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  1. #1451
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    Law and Order actor Dennis Farina dies at 69



    Dennis Farina, a tough-guy US actor who was a Chicago policeman for years before entering show business, has died aged 69, his publicist has said.

    Farina died in Scottsdale, Arizona, after developing a blood clot in his lung, publicist Lori De Waal said.

    He was recently known for his role as police detective Joe Fontana on New York-based cop show Law and Order.

    He also appeared as a mobster in action comedies such as Midnight Run (1988) and Get Shorty (1995).

    He is survived by his partner of 35 years, Marianne Cahill, three sons and six grandchildren.

    Farina appeared as Joe Fontana during the 2004-6 seasons of Law and Order, among other television appearances.

    He acted on the series Crime Story during the 1980s and most recently, starred alongside Dustin Hoffman in an HBO programme called Luck.

    Farina's first credited role was as a minor character in the 1981 Michael Mann film Thief.
    He also appeared in Saving Private Ryan and Out of Sight, and was a mainstay of the Chicago theatre scene.

    Farina was born in Chicago on 29 February 1944 and became an actor when he was almost 40, after spending many years as a Chicago police detective.

    In a 2004 interview with the Associated Press, Farina recalled his first day of work as an actor.

    "I remember going to the set that day and being intrigued by the whole thing," he said.
    "I liked it. And everybody was extremely nice to me. If the people were rude and didn't treat me right, things could have gone the other way."

  2. #1452
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    Boxing legend Emile Griffith, former world champion, dies at age 75



    Emile Griffith, the former boxing world champion, died on Tuesday at 75.
    The Associated Press on July 23, 2013 at 11:06 PM, updated July 23, 2013 at 11:07 PM

    Inside the smaller theater at Madison Square Garden about five years ago, shortly before a world title fight, Emile Griffith was introduced one more time to the crowd. He rose shakily from his seat, waved ever so briefly and then sat down.

    The applause kept going.

    Revered in retirement perhaps more than during his fighting days, Griffith died yesterday at 75 after a long battle with pugilistic dementia. The first fighter to be crowned world champion from the U.S. Virgin Islands, Griffith required full-time care late in life and died at an extended care facility in Hempstead, N.Y.

    An elegant fighter with a quick jab, Griffith’s brilliant career was overshadowed by the fatal beating he gave Benny "The Kid" Paret in a 1962 title bout. The outcome darkened the world of boxing, even prompting some network television stations to stop showing live fights.

    It also cast him as a pariah to many inside and outside the sport.

    He went on to have a successful career after that fatal fight, but Griffith acknowledged later in life that he was never the same boxer. He would fight merely to win, piling up the kind of decisions that are praised by purists but usually jeered by fans hoping for a knockout.

    The outpouring of love that he received from fans late in life stood in stark contrast to the way he was received after March 24, 1962, when he fought Paret before a national TV audience at the Garden. Griffith knocked out his bitter rival in the 12th round to regain his own welterweight title, and Paret went into a coma and died 10 days later.

    Known for his overwhelming speed and slick style, Griffith was a prodigy from the moment he stepped in Hall of Fame trainer Gil Clancy’s gym in Queens, N.Y. Griffith had been working in a hat factory when, as the story goes, he took off his shirt on a hot day and the factory owner noticed his muscles.

    Under the watchful eye of Clancy, Griffith blossomed into a New York Golden Gloves champion and eventually turned professional. He easily defeated the likes of Florentino Fernandez and Luis Rodriguez during an era when it was common to fight every couple of weeks.

    He quickly earned a title shot against Paret in 1961, winning the welterweight belt with a knockout in the 13th round. Griffith would lose it to Paret in a rematch five months later. After winning back the title during their controversial third fight,— many believe Paret never should have been allowed in the ring after a brutal loss to Gene Fullmer three months earlier — Griffith would eventually move up to middleweight. He knocked down Dick Tiger for the first time in his career and claimed the title with a narrow but unanimous decision.

    Griffith would go on to lose twice during a thrilling trilogy with Nino Benvenuti, his lone victory coming at Shea Stadium in 1967, and lost two bouts against the great middleweight Carlos Monzon. Griffith would finally retire in 1977 after losing his last three fights.

    He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1990 with a record of 85-24-2 and 23 knockouts.

    Griffith would go on to train several champions over the years, including Wilfred Benitez and Juan Laporte, among the most popular boxers in Puerto Rican history.

  3. #1453
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    ^^wasn't he in Santch too?

  4. #1454
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    Is that some kind of mexican soap opera?

  5. #1455
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smug Farang Bore View Post
    ^^wasn't he in Santch too?
    Snatch, yes, and he did it well.
    I especially liked him in get shorty.

  6. #1456
    Pronce. PH said so AGAIN!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koojo
    Snatch, yes, and he did it well. I especially liked him in get shorty.
    Agree, Farina was a really fun actor to watch.

    Cousin Avi was brilliant, "Yes, London. You know: fish, chips, cup 'o tea, bad food, worse weather, Mary fucking Poppins... LONDON."

  7. #1457
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    Djalma Santos dies at the age of 84
    By Paulo Freitas 2013-07-24 00:53:00



    Former Palmeiras and Brazilian national team player Djalma Santos has died in Uberaba at the age of 84. He is considered by many as the best right-back of all time.

    Djalma Santos was admitted to hospital on January 1 with pneumonia, his condition got worse yesterday after temporarily improving a few days earlier.

    He started his career in 1948 at Portuguesa, where he played for 11 years before joining Palmeiras in 1959, playing 501 games for the Verdão, and retired in 1970 at Atlético Paranaense.

    The right-back played four World Cups, winning the title in 1958 and 1962 and getting name in the best team of the competition three times.

    Djalma Santos was never sent off in his career, and was awarded the Belfort Duarte award for this reason.

  8. #1458
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    Two thumbs down....

    US film critic Roger Ebert dies at 70
    05 APR 2013 06:48 JILL SERJEANT



    Roger Ebert, who was the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize, has died in Chicago two days after he revealing his cancer had returned.

    "It is with a heavy heart we report that legendary film critic Roger Ebert [@ebertchicago] has passed away," the Chicago Sun-Times, the newspaper where Ebert (70) worked for decades, said on Twitter.

    "There is a hole that can't be filled. One of the greats has left us," the newspaper added.

    Ebert, who was dubbed by Forbes magazine in 2007 as the most powerful pundit in America, was one of the mostly widely read US movie critics, known for more than 40 years of insightful, sometimes sarcastic and often humorous reviews.

    "For a generation of Americans – and especially Chicagoans – Roger was the movies," President Barack Obama said in a statement. "When he didn't like a film, he was honest; when he did, he was effusive – capturing the unique power of the movies to take us somewhere magical."

    Ebert's reviews appeared in more than 200 newspapers and in 1975 he won the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism, the first film critic to do so.

    But his most visible role was as one of the hosts of a popular television movie review show with Gene Siskel, a reviewer from the rival Chicago Tribune. The programme began airing in the 1970s on a Chicago public television station and eventually ran nationally under various names, including Siskel & Ebert.

    'Two thumbs up!'
    The sometimes sparring pair later trademarked their "Two thumbs up!" seal of approval for movies. After Siskel died in 1999 at age 53 due to complications from surgery for a brain tumour, Ebert teamed with critic Richard Roeper on another movie review show. He later left the programme for health reasons.

    Ebert lost his ability to speak and eat after surgeries for thyroid and salivary gland cancer in 2002 and 2003 and again in 2006. But it did not stop him from working.

    On Tuesday, Ebert had posted a blog entry saying he was taking a "leave of presence" and scaling back his work after doctors diagnosed his cancer had returned.

    He said it was discovered by doctors after he fractured his hip in December. "The 'painful fracture' that made it difficult for me to walk has recently been revealed to be a cancer," Ebert said in the blog posting, giving no further details about the type of cancer or diagnosis. "I am not going away," he added. "My intent is to continue to write selected reviews ... What's more, I'll be able at last to do what I've always fantasized about doing: reviewing only the movies I want to review."

    News of Ebert's death provoked an outpouring of tributes on Twitter. "A great man. I miss him already," tweeted Roeper, his fellow Sun-Times film critic and TV co-host.

    "Millions of thumbs up for you," wrote documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, referring to his catchphrase.

    Comedian Steve Martin tweeted: "Goodbye Roger Ebert, we had fun. The balcony is closed."

    "Rest in Peace, Roger. You were simply the best," wrote Jaws actor Richard Dreyfuss on Twitter.

    Movie books, screenplay, cookbook
    Born on June 18 1942, in Urbana, Illinois, south of Chicago, Ebert attended the University of Illinois and was editor of the school newspaper, the Daily Illini.

    From 1958 until 1966, he worked at the News Gazette in Champaign-Urbana, where he had snagged a job as a sportswriter at the age of 15, then moved to the Chicago Sun-Times in 1967.

    Along with film criticism, Ebert authored several books on movies and filmmakers, including 1980s Werner Herzog: Images at the Horizon, about the famed director, as well as titles like I Hated, Hated, Hated This Movie, in 2000.

    He even co-wrote the screenplay for the 1970 film Beyond the Valley of the Dolls.

    But it was reviewing movies that Ebert loved most and he was prolific at cranking out criticism. In print, his reviews were voluminous and omnivorous, reflecting an encyclopedic knowledge about and appetite for the genre.

    He liked to say he would go out of his way to review foreign films, documentaries and little-known independent movies that other critics passed on, and he cranked out hundreds of reviews and essays annually.

    Ebert's earlier bouts of cancer cost him his lower jaw. He communicated through notes and a mechanised voice as well as on the internet, but he could not eat normally and received nutrition through a tube.

    "I can remember the taste and smell of everything, even though I can no longer taste or smell," he told a New York Times interviewer in 2010, when Ebert published a cookbook, The Pot and How to Use It.

    "The jokes, gossip, laughs, arguments and shared memories I miss," he wrote of missing out on the talk at table. – Reuters

  9. #1459
    The Pikey Hunter
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    Quote Originally Posted by quimbian corholla View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Koojo
    Snatch, yes, and he did it well. I especially liked him in get shorty.
    Agree, Farina was a really fun actor to watch.

    Cousin Avi was brilliant, "Yes, London. You know: fish, chips, cup 'o tea, bad food, worse weather, Mary fucking Poppins... LONDON."
    Customs official: Anything to declare?
    Avi: Yeah. Don't go to England.

  10. #1460
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    Virginia Johnson, who with her ex-husband and research partner William Masters blazed new trails in the study of human sexuality, has died at the age of 88, US media reported.

    Saint Louis Public Radio said Thursday her death was confirmed by her son Scott Johnson and by a retirement home in the Missouri city where she lived.

    The cause of death was not disclosed.

    Born in the Midwestern state into a family with Mormon roots, Johnson met Masters, an obstetrician-gynecologist 10 years her senior, in 1957 at Western University in Saint Louis, where he hired her as a research assistant.

    With polygraph-like instruments and hundreds of volunteers, Masters and Johnson researched what they called a four-stage “sexual response cycle” that they documented in best-selling books in the 1960s.

    In 1964 they set up a non-profit research center in Saint Louis that came to be known as the Masters and Johnson Institute.

    It closed its doors after 30 years when Masters — who died in 2001 at age 85 — retired.

    Masters and Johnson’s research helped stir the so-called “sexual revolution” in the United States, landed them on the cover of Time magazine in 1970 and brought Hollywood stars to their doorstep seeking help with their sex lives.

    The duo married in 1971, but divorced in 1992.


    Their life and work is the subject of a one-hour television drama, “Masters of Sex,” starring Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan, that is scheduled to premiere in September on the Showtime cable channel.

  11. #1461
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    US singer-songwriter JJ Cale dies, aged 74




    After Midnight, the song that brought fame for JJ Cale

    US singer-songwriter JJ Cale has died of heart attack at the age of 74.

    An announcement on his personal website said he had passed away at a hospital in La Jolla, California, on Friday.

    Born in Oklahoma, Cale helped create the Tulsa Sound, which combined blues, rockabilly, and country.

    He became famous in 1970, when Eric Clapton covered his song After Midnight.

    In 1977 Clapton also popularised Cale's Cocaine. The two worked together on an album which won a Grammy award in 2008.

    Born in 1938, John Weldon Cale adopted the name JJ Cale to avoid being confused with John Cale of the Velvet Underground.

    Building up on the success of After Midnight, he recorded Naturally - the first of his 14 studio albums.

    He pioneered the use of drum machines, and was famous for his personal laid-back singing style.

    However Cale always described himself as a songwriter rather than a singer, and his songs tended to enjoy greater success when performed by others - notably Tom Petty, Santana and Lynyrd Skynyrd.

  12. #1462
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    *** Sad news, a great songwriter.

  13. #1463
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    If I'd heard this a few years ago, I would have gone on a weeklong reefer bender.

    I just love his earlier music.

  14. #1464
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    I was singing 'Call me the Breeze' in my head today on the way home from the mall.
    I'm gonna be on a downer for the next few days.

    Thanks for the great music JJ.

  15. #1465
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    Eileen Brennan, the veteran actress perhaps best known for her role as the good-hearted Texas waitress in Peter Bogdanovich’s The Last Picture Show, has died. She was 80.

    Brennan died early Sunday at a hospice in Burbank of bladder cancer, her publicist told The Hollywood Reporter.

    Brennan also received an Oscar nomination for best supporting actress playing tough captain Doreen Lewis opposite Goldie Hawn in the fish-out-of-water comedy Private Benjamin (1980).

  16. #1466
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    Belated condolences to family & fans of the late Robert G Barrett,
    aka Les Norton, knock about Aussie author, who took the piss
    out of the Poms like no one else, fuck me, living in Thailand is like
    living in a cave sometimes.

    R.I.P. Les , I will miss you.

  17. #1467
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    Quote Originally Posted by peaches View Post
    Belated condolences to family & fans of the late Robert G Barrett,
    aka Les Norton, knock about Aussie author, who took the piss
    out of the Poms like no one else, fuck me, living in Thailand is like
    living in a cave sometimes.

    R.I.P. Les , I will miss you.
    first i have heard of it, mate, he was a cracker,always had a good laugh with his books.

  18. #1468
    Thailand Expat Bobcock's Avatar
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    He took the piss out of Poms for a living?

    Wow.... Making money out of his inherited inferiority complex..... Good Effort, KW and WDR don't get a penny from theirs.....

  19. #1469
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    The Klingon Empire reported Commander Kang's passing to Sto'Vo'Kor.



  20. #1470
    Member peaches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcock
    Wow.... Making money out of his inherited inferiority complex.....
    Mate.... he would have pissed himself laughing at that weak kneed comment.

  21. #1471
    Thailand Expat Bobcock's Avatar
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    would've..... can't....

  22. #1472
    Member peaches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobcock
    would've.....
    Would've is an abbreviation of would have, whats your point

  23. #1473
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    weak kneed comment

    Err your doing it now....lol

  24. #1474
    Member peaches's Avatar
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    So you are, sorry I mean you're pedantic too S F B.

  25. #1475
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    No no...

    Your alright mate - on ya go!


    I'll leave you to bobcock...!

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