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  1. #2401
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    RIP. Just watched him a few days ago in "The Great Escape". Loved him in "Maverick" when I was a kid.

  2. #2402
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    RIP to one of my favourite actors.

  3. #2403
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    I also liked James' role in the 1966 film Grand Prix. R.I.P. James.

  4. #2404
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    Two actors in quick succession.... third one must be due.

  5. #2405
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    Very sad to see him go.

  6. #2406
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    That is a real heart felt loss, always liked him in most every role he played, that's rare, I don't feel that way about most actors/actresses.. It is also news to me, I haven't seen a thing on the computer yet today, I'm surprised it hasn't been a really well covered story this early into his passing.

    I'm also really curious what happened to the young starlet posted about previously too, I hope it wasn't drugs, but still it is quite a startling piece of news being so young and I can't recall hearing anything about her involvement or fight with any substance abuse. To see them grow up on screen in the most public way and then for them to just suddenly pass is almost on a personal level.

  7. #2407
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    Alan Alan

    Escapologist known as 'the British Houdini’ whose flaming rope act left audiences aghast

    Alan Alan giving a pre-escape interview in 1957







    5:41PM BST 19 Jul 2014
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    ALAN ALAN, who has died aged 87, was an escapologist famous for his “burning rope routine” and known as “the British Houdini”.


    Alan devised his trademark burning-rope act in the early Fifties, when he was just starting out in the escapology game. It involved him being trussed up in a straitjacket, or cords, or chains, and dangled on a petrol-soaked rope upside-down from a crane — most famously high above the Thames. The rope would then be lit.


    Audiences watched aghast as Alan wriggled and wormed his way out of his shackles before the rope gave way to the flames. A section of his rope was wrapped in thick wadding, the extra fibre adding valuable time for him to get free.


    “Alan issues a challenge,” declared a Pathé reporter watching the act in London in 1950. “He undertakes to free himself in less time than it takes to tie him. Just to make it more interesting he does it 60ft in the air. Easy as falling off a log, he says, but give us the log to fall off any time.”


    The act was a particularly perilous reinvention of a routine pioneered by Houdini, and nearly got Alan killed on several occasions. In 1950, for example, he came crashing down on to the stage of the Pavilion Theatre in Liverpool when the rope snapped. But as his fame spread across the world, he only heightened the dangers. Before long his hands were clasped in Darby cuffs and he was left hanging over cages of lions or rows of pointed swords.

    Alan Rabinowitz was born on November 30 1926. In boyhood he was awestruck by the famous Danish showman, Dante the Magician, and in his teenage years he developed a magic and escape stage act. Alan was then taken on tour by the promoter Reggie Dennis (who gave him the stage name Alan Alan) and played alongside comedy and novelty acts including Morecambe and Wise and a young Des O’Connor.

    Alan began his career as a serious escapologist much as he carried it through: by trying to upstage Houdini. In 1949, he staged “Houdini II Buried Alive”. Performed for Pathé News, Alan replicated a 1915 stunt in which Houdini had been buried alive in a grave, leaving precious little time to dig himself out. Houdini had lost consciousness as his hands broke the surface. Alan did not even get that far; his assistants had compacted the earth too tightly and he had to be dug out only moments from death. The rolling cameras and resulting column inches, however, helped to make his name.

    Throughout his career Alan refined, adapted and repeated his flaming rope act, playing arenas, theatres and circuses. He also staged open-air crowd-pleasers for the passing public: in 1978 he swung and squirmed 100ft above the Thames as amazed drivers passed over Tower Bridge.

    In 1959, Alan entertained prisoners at London’s Wormwood Scrubs prison — demonstrating how to get out of a set of handcuffs, slip a knot and wriggle free from chains. “It all depends on applying the knowledge at the right time,” he said. “When I do my work I have the right kind of incentive — cash. I can stay cool. A prisoner would be too emotional when it came to the point.”

    In the late Fifties he managed Tommy Cooper’s magic shop in London, where the comedian’s wife Gwen was the driving force. “Gwen, big woman, prone to picture hats,” recalled Alan. “How she managed to keep Tommy under control – after a few drinks he must have been a hell of a handful.”

    In later life, Alan became the proprietor, with Joe Elman, of his own shop — the Magic Spot in Southampton Row. A treasure trove of tricks and props, its walls were stacked with row upon row of wooden drawers, each one carrying its own curious contents: stink bombs, jet-flying cigarettes, palming coins, linking rings, flashing bow ties, glowing fangs, rocket balloons and sneezing powder. It was a dusty palace of peculiarities in which Alan, dapperly decked out in a three-piece suit, enjoyed entertaining his customers.

    One visitor, in 1984, was Michael Palin. “I stopped at Alan Alan’s Magic Shop in Southampton Row, where I was served by a small, neat, besuited gentleman with an arrow through his head,” wrote Palin . “Quickly and efficiently he demonstrated an extraordinary variety of bangs, squirts, farts and electric shocks as if he were selling nothing more exciting than a coal scuttle. Little children watched in awe as their fathers idly toyed with a pack of sexy playing cards only to receive a sharp electric shock from the pack.”

    Alan also mentored a number of aspiring magicians, including a young Michael Vincent, who would later become a Magic Circle Magician of the Year. “There really hasn’t been an escapologist who had a flair for the dramatics like Houdini other than Alan. In some cases I think Alan had the edge,” stated Vincent.

    In addition to his great escapes, Alan also invented a number of clever close-up tricks, including the “Decimated Coin” — in which a coin appears to shatter into pieces — and the “Sharpshooter” card effect, in which a gunshot appears to hit a chosen card from a pack. In the late 1970s he returned to the rope, guest-starring on The David Copperfield Show. Copperfield described him as “someone I’ve idolised since I was a boy”.

    By this stage Alan was a small, wiry man with a frenetic “cheeky chappy” stage persona that reminded many of the actor Norman Wisdom. While the burly American security guards on Copperfield’s stage towered over him, winding chains around his frame, Alan joked, hopped and spun around them.

    In 1983 he played Houdini in the television film Parade of Stars, a re-creation of the vaudeville circuit of the early 20th century.

    Magic’s modern visage — with its slick television personalities and camera tricks — sometimes baffled him. When David Blaine staged his own Tower Bridge stunt in 2003 — hanging 30ft in the air in a Plexiglas box for 44 days without food or water, Alan was sceptical. “I give him 10 days,” said Alan. “The box will mysteriously fall into the river and it will appear that Blaine has been swept away with the tide. He will turn up triumphantly half an hour later in Hyde Park.” In a rather more prosaic climax, a weakened and thin Blaine simply emerged from his stretch and was driven off to hospital.

    The Magic Spot closed in 1996. In 2006 Alan was awarded the Maskelyn Award by the Magic Circle for services to British magic.

    Alan Alan never married. He is survived by a brother.

  8. #2408
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    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaBorn View Post
    That is a real heart felt loss, always liked him in most every role he played, that's rare, I don't feel that way about most actors/actresses.. It is also news to me, I haven't seen a thing on the computer yet today, I'm surprised it hasn't been a really well covered story this early into his passing.

    Here's a link to the news.

    James Garner dead: Actor in Maverick and The Rockford Files dies age 86 - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

  9. #2409
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    Thank you Pale, I found some, but was really surprised it wasn't in the main top page offerings but rather down the page a bit..

  10. #2410
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    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaBorn View Post
    Thank you Pale, I found some, but was really surprised it wasn't in the main top page offerings but rather down the page a bit..
    86 eh, theres still hope for me yet, RIP Jimmy you was one of the best

  11. #2411
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post
    RIP. Just watched him a few days ago in "The Great Escape". Loved him in "Maverick" when I was a kid.
    Great movie! Some great actors in that flick, Steve Mcqueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn even Sir Richard.. He outlasted them all but just barely outlasted Sir Richard..

  12. #2412
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    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaBorn View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post
    RIP. Just watched him a few days ago in "The Great Escape". Loved him in "Maverick" when I was a kid.
    Great movie! Some great actors in that flick, Steve Mcqueen, Charles Bronson, James Coburn even Sir Richard.. He outlasted them all but just barely outlasted Sir Richard..
    I think Richard Attenborough is still with us. Unless the news hasn't caught up with that yet.

    Richard Attenborough - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  13. #2413
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    Ok, I sit corrected, stubborn old codger he is,
    I had heard something but never followed up with it and here it is apperantly, the b'stids.

    Richard Attenborough dead 2014 : Actor killed by celebrity death hoax - Mediamass



    “Richard Attenborough dead 2014” : Actor killed by internet death hoax

    Only of course when I heard it I was driving and heard on the radio now I realize I probably missed the rest of the report which no doubt mentioned it was hoax .

    News of actor Richard Attenborough’s death spread quickly earlier this week causing concern among fans across the world. However the July 2014 report has now been confirmed as a complete hoax and just the latest in a string of fake celebrity death reports. Thankfully, the actor best known for his roles in Jurassic Park or The Great Escape and best known for the movie Gandhi is alive and well.

  14. #2414
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    Panna Rittikrai dies aged 53
    21 July, 2014 | By Liz Shackleton

    Panna Rittikrai, the action choreographer who introduced Thai action movies to world audiences, has died aged 53.

    According to local press reports, Panna died from liver disease on Sunday in a Bangkok hospital. He had been battling illness since November 2013.

    Born in 1961 in Khon Kaen province, Panna started working in the Bangkok film industry in 1979 training actors to fight. After moving back to his hometown, he put together his own stunt team and started making action movies. He trained Tony Jaa and had a major hit in 2003 with Ong Bak, produced by Sahamongkolfilm.

    Directed by Prachya Pinkaew, Ong Bak introduced a new style of realistic, wire-free action choreography and put the Thai martial art of Muay Thai on the world map. It was swiftly followed by Tom Yum Goong (aka The Protector), reuniting the same team.

    Panna soon turned director, as well as action choreographer, and directed a string of films for Sahamongkol including The Bodyguard, Ong Bak 2 and Ong Bak 3, all starring Tony Jaa, along with BKO: Bangkok Knockout featuring a bevy of Thai martial artists and mixed martial arts.

    He also trained female martial artist JeeJa Yanin, and handled action choreography on her first film, Chocolate, also directed by Prachya Pinkaew.

    Panna’s last film before his illness was Vengeance Of An Assassin, starring Choopong Changprung and Nattawut Boonrabsap, which has yet to be released.

  15. #2415
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    I totally understand why he just went by the name James Garner. Read on..

    The son of an Oklahoma carpet layer, James Garner (born James Scott Bumgarner) dropped out of high school at 16 to join the Merchant Marines. He worked in a variety of jobs and received 2 Purple Hearts when he was wounded twice during the Korean War. He had his first chance to act when a friend got him a non-speaking role in the Broadway stage play "The Caine Mutiny Court Martial (1954)". Part of his work was to read lines to the lead actors and he began to learn the craft of acting. This play led to small television roles, television commercials and eventually a contract with Warner Brothers. Director David Butler saw something in Garner and gave him all the attention he needed when he appeared in The Girl He Left Behind (1956). After co-starring in a handful of films during 1956-57, Warner Brothers gave Garner a co-starring role in the the western series Maverick (1957). Originally planned to alternate between Bart Maverick (Jack Kelly) and Bret Maverick (Garner), the show quickly turned into the Bret Maverick Show. As Maverick, Garner was cool, good-natured, likable and always ready to use his wits to get him in or out of trouble. The series was highly successful, and Garner continued in it into 1960 when he left the series in a dispute over money.

    In the early 1960s Garner returned to films, often playing the same type of character he had played on "Maverick". His successful films included The Thrill of It All (1963), Move Over, Darling (1963), The Great Escape (1963) and The Americanization of Emily (1964). After that, his career wandered and when he appeared in the automobile racing movie Grand Prix (1966), he got the bug to race professionally. Soon, this ambition turned to supporting a racing team, not unlike what Paul Newman would do in later years.

    Garner found great success in the western comedy Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969). He tried to repeat his success with a sequel, Support Your Local Gunfighter (1971), but it wasn't up to the standards of the first one. After 11 years off the small screen, Garner returned to television in a role not unlike that in Support Your Local Sheriff! (1969). The show was Nichols (1971) and he played the sheriff who would try to solve all problems with his wits and without gun play. When the show was canceled, Garner took the news by having Nichols shot dead, never to return in a sequel. In 1974 he got the role for which he will probably be best remembered, as wry private eye Jim Rockford in the classic The Rockford Files (1974). This became his second major television hit, with Noah Beery Jr. and Stuart Margolin, and in 1977 he won an Emmmy for his portrayal. However, a combination of injuries and the discovery that Universal Pictures' "creative bookkeeping" would not give him any of the huge profits the show generated soon soured him and the show ended in 1980. In the 1980s Garner appeared in few movies, but the ones he did make were darker than the likable Garner of old. These included Tank (1984) and Murphy's Romance (1985). For the latter, he was nominated for both the Academy Award and a Golden Globe. Returning to the western mode, he co-starred with the young Bruce Willis in Sunset (1988), a mythical story of Wyatt Earp, Tom Mix and 1920s Hollywood.

    In the 1990s Garner received rave reviews for his role in the acclaimed television movie about corporate greed, Barbarians at the Gate (1993). After that he appeared in the theatrical remake of his old television series, Maverick (1994), opposite Mel Gibson. Most of his appearances after that were in numerous TV movies based upon The Rockford Files (1974).

  16. #2416
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    Space Cowboys! And they look like they had a lot of fun making it as well.

    Think I might give that an airing tonight.

  17. #2417
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    And there's your third actor.



    'Pan's Labyrinth' Actor Alex Angulo Dies at 61
    9:28 AM PST 07/21/2014 by Benjamin Jones

    MADRID – Alex Angulo, a veteran Spanish film, television and stage actor who starred in Oscar winner Pan’s Labyrinth, died in a car accident over the weekend. He was 61.

    He starred in some 60 films.

    Trained as a teacher, Angulo switched to acting at the age of 23 when he joined a theater company in his native Basque region and got his start in the movies when he was cast by film director Alex de la Iglesia in Accion Mutante in 1993.

    Angulo was nominated for a best actor honor at Spain's Goya Awards on three occasions by the Spanish Film Academy. The nominations were for his roles in De la Iglesia’s The Day of the Beast and Dying of Laughter, as well as and The Great Vazquez.

    Internationally, Angulo was best known for his role as an anti-Francoist doctor in dark fantasy Pan’s Labyrinth, directed by Mexican director Guillermo del Toro.

    The film won three Oscars in 2007 for best cinematography, makeup and art direction and was nominated for original screenplay, music and best foreign language film awards.

  18. #2418
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    Page 97...

    Who will bring up the 100 pages of dead persons?

    I hope it is somebody eminent and dignified like Michael Gambon and not somebody silly like one of the motorcycle cops from CHiPs

  19. #2419
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    Writer, producer and director John Fasano died in his sleep Saturday night. He was 52.

    JULY 21, 2014 | 06:25PM PT
    Carmel Dagan


    In a career that career spanned more than 25 years, Fasano had more than 40 credits on feature films and primetime television as a writer, director or producer.

    His feature credits include “Another 48 Hrs.,” “Tombstone,” “Universal Soldier: The Return” and “Alien 3,” as well as developing the stories for “Alien vs. Predator,” “Flushed Away,” “Ex-1,” Marvel Comics’ “Werewolf by Night” and, most recently, writing “Sniper 5,” “Sniper Reloaded” and “Hostel: Part III.”

    In television, Fasano wrote more than 17 movies, including TNT’s “The Hunchback,” for which he received a Writers Guild Award nomination in 1996; the Tom Selleck hit “Stone Cold”; the Iraq war docudrama “Saving Jessica Lynch”; and Westerns such as “The Legend of Butch and Sundance” and “Hannah’s Law.”

    In the digital space, John created and wrote “Woke Up Dead,” a series for Sony’s Crackle site featuring Jon Heder and Josh Gad.

    He also worked as a script doctor and screenwriting guest lecturer at AFI and the Writer’s Boot Camp. He was president of the screenwriting seminar at the Sony/Canal+ Equinoxe screenwriting seminar in France.

    Fasano began his film career unofficially at the age of 8 when he was asked to take coffee to Ben Gazarra on the set of John Cassavetes’ “Husbands” while it was shooting in his hometown of Port Washington, New York. Strongly bitten by the filmmaking bug, Fasano started making 8mm films using armatured clay and Aurora models. His first official film jobs came while he was still attending Paul D. Schreiber High School, working on “industrial” films for IBM. Still a teenager, he was becoming a regularly published artist making public appearances with the National Cartoonist’s Society. While studying at the State University of New York, Purchase, he was also employed as the film research editor for Time/Life publication TV Cable Week.

    Upon graduation, Fasano became a freelance magazine editor and art director for a variety of specialty magazines. At this time he was also creating the artwork for grindhouse films such as “Tenement (Slaughter in the South Bronx)” and “Driller.” His work creating posters led to a break from producer Jack Bravman, who hired him to direct a low-budget horror film called “Zombie Nightmare.” While completing two magazine editions a month, John returned to film by producing and directing the now cult classic horror films “Rock ‘n Roll Nightmare” and “Black Roses.” He moved to Los Angeles and within four months sold his first spec script, “Tailgunners,” to Morgan Creek. Immediately after this sale, Fasano was offered the job of writing Walter Hill’s “Another 48 Hrs.” and then handpicked to fly to the set and rewrite the script for Tombstone for which he received an associate producer’s credit.

    The U.S. Department of the Army presented him with the Commander’s Award for Public Service — the fourth highest public service honorary award that may be granted to a private citizen — for directing and writing the documentary “Army Strong — Technology of the 21st Century.”

    Fasano is survived by his wife, Edie; children Lucia and John Cody; and his sister, Felicia Fasano, who is a casting director.

  20. #2420
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    MADRID – Alex Angulo, a veteran Spanish film, television and stage actor who starred in Oscar winner Pan’s Labyrinth, died in a car accident over the weekend. He was 61.
    Hey, bummer !
    I liked that movie. You never know when a car accident will take you away.

    Apparently he was a person that stood out for his extraordinary kindness.

    According to El Pais, Angulo died when the car he was driving veered off the road in Fuenmayor, Spain.

  21. #2421
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    Certainly had an unusual technique. RIP.

    Port Vale: Valiants' legend Ray King dies in Thailand aged 89
    By The Sentinel | Posted: July 22, 2014



    PORT Vale legend Ray King has suddenly died at the age of 89 in his adopted home of Thailand.

    The man who played in goal when the Valiants famously reached the semi-finals of the FA Cup in 1954, passed away on Saturday after a short illness. He was cremated yesterday at a Thai temple in Bangkok.

    His son, Gary King, told the Sentinel: “He had been in hospital as he had had a nasty fall.

    “He did not break any bones, but there was appalling bruising so I had to take him to hospital.

    “At hospital, he did not adjust very well and he pleaded with me to take him home. Just an hour-and-a-half after I did, his heart stopped.

    “I was desperately hoping he could come through to his 90th birthday next month, but it wasn’t to be.

    “He told me a couple of days before he died that he had led a great life, done everything he had wanted to do, travelled all around the world, and could not have asked for any more if this was to be his time.”

    King, who played more than 250 games for Port Vale between 1949 and 1957, was born in Northumberland on August 15, 1924.

    He began his youth career at Newcastle United, and went on to play for Leyton Orient and Ashington before signing for Vale.

    Gary King added: “He always spoke positively about his time at Port Vale and I think he gave his best displays of superlative goalkeeping during his time there.

    “I was just a toddler at the time, but he often used to talk since to us about his time with Port Vale.

    “He was one of those extraordinary people who are very good at any game involving a ball. He was a good tennis player, a good golfer, a good snooker player, a superb table tennis player and a superb cricketer.

    “But he was a genius in goal. He could kick the ball with both feet and would command his area every time there was a cross.

    “He played against all the great… Tom Finney, Stanley Matthews.

    “He had an encyclopaedic knowledge of the players of the 1940s and 50s, and could name them all the players and who they all played for.

    “I often came home from work out here and sit outside with a glass of wine and talk to him about the day’s sporting events.”

    King, who was thought to be the oldest surviving Port Vale player until his death, arrived at the club at the start of as golden era.

    Under the management of Freddie Steele, the Valiants won the Third Division North title in 1953/54, and reached the semi-finals if the FA Cup in 1954, losing a controversial match against West Brom 2-1 at a packed Villa Park. On the way to the semi-final, the famously knocked out cup-holders Blackpool, who had Stanley Matthews in their ranks.

    His post-football career involved Ray continuing his love of writing as well as taking up shiatsu, a Japanese message technique.

    His books included Hands, Feet and Balls, and To the End of the Road which was released in 2011.

    “He was especially interested in sports injuries and people with physical ailments and had a gift in his hands to treat people that the hospital had just given up on.

    “He was amazing at it, it was a gift, and that is what he did in his later career until he got too old for that because of possible arthritis.

    “My parents would come over to see me in New York and it was there that he took a course in Shiatsu.

    “He then devoted much more of his time to writing and he was a regular writer for the Bangkok Post where he would have an article in once a week.

    “It was about 80 or 90 per cent football but he would also write about cricket and he also wrote something on Wimbledon.

    “He was very interested in writing and wrote two volumes of his memoirs.

    “He wrote them all himself not a ghost writer and would write them all in long hand and he would transcribe them in to autobiographical form.”

    Ray moved to Thailand five years ago after the death of his wife, Norma.

    Gary said: “He and my mother had been here every year for seven years and stayed for four months during the English winter and they both loved Thailand.

    “My mother passed away in September 2009 and my dad was on his own and I could not let him live alone in England so I flew back and brought him back to Thailand and he stayed here.

    “The fortunate thing about being in Thailand was that I was able to afford a full-time housekeeper which I could not have done in London or New York.”

  22. #2422
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    Dora Bryan: Summer Wine and Ab Fab actress dies aged 91



    Bryan was made an OBE for services to drama in 1996
    • Dora Bryan, the veteran British actress whose long career encompassed theatre, film, radio and television, has died in Hove, near Brighton, at the age of 91.


    She was best known for her roles in Last of the Summer Wine and Absolutely Fabulous, and won a best actress Bafta for the 1962 film A Taste Of Honey.

    Her grandson Sam said her "longevity as an actress had been truly incredible".

    She died at the Sussex County Hospital in Brighton, with her sons Daniel and William at her bedside.

    Daniel told the Argus newspaper: "It was heartbreaking but it was peaceful. "She just left us.

    "She was a tiny woman but her constitution was incredible. She loved being on stage, that's what she wanted. Not only did she do it, but she was good at it.
    "She was a star, and a mum."

    Watch a clip of Dora Bryan's performance in the classic 1961 film A Taste of Honey

    Born Dora May Broadbent in Southport, Lancashire, the actress made her stage debut aged 12 before working with Ensa, the armed forces' entertainment body, during World War II.

    After moving to London, she was encouraged to change her surname by Noel Coward while appearing in a production of his play Private Lives.

    The actress chose Bryant as her new stage name, after the match manufacturers Bryant and May, but became Dora Bryan when a theatre programme omitted the last letter.

    She went on to play the title role in Hello, Dolly on stage and make appearances in such films as The Blue Lamp, Carry On Sergeant and The Great St Trinian's Train Robbery.


    Bryan recording Much Binding in the Marsh in 1953 with (l to r) Kenneth Horne, Richard Murdoch, Sam Costa and Nicholas Parsons



    She was also heard on radio in Hancock's Half Hour and alongside Nicholas Parsons and Kenneth Horne in the comedy series Much Binding in the Marsh.

    Bryan, who became an OBE in 1996, headlined a number of stage revues and made several appearances at the National Theatre.

    She had a recurring role in Absolutely Fabulous as June Whitfield's on-screen friend Dolly and was seen as Ros Utterthwaite in Last of the Summer Wine.

    In real life she endured several hardships. She suffered two nervous breakdowns, her adopted daughter Georgina died from alcoholism and her husband, cricketer Bill Lawton, died from Alzheimer's in 2008.

    She was also afflicted by short-term memory loss that affected her ability to learn lines and led to her retirement in 2006.

    Lionel Blair was among those paying tribute to the actress on Twitter.

    "So very sad to hear of the passing of my good friend Dora Bryan," he wrote. "She was wonderful

  23. #2423
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    Die Hard actor James Shigeta dies, aged 81
    By Jamie Harris



    Asian-American actor James Shigeta has died, aged 81.

    Shigeta made several television and movie appearances throughout his career, notably in the first Die Hard film.

    The actor played executive Joseph Takagi in the 1988 movie, who is shot by Hans Gruber (Alan Rickman) after refusing to surrender the security code to the skyscraper's bank vault.

    Prior to Die Hard, Shigeta also starred in the 1961 film adaptation of Broadway musical Flower Drum Song as Wang Ta.

    The Honolulu-born also appeared in Paradise, Hawaiian Style, Midway and Lost Horizon.

    His television credits include Hawaii 5-O, Perry Mason, Mission: Impossible, Ironside, and Beverly Hills 90210.


    Read more: Die Hard actor James Shigeta dies, aged 81 - Movies News - Digital Spy
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  24. #2424
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    A recognizable actor for me, but I had some difficulty remembering just where I recalled him from. I thought it was one of the Bond films, but it turns out it was a Sydney Pollack film from 1974 called The Yakuza. It's one of my favorite Robert Mitchum flicks from that era. R.I.P. James Shigeta.

  25. #2425
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    Yeah for me besides Die Hard, Midway and Hawaii 5.0 stand out the most..

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