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  1. #76
    Member Curious George's Avatar
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    I now feel guilty for only enjoying other's efforts, and not contributing. So, I had better make a contribution also.

    Just to stay within the same Genus, here are a few Thai Dendrobiums:


    Dendrobium parishii (Dendrobium papuatu x Dendrobium mohlianum). Blooms lasted 2 weeks.



    Dendrobium burana green Bloomed 2 months ago, and blooms still on the plant.



    Dendrobium gatton 'sunray' (Dendrobium luteum x Dendrobium illustre). Blooms lasted barely 5 days.
    Geo

  2. #77
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    Great photos and great to see you posting again CG. With my old eyes I can't see the kind of detail you got in your photos without a combination of reading glasses and a magnifying glass....

    Care to go back over this thread and correct any of the ID's we made (or didn't make)?

  3. #78
    Member Curious George's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buad hai View Post
    Care to go back over this thread and correct any of the ID's we made (or didn't make)?
    Thanks for the confidence shown, but I'm only human. I am not shy to say something, if I differ in opinion. I need to agree with Jet Gorgon though, that it would be nice to give an ID if known. Any guess at least breeds discussion, and we all may learn from it.

  4. #79
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    Thanks for enlarging the photos, Dude! Great snaps.
    CGeorge, I love that sunray orchid. What a unique shape. Do you have any fragrant orchids? I remember editing a report some years back about a company (Thai I think) that was trying to create a scented orchid. They also crossed several types of cattleya, too. I must say I was never good at mothering orchids, except in one outdoor bathroom I had. Gave them all a drink when I had a shower five times a day.
    I do love canna. I had one plant with the dreamiest butter orange flower.

  5. #80
    Member Curious George's Avatar
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    ^ The Dendrobium parishii is supposed to be very fragrant, but I can only notice a slight odor. Then again, my old nose may not be very sensitive any more. A few of our orchids have a slight odor, but none that I would say outstanding.

    When I visit our local orchid grower, specializing in Florida Native Orchids, I find some of his are very fragrant with odors of chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, etc. Some of his orchids I would categorize as being extremely fragrant. I don't have any like that.

  6. #81
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    Jasmine

  7. #82
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    ^ That one smells lovely, mate.

  8. #83
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    I just love this thread.

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by buad hai View Post

    Jasmine
    Isn't this actually a Gardenia? Also, from the Jasmine family.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Burr
    Isn't this actually a Gardenia? Also, from the Jasmine family.
    Beats me. That flower is about 1.5 cm across.

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by buad hai View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Burr
    Isn't this actually a Gardenia? Also, from the Jasmine family.
    Beats me. That flower is about 1.5 cm across.
    Ahhhh....thought it was bigger than that. Must be Jasmine.
    The Gardenias I have are about 5 to 6 cms across and have an incredible scent.
    Sorry, offshore at the moment, so, I can't post a pic.

  12. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Burr
    Ahhhh....thought it was bigger than that. Must be Jasmine.
    We also have what I call a "Pacific Gardenia" and the flower, while much bigger, does look very much like the "jasmine" I posted.

    I wasn't aware that Jasmine and Gardenia were related. (They are both from the Class "Magnoliopsida".) The flowers sure look alike and have similar fragrance.

  13. #88
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    The Jasmine is classified as a vine or climber whereas the Gardenia is a shrub. According to what I've looked up at present the jasmine does not have a double flower, its a single flower with about 8 petals to it. Will post examples later on today.

  14. #89
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    The Gardenia has the family name of Rubiaceae

    The Jasmine has the family name Oleaceae

    The Gardenia Jasminoides or the common or cape Jasmine is pictured below



    This one is the Gardenia Augusta


    There seem to be a number of varieties of the Jasmine including officenale, nudiflorum, angulore and grandiflorum. Pictures of a couple of these are below






    However on my research I did come across this example of a Jasmine Sambac which proves me wrong as I had not found a double flower jasmine before. Heres the picture of it




    Looks like the one BH posted though without more info on leaf or habit would be difficult to positively identify.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Propagator
    Looks like the one BH posted though without more info on leaf or habit would be difficult to positively identify.
    Thanks for the clarification. Indeed, I think mine is the Jasmine Sambac. I was searching around yesterday and found it. It's a great plant, but the blossoms don't last long. I recently repotted in better soil and the flowers are bigger and more abundant. The fragrance is heavenly, especially early in the morning. Worth waking for....

  16. #91
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    However on my research I did come across this example of a Jasmine Sambac which proves me wrong as I had not found a double flower jasmine before. Heres the picture of it

    In the States this variety is refered as the "Star Jasmine" which is a great climber.

  17. #92
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    Talking about fragrant, I must agree that I favor the Jasmine most of all. Now for some Horticultural mysteries.

    Here in Florida, we have the Night Jasmine, Solanaceae Cestrum nocturnum. It is very fragrant in the late evening, and also all parts are toxic if eaten. Nightshade is also Solanaceae.

    Now we look at the Night-flowering Jasmine, Oleaceae Nyctanthes arbortristis. The flower is the official flower of the state of West Bengal, India, as well as the Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand. Since the blooms fail at daybreak, it is also called the "sad tree". It is very common to use the leaves of this plant to relieve stomach and bowel ailments in short order.

    Besides sharing common names, these two plants are so similar, but yet so very different. I'll enjoy the fragrance of either.


    Cestrum nocturnum

  18. #93
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    ^George, is this a vine and needs some support?

  19. #94
    Member Curious George's Avatar
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    With vine-like stems, it forms a sprawling shrub not requiring support.



    This specimen is rather large, since they are often cut back to form a tall hedge, or used as foundation plantings. I have also seen one trimmed to resemble a 15+ foot tree.

  20. #95
    Member Curious George's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Propagator View Post
    The Gardenia has the family name of Rubiaceae

    The Jasmine has the family name Oleaceae ...

    However on my research I did come across this example of a Jasmine Sambac which proves me wrong as I had not found a double flower jasmine before. Heres the picture of it



    ....
    This is Saturday for me, meaning my day off of work. Upon going into my backyard, I saw a new bloom. Thai Wife has several potted plants of which I have no clue as to the identity.

    Returning to indoors, I told Thai Wife that I loved her Gardenia bloom. She looked at me quizzically, and after sorting out the misunderstanding, she said, "I only grow Jasmine - I wouldn't bother with a Gardenia!"

    So here is the photo. It is daytime, but the background appears dark considering the flash shot seemed to give better detail of the 5 cm bloom. After trying to prove I was correct, I have given in to that this specimen is some variety of Jasmine Sambac.

  21. #96
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    Have a look on here CG, gives some good examples of Jasmine sambac, and the differance in varieties

    TopTropicals.com - rare plants for home and garden

    Having had a good look at both the Gardenia and the Jasmine Sambac, I think it would be very hard to classify an unlabelled plant of either specie

  22. #97
    Member Curious George's Avatar
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    ^ Thanks for the link.

    It seems that there are several look-alikes in the plant world. While searching the Gardenia species, I noticed the common name on some was Jasmine. That leaves us amateurs out in the cold!

  23. #98
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    ^I dont think Gardenias have as many petals as the double Jasmine.

    The petals are also thicker and not as fluffy looking.

  24. #99
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    Purple Dendrobium



    I think this is called "Pattaya Red", but I'm not certain.

  25. #100
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    Jumpee


    We planted this grafted Jumpee a few months ago. It now has abundant flowers. The fragrance is lovely.

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