sapling for a while, but never got around to it - personally, I cherish breadfruit - especially slow roasted, as it's nutty and non-offensive flavour is attractive.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    as it's nutty and non-offensive flavour is attractive.
    Never heard of it before.

    Sounds more like a vegetable then a fruit and would like to try it.

    What is it called in Thai?

  18. #43
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    It's like a dumbed-down version of 'The Gumbies' here sometimes.

    Glenn Gumby just 'spat heineken all over' his computer.

    There must be a 'y' in the day.

  19. #44
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    He could well be right.

    Don't think ours is a protea though. The petals are completely different.

    Probably in the same family though.

    Wife says it's called 'Dalaa' and usually only grows in S. Thailand.

    Perhaps S. Thailand TDers can help.

  20. #45
    hangin' around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Breadfruit never really took off as a societal food throughout SE Asia.
    Jeff, is there a single topic under the sun about 'whom' [sic.] you can comment without seeming like an utter wanker.

    Been wanting to plant a breadfruit sapling for a while, but never got around to it
    Well you're clearly a busy guy, and, well, Portland...

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Never heard of it before.

    Sounds more like a vegetable then a fruit and would like to try it.

    What is it called in Thai?
    It is starchy and I think classed as a fruit. In Thai it is "sa gae", can't find it in my dictionary for Thai script. Looks a lot like jackfruit.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    there are a couple of referenced threads dedicated towards breadfruit where he has contributed.
    Links please. Not to the thread I started on the subject.
    Although that link would be helpful too

  23. #48
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    ^^ OK, Thanks for the info!

    i will check with the missus.
    Last edited by Loy Toy; 26-07-2018 at 06:51 PM.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    Perhaps S. Thailand TDers can help.
    Sorry, Mrs is in a grump tonight. I can't ask her without giving ground

  25. #50
    Not a Mod.
    Begbie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Links please. Not to the thread I started on the subject.
    Although that link would be helpful too
    He’s got you Jeff. I only commented on Manaam’s thread.

    The breadfruit tree is in good health but no signs of any actual fruit.

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