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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by birding View Post
    A hand sized Moth not a butterfly and I wouldnt have a clue to a name, taken on 15/7/14 on the doorway of a shop in Singburi.

    Tropical swallowtail moth (Lyssa zampa) : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyssa_zampa

  2. #102
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    Thanks Troy.

    4 from Tat Mok NP earlier this month.



    Common Map.




    Small Yellow sailor.



    Staff Sargent.



    One of the Helans I think.

  3. #103
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    Impressive pictures ! Good job

  4. #104
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    I haven't been to the village during April for a few years. It is normally too hot and dry and ticket prices are high due to Songkran. However, I made the trip this year, with some reasonably priced tickets, and we had a bucket load of rain. It still reached my melting point and beyond, with a few days over 40C.

    The hedgerows were awash with Lemon Emigrants. So many that it was difficult to spot any other species at times. I spent a lot of time looking at caterpillars and pupae with the hope of seeing some butterflies hatch. I did get to find some more swallowtails amongst the yellow, again within 100 metres of my house in area code 47120.





    Common Jay (Graphium doson): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphium_doson





    Five-bar Swordtail (Graphium antiphates): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphium_antiphates





    Spot Swordtail (Graphium nomius): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphium_nomius

    They made the standing in the hot sun with bugs flying around my eyes and ears worth it...

  5. #105
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    Having found a tree full of Lemon Emigrant pupae, I waited for the adults to emerge. I missed the first couple of batches because they hatched early morning during thunderstorms. I did eventually get there on time to see a number hatch but only managed to catch one on camera. I have cropped the pictures to put the pupa roughly in the same place...

    Apologies for the out of focus on some of the pictures but I think it is due more to hand held 400mm lens movement



















    It took between 1 and 2 minutes for the adult to hatch from the pupa and then it took another 20 minutes or so for the wings to straighten completely and another hour of rest before the adult was ready to fly.

  6. #106
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    Good to see you back posting photos Troy.

    One from way back, Pea Blue, Tap Lan NP 14/10/15


  7. #107
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    ^ Difficult finding new species in the area around my house during the same seasons. I will have to go back to the village during the wet season or venture out a little more. The venturing out is likely at the end of this year or next year, when the out buildings are complete.

    I did spot a large moth, of interest, on the front patio this time round. It is from the Antheraea genus, which produce the tussar silk, although I am not sure exactly which one.




    Here is a link to the wiki page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antheraea

    This is the link to the Chinese tussar silk moth Antheraea pernyi: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antheraea_pernyi

    ================================================== =============

    Edit: I think the species is Antheraea frithi after further searches, but could only find a wiki page in French:
    https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antheraea_frithi
    Last edited by Troy; 30-04-2017 at 01:35 PM.

  8. #108
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    stunning photos - great thread, thanks!

  9. #109
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    Ever wondered what's eating your shrubs?

    We have a pinwheel flower shrub in the garden that was getting eaten away this year. The MIL takes the flowers to the temple ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabern...ana_divaricata

    Anyway, a quick look at the shrub revealed all:



    They are not so easy to spot, considering their size, and there were lots of them...



    I think this was the third or fourth batch that we removed in the space of a week.

    They are larvae from the oleander hawkmoth: Daphnis nerii. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daphnis_nerii
    Last edited by Troy; 01-05-2017 at 06:28 PM.

  10. #110
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    I spotted some shiny gold in one of my shrubs. Golden gold, really shimmering. This photo of the chrysalis that it turned out to be does not do the gold justice.

    I recently saw a very shiny, iridescent emerald green butterfly around the same shrub. I hope this is metamorphoses into that green beauty.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  11. #111
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    ^ lovely photo and looks quite spectacular.

    The iridescent emerald green may have been a tailed jay (see page 1).
    I think the chrysalis above is one of the crows, possibly a common indian crow.
    However, I don't have a field guide for caterpillars or pupae, so it is only a guess.

  12. #112
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    Have to say Troy you take some impressive pics. (You're still a deluded europhile though!!!!)

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy
    The iridescent emerald green may have been a tailed jay (see page 1).
    Had a look, no, not nearly. This one was bigger than a monarch (the only flutterby I know to compare, lol), and was mostly green hues, and mostly very iridescent.
    As I recall, it didn't have lacy wings.

  14. #114
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    Havent been able to find the name of this rather beat up specimen from Tat Mok NP May 2017


  15. #115
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    ^ It does look a little beaten up doesn't it.

    Without any of the hindwing marginal left and only a small part of the forewing marginal, I am only going to hazard a guess at a couple of possibles. A picture of the underside would be nice to confirm it is from the Nymphalidae family, which is my guess.

    A first possible is that it is one of the foresters (possibly Lethe insana insana). Not many pictures showing the upper side but I would have expected to see at least part of the spots on the hind wing.

    Second possible is The Pan (Xanthotaenia busiris busiris) with the yellow band showing up as white in the photo. It could be but the body doesn't quite look right and nor does the double band.

    It could also be one of the bushbrowns but doesn't quite fit the bill for these either.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam
    I recently saw a very shiny, iridescent emerald green butterfly around the same shrub. I hope this is metamorphoses into that green beauty.
    It could have been one of the Peacocks, for example the following Paris Peacock and Chinese Peacock. I see them around our village but they have so far managed to evade my lens.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papilio_paris

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papilio_bianor

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by birding View Post
    Havent been able to find the name of this rather beat up specimen from Tat Mok NP May 2017
    I asked a friend from the British Conservation Society in the UK. He thinks it is a very battered Autumn Leaf (Doleschallia bisaltide pratipa): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doleschallia_bisaltide

    Always difficult when parts of the wing are missing but I would say it fits the bill better than any other species.

  18. #118
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    Plenty of Peacocks in Kaeng Krachan NP here is a Paris with several other species 8/5/17


  19. #119
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    Not.... an orchard swallowtail I think .... but what is it?






  20. #120
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    First time I have seen one of these, White Dragontail Lamproptera curius

    Nakorn Nayok 30/5/17


  21. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by Looper View Post
    Not.... an orchard swallowtail I think .... but what is it?

    I think it is an adult male Orchard butterfly (Papilio aegeus). See the photos on these websites.

    https://australianmuseum.net.au/orchard-butterfly

    Orchard Swallowtail (Papilio aegeus) female & male

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papilio_aegeus

  22. #122
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    ^looks bang on the money there Nev.

    Good detective work sherlock



    Troy was calling it an Orchard Swallowtail so I guess he got the Orchard bit right.

  23. #123
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    ^ It seems to be called both names. The Latin is the same for both.

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Looper
    Troy was calling it an Orchard Swallowtail so I guess he got the Orchard bit right.
    Papilio is the genus commonly known as Swallowtail in the family Papilionidae so I guess Troy was right along...
    Last edited by Troy; 01-06-2017 at 09:48 PM.

  25. #125
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    2 from Khao Yai NP last week.



    Magpie Crow.



    Blue Pansy

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