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  1. #1326
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    Jonathan Winters 1925-2013

    One of the funniest men there ever was.

    Goodbye you wonderfully crazy man.

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    Mork and Mindy star Jonathan Winters dies at 87



    Winters (bottom) played Robin Williams' on-screen son, Mearth


    US comedian and actor Jonathan Winters - best known for his role in sitcom Mork and Mindy - has died aged 87.

    A pioneer of improvisational stand-up comedy, he influenced a generation of comedians including Robin Williams, Jim Carrey and Steve Martin.

    On the big screen, he appeared in films such as It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World and The Loved One.

    But it was his role as Williams's on-screen son in Mork and Mindy that brought him international fame.

    The 1981-82 show saw him play Mearth, the off-spring of an alien race that ages backwards, who - having hatched from a giant egg - was the size of an adult but had the mind of a child.


    Williams paid tribute to the actor saying: "First he was my idol, then he was my mentor and amazing friend. I'll miss him huge. He was my Comedy Buddha."

    Other comics also took to Twitter to pay their respects including Carrey who said Winters was "the worthy custodian of a sparkling and childish comedic genius".


    Steve Carell said he was "wildly funny" while Kathy Griffin said "there was no-one like him".

    Dick Van Dyke added: "The first time I saw Jonathan Winters perform, I thought I might as well quit the business. Because I could never be as brilliant."





    Robin Williams said Winters had been his 'mentor and amazing friend'

    Born in Dayton, Ohio, Winters joined the Marines aged 17 and served two years in the South Pacific.

    In the early 1950s, after stints as a radio disc jockey and TV host in his home state, he moved to New York where he became a nightclub comic doing impressions of John Wayne and Cary Grant, as well as creating new characters of his own.

    He also made regular appearances on The Tonight Show with hosts Jack Paar and then Johnny Carson, The Andy Williams Show and his own TV variety shows - The Jonathan Winters Show and The Wacky World of Jonathan Winters - in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

    In later years, his voice talents were used on many cartoons and animated films.

    He played three characters in the Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle movie in 2000 and he provided the voice of Papa Smurf in the 2011 Smurfs film - a role he reprised for its sequel due for release this July.

    Winters won a best supporting actor Emmy for playing Randy Quaid's father in the sitcom Davis Rules in 1991. He was nominated again in 2003 as outstanding guest actor in a comedy series for an appearance on Life With Bonnie.

    He also won two Grammys - one for his work on The Little Prince album in 1975 another for his Crank Calls comedy album in 1996.

    He also won the Kennedy Center's Mark Twain Prize for humour in 1999, a year after Richard Pryor.

    Winters' friend, Joe Petro, said the actor died at his California home of natural causes surrounded by friends and family. He is survived by two children.

  3. #1328
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    My funny Korean Dr woman is learning English and likes to read trashy novels like 50 Shades of Grey. She came home with a copy of The Fog one day which brought back memories of the horror books from James Herbert that I used to read when I was a kid.

    I downloaded The Rats to read it again (it is really much trashier than I remembered).

    Anyway she emailed to say she is reading The Lair so I googled up James Herbert's website to send her a link to the favourite author of my teenage years and it turns out that he died just 4 weeks ago. There was nothing in the news that I remember although I think he is quite famous despite his writing not being of high literary standing.

    Anyway RIP James Herbert - master of gory horror (with lots of rude bits).

    1943 - 2013

    Meet the author | JAMES HERBERT

    Original 1970's cover of The rats


  4. #1329
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    When James Herbert published his first novel, The Rats (1974), at the age of 30, it was an immediate bestseller. Copies of the book – produced cheaply in paperback with a vicious-looking rodent on the cover, its jaws open and eyes bloodshot – flew off the shelves, the initial print run of 100,000 selling out in three weeks. Behind its cover star, the title was printed in bold, red type. Edition after edition came out and changes were subtly made. The rat remained but eventually it was the name of Herbert, who has died aged 69, that dominated the cover.

    Herbert's early novels were literary nasties. The Rats opens with a tramp being devoured alive. Soon afterwards, a baby is killed and partly eaten before her mother can rescue the mutilated body. The Fog (1975) continued his uncompromisingly explicit, visceral exploration of horror. Innocent villagers and schoolchildren turn psychotic under the influence of a mysterious fog, and torture and murder each other. The gruesome and depraved events seem all the more horrific for taking place in rural, respectable England.

    These novels of catastrophe were compared by Stephen King to the music of the Sex Pistols: "If The Rats, with its scenes of gruesome horror and its blasted East End landscape, is not a literary version of Anarchy in the UK, what is?" But just as a host of brutal horror novels was unleashed in bookshops in the wake of Herbert's success, its progenitor changed tack and took his readers into other fearful territories, while the paperback horror genre collapsed under the weight of Rats rip-offs and sub-Herbert savagery.

    Herbert's 23 novels have sold 54m copies worldwide. He was published in 34 languages, including Russian and Chinese. In 2010 he was made an OBE and received the Grand Master award at the World Horror Convention.

    He was born in the East End of London, the third son of Herbert Herbert and his wife, Kitty. His parents sold fruit and veg from stalls at Brick Lane and Bethnal Green. Growing up in Whitechapel, which was damaged by bombing during the second world war, Herbert attended a local Catholic school and earned a scholarship to St Aloysius' college in Highgate, north London.

    As a boy, Herbert was inspired by the American comic book Casey Ruggles, which he found on the market stalls in Petticoat Lane. "That's where I learned to write," he said. "For a cowboy comic, it was incredible. The only time I wrote a fan letter in my life was to [its writer and artist] Warren Tufts and that was when I was 30. I rang up Hanna-Barbera because somebody told me he was working there as an animator and got his address, wrote a letter and got a cautious reply back." His next letter – 11 pages explaining his appreciation of Ruggles – led to Herbert and Tufts becoming penpals.

    He also grew up on ghost stories and American horror comics that his brother Peter brought home. There were the additional real-life horrors of the Whitechapel area: one of Jack the Ripper's victims had been murdered close to Herbert's home, and a more immediate menace could be found in the stables where his parents' stock of fruit and vegetables attracted hordes of rats.

    From the age of 16, Herbert attended Hornsey College of Art, where he spent four years studying graphic design, print and photography. He worked as a paste-up artist and a typographer at one advertising agency, and then became art director and subsequently group head at Charles Barker Advertising.

    Herbert had no burning desire to become an author but found himself surrounded by copywriters who were working on novels in order to get out of advertising.

    Looking for a challenge, he decided to write a novel himself. Inspired by an image he saw during a late-night showing of Dracula (1931) starring Bela Lugosi – a scene in which Renfield has a vision of thousands of rats – Herbert poured his energies into The Rats for 10 months and sent out six copies of his finished manuscript to publishers. Three weeks later, he had three replies: two rejections and, from New English Library (NEL), an acceptance.

    The Survivor (1976), his third novel, concerned the sole survivor of a plane crash who begins to experience visions of the afterlife. Fluke (1977) was an even greater departure, in which a murdered man, reincarnated as a dog, tracks down his family and solves the mystery surrounding his death. In the thriller The Spear (1978), a private eye finds himself involved with a neo-Nazi cult that plans to use the power of the spear that pierced the side of Christ to take over the world. The book's brief, historical prefaces led to problems, when Herbert and NEL were sued for plagiarism. These sections were removed for the paperback edition which, thanks to the notoriety of the case, returned Herbert to the bestseller charts.

    With his next novel, Lair (1979), Herbert regaled readers with the return of the rats, and he completed the trilogy with Domain (1984), set in a future where rats are now dominant following a nuclear war that has devastated civilisation.

    Herbert's The City (1994), a graphic novel illustrated by Ian Miller, was set in the same post-apocalypse world in which only a handful of people have survived.

    An ancient force is at the centre of The Dark (1980), which was reminiscent of The Fog, and the bane of bad luck dogs a policeman in The Jonah (1981). In Shrine (1983), a deaf-mute girl blessed with the power of healing discovers that it is actually a curse, and in Moon (1985) a man finds himself telepathically linked to a serial killer.

    With The Magic Cottage (1986), Herbert created one of his best novels, an unconventional haunted house yarn that is part fairytale, part ghost story.

    Haunted (1988), originally plotted as a BBC TV movie, is also a ghost story, the first of three novels featuring David Ash, a sceptical parapsychologist and psychic investigator who returned in The Ghosts of Sleath (1994) and Ash (2012).

    The best of Herbert's later books were more character-driven. Creed (1990)
    features a sleazy paparazzo who can photograph things invisible to the naked eye; Others (1999) introduces Nicholas Dismas, a private investigator with physical defects; and The Secret of Crickley Hall (2006) relates how a couple move to the West Country to try to recover from the disappearance of their son. It was adapted for BBC TV in 2012.

    The film and TV versions of Herbert's other novels were not always successful: The Survivor (1981), directed by David Hemmings and starring Robert Powell, was shot in Australia and heavily cut for UK release. Rats (1982), released in the US as Deadly Eyes, featured dachshunds in rodent costumes. Haunted and Fluke (both 1995) received mixed reviews.

    Calling upon his background in typography and design, Herbert saw his books all the way through from the first draft, written in longhand in jumbo pads, to the finished product. He was actively involved in the presentation and promotion of his work.

    He is survived by his wife, Eileen, whom he married in 1967, and their daughters, Kerry, Emma and Casey.

  5. #1330
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    Pink Floyd album designer Storm Thorgerson dies



    Mr Thorgerson famously designed the cover artwork of Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon


    Storm Thorgerson, whose album cover artwork includes Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon, has died aged 69, the band's management has confirmed.

    A childhood friend of the founding members of the band, he became their designer-in-chief, fashioning a string of eye-catching creations.

    He designed the cover showing a prism spreading a spectrum of colour for The Dark Side Of The Moon.

    His credits also include albums by Led Zeppelin, Peter Gabriel and Muse.
    His family released a statement saying he died peacefully on Thursday surrounded by family and friends.

    "He had been ill for some time with cancer though he had made a remarkable recovery from his stroke in 2003," it said.

    "He is survived by his mother Vanji, his son Bill, his wife Barbie Antonis and her two children Adam and Georgia."

    Pink Floyd guitarist and vocalist Dave Gilmour released a statement in which he said the artworks Thorgerson created for the band had been "an inseparable part of our work".

    He said: "We first met in our early teens. We would gather at Sheep's Green, a spot by the river in Cambridge and Storm would always be there holding forth, making the most noise, bursting with ideas and enthusiasm. Nothing has ever really changed.

    "He has been a constant force in my life, both at work and in private, a shoulder to cry on and a great friend. I will miss him."

  6. #1331
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    Mike Denness, the only Scottish-born cricketer to have captained England, has died of cancer at the age of 72.

    A stylish batsman who played county cricket for Kent and Essex, Denness captained England in 19 of his 28 Tests and scored 25,886 first-class runs.

    Leading England in the disappointing 1974-75 Ashes tour, he famously dropped himself for the fourth Test in Sydney.

    Denness, who was Kent president, was awarded an OBE in the New Year's Honours List four months ago.

    It was during his time as Kent captain that Denness experienced his greatest success, winning the John Player League three times, the Benson and Hedges Cup twice and the Gillette Cup once.

    But he will also be remembered for overseeing one of the game's biggest controversies during a spell as ICC match referee.

    Denness's decision to sanction six Indian players, including Sachin Tendulkar, during a Test match against South Africa in Port Elizabeth in 2001-02 caused a furore that led to both teams barring him from officiating in the next match.

  7. #1332
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    Patrick Garland, theatre producer and director, dies aged 78


    Patrick Garland and Alexandra Bastedo were married in Chichester Cathedral in 1980


    One of British theatre's most distinguished producers and directors, Patrick Garland, has died at the age of 78, it has been announced.

    His wife, actress Alexandra Bastedo, was at his bedside at Worthing Hospital in West Sussex where he was admitted following a long illness.

    Garland was the only director to have had four plays running in the West End of London at the same time.

    He was also artistic director of Chichester Festival Theatre twice.

    Garland worked with many stars of stage and film, including Rex Harrison on Broadway in a revival of My Fair Lady, about whom he also wrote a best-selling biography, The Incomparable Rex.

    He won a Golden Globe for his 1971 film The Snow Goose which was also nominated for a Bafta and an Emmy.

    During his time at Chichester, he raised money to build and open the West Sussex theatre's second space, The Minerva Theatre, from where many productions have transferred to London.


    'Wonderful man'

    After beginning his career as an actor Garland joined the BBC, where he directed programmes for Huw Wheldon on the arts programme Monitor, working alongside Melvyn Bragg and Ken Russell.

    He founded the Poetry International foundation with Ted Hughes and wrote several distinguished books of poetry himself.

    In 1989, Garland was invited to direct the thanksgiving service for his friend Lord Olivier at Westminster Cathedral.

    Bastedo, who married Garland at Chichester Cathedral in 1980, described him as a "wonderful man" who was a staunch supporter of the animal rescue charity she runs from their home.

    "Patrick had been ill for a long time but bore all of his troubles with great fortitude," she said.

    "He was a wonderful man, brilliant with people of all types, and life will never be the same."

    A private funeral service will be held with a memorial service at Chichester Cathedral at a later date.

  8. #1333
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    Divinyls singer Chrissy Amphlett Dead

    Chrissy Amphlett dead at 53

    Former Divinyls singer Chrissy Amphlett has died in New York after a long battle with cancer.

    Amphlett, 53, lived in New York with her husband, former Divinyls drummer Charley Drayton.

    The Geelong-born Amphlett, the cousin of the 1960s pop icon ''Little Pattie'' Thompson, rose to fame as the feisty lead singer of the Divinyls, who formed in 1980.

    Famous for Amphlett's sexy schoolgirl outfit, torn fishnets and wild on-stage antics, the Divinyls had their first hits, Boys in Town and Only Lonely, after appearing in the 1982 film Monkey Grip.

    They had four Top 10 albums in Australia and one in the US. Their biggest-selling single, I Touch Myself, in 1991, was a No.1 hit in Australia, and made the Top 10 in the US and Britain.

    The band was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame in 2006, and, after a tour in 2007, split up.
    Speaking to Fairfax in 2010, Amphlett said while her initial diagnosis had "thrown her for six", she was determined to continue recording.

    Dead at 53: Chrissy Amphlett.
    "I'll get over it - I've got songs to sing, I've got stages to perform on. I'm a keep-on-going sort of girl,'' she said.
    Because of her MS, Amphlett had said she was unable to receive radiation treatment for the cancer.




    Last edited by TizMe; 22-04-2013 at 02:28 PM.

  9. #1334
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    It bothers me that Jonathan Winters is remembered for Mork and Mindy first. He had a lot of radio comedy prior to even being on the tube. As for video, I remember him most for his role in 'It's a Mad Mad World' RIP.

  10. #1335
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  11. #1336
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Lick View Post
    Patrick Garland, theatre producer and director, dies aged 78


    Patrick Garland and Alexandra Bastedo were married in Chichester Cathedral in 1980


    One of British theatre's most distinguished producers and directors, Patrick Garland, has died at the age of 78, it has been announced.

    His wife, actress Alexandra Bastedo, was at his bedside at Worthing Hospital in West Sussex where he was admitted following a long illness.

    Garland was the only director to have had four plays running in the West End of London at the same time.

    He was also artistic director of Chichester Festival Theatre twice.

    Garland worked with many stars of stage and film, including Rex Harrison on Broadway in a revival of My Fair Lady, about whom he also wrote a best-selling biography, The Incomparable Rex.

    He won a Golden Globe for his 1971 film The Snow Goose which was also nominated for a Bafta and an Emmy.

    During his time at Chichester, he raised money to build and open the West Sussex theatre's second space, The Minerva Theatre, from where many productions have transferred to London.


    'Wonderful man'

    After beginning his career as an actor Garland joined the BBC, where he directed programmes for Huw Wheldon on the arts programme Monitor, working alongside Melvyn Bragg and Ken Russell.

    He founded the Poetry International foundation with Ted Hughes and wrote several distinguished books of poetry himself.

    In 1989, Garland was invited to direct the thanksgiving service for his friend Lord Olivier at Westminster Cathedral.

    Bastedo, who married Garland at Chichester Cathedral in 1980, described him as a "wonderful man" who was a staunch supporter of the animal rescue charity she runs from their home.

    "Patrick had been ill for a long time but bore all of his troubles with great fortitude," she said.

    "He was a wonderful man, brilliant with people of all types, and life will never be the same."

    A private funeral service will be held with a memorial service at Chichester Cathedral at a later date.
    Met both of them when they lived in Chichester... I was a Bobby then and the town centre beat included their house in the Pallants and the Festival Theatre was an early morning tea stop. Such charming people...... this was in '78-79.

  12. #1337
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    Actor Allan Arbus, fom my favorite program, best known for his role as Army psychiatrist Sidney Freedman on the 1970s hit television series "M*A*S*H" and as the husband of the late photographer Diane Arbus, has died at the age of 95.
    Arbus, who gave up his photography for acting, passed away from congestive heart failure at his home in Los Angeles on Friday, his second wife Mariclare Costello Arbus told Reuters.
    "At 95, doctors didn't want to do surgery and Allan didn't want it at all," said Costello Arbus, an actress who married Arbus in 1976.
    "He just slowed down," she said. "He just got weaker and weaker and was at home with his daughter and me."
    Arbus' first major acting role came as Christ-like figure Jesse in director Robert Downey Sr.'s 1972 cult film Greaser's Palace, which also starred the director's young son, Robert Downey Jr.
    He shot to prominence the role of the acerbic psychiatrist Sidney Freedman on M*A*S*H in 1973, a year after the Korean War comedy-drama began.
    Arbus' final credited television role was in an episode of comedy Curb Your Enthusiasm in 2000, according to Hollywood database IMDB.com.
    Arbus was born in 1918 in New York and began his career as a photographer in the 1940s and served as an US Army photographer during World War II.
    In 1941, he married Diane Nemerov - who later earned artistic acclaim for her photos of marginalized people. The couple started a photography studio together which shot photos for magazines Vogue and Glamour, among others.
    The couple separated in 1959 and divorced a decade later. Diane Arbus committed suicide in 1971.
    Arbus is survived by his three children; Amy Arbus and Doon Arbus from his first marriage and Arin Arbus from his second.
    There can’t be good living where there is not good drinking

  13. #1338
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    RIP Allan
    You can pull down your pants and slide on the ice now

  14. #1339
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    ‘M*A*S*H’ Actor Allan Arbus Dead at 95



  15. #1340
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    I used to really like the character Sidney on MASH. A very sane person. So I'm happy to know that the actor who played him lasted till 95 yrs.
    I have heard there is a correlation between fame and longevity. Just as an example, the guy who played Frank Burns died quite young.

  16. #1341
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    Former Republic of Ireland midfielder Tony Grealish dies


    Former Republic of Ireland midfielder Tony Grealish, who captained Brighton & Hove Albion in the 1983 FA Cup final, has died at the age of 56.

    Grealish, who won 45 international caps between 1976 and 1986, had been battling against cancer.

    The Londoner made over 170 appearances for his first club Leyton Orient before moving to Luton Town in 1979.

    He signed for Brighton in 1981 and led them out at Wembley to face Manchester United in the final two years later.

    It remains Brighton's only appearance in the cup final and the team, under manager Jimmy Melia, drew the first match 2-2 before Ron Atkinson's United won the replay 4-0.

    Grealish went on to play for West Bromwich Albion, Manchester City, Rotherham United and Walsall before finishing his playing career at Bromsgrove Rovers in 1993.

    He scored eight goals for Ireland during his decade playing for the national side.

    Grealish was given his first Republic cap by then player-manager Johnny Giles but made his greatest impact in the green jersey during the reign of Eoin Hand.

    A hard-working midfielder, Grealish played alongside the likes of Liam Brady and Frank Stapleton in the Republic side which narrowly missed out on qualification for the 1982 World Cup finals.

    They earned home wins over beaten 1978 World Cup finalists Holland and France during the 1982 qualifying campaign but a controversial defeat in Belgium left Hand's side missing out on a place in Spain on goal difference

  17. #1342
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    George Jones, American country singer, dies aged 81





    George Jones speaking in September 2009 and performing his signature song, He Stopped Loving Her Today


    US country singer George Jones, who had a string of number one songs between the 1950s and 1990s, has died aged 81.

    Jones publicist, Kirt Webster, said the Grammy-winning singer was admitted to hospital for fever and irregular blood pressure and died on Friday.

    Nicknamed Possum, his signature song was He Stopped Loving Her Today, a track about love and death.

    He was married to Tammy Wynette between 1969 and 1975 and the pair recorded several songs together in the 1970s.

    Born in Texas on 12 September 1931, Jones played guitar for tips on the streets of Beaumont as a teenager before going on to serve in the US Marine Corps.

    He returned to Texas to record for the Starday label in Houston, achieving his first top ten hit in 1955 with Why Baby Why.

    Known for his precise baritone and evocative voice, Jones' first number one song, White Lightning, came in 1959, followed by Tender Years in 1961.

    Country star Garth Brooks paid tribute to the singer saying: "The greatest voice to ever grace country music will never die. Jones has a place in every heart that ever loved any kind of music."


    Jones and Wynette toured and recorded together during their marriage between 1969 and 1975



    Cocaine addiction

    Jones had a string of top 10 songs during the 1960s and 1970s including If Drinkin' Don't Kill Me (Her Memory Will), Window Up Above, She Thinks I Still Care, Good Year for the Roses, The Race Is On.

    But his battle with alcoholism and cocaine addiction frequently derailed his career and at one point his reputation for cancelling performances earned him the nickname No-Show Jones.

    Having divorced his second wife in 1968, Jones married Wynette a year later. The pairing was an enormous professional success for both as they recorded and toured together, recording several tracks including We're Gonna Hold On, Golden Ring and Near You.

    However as Jones' addiction problem worsened, so too did his marriage to Wynette, who later claimed he once came at her with a gun.



    Jones was best known for his 1980 track He Stopped Loving Her Today


    They divorced in 1975 but later resumed recording together. The couple's only daughter, Tamala is also a country singer under the name Georgette Jones.

    Jones recorded the track He Stopped Loving Her Today in 1980. The song, which he said was his favourite, revived a flagging career and won him the Country Music Award's top male vocalist award in 1980 and 1981. He also earned a Grammy for best male country vocal performance.

    Paying tribute to the singer on Twitter, Keith Urban said: "‏If I'm blessed enough to make it there, I look forward to you giving me the grand tour. Rest in peace George Jones!!!!!"

    Singer Faith Hill wrote: "We lost one of the best voices God created this morning. Our hearts are saddened to hear that George Jones has passed away... Our thoughts and prayers are with Nancy and all of the family."

    Jones credited his fourth wife Nancy, whom he married in 1983, with helping him clean up. But in 1999 he was seriously injured after driving drunk and crashing into a bridge, leading to another period of rehabilitation.

    Jones was in the middle of a US tour when he was taken into hospital. At the tour's final date in Nashville in November, he was due to be joined by an array of country music stars including Kenny Rogers, Randy Travis, Garth Brook and rapper Kid Rock.

  18. #1343
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    LSD Inventor Albert Hofmann Dead at Age 102




    Albert Hofmann, the pioneering Swiss chemist and advocate of psychedelics who discovered the hallucinogenic properties of LSD, died Tuesday. He was 102.
    Hofmann reportedly died of a heart attack at his home in Basel, Switzerland.
    Hofmann’s most famous discovery happened on April 16, 1943. He was researching the synthesis of a lysergic acid compound, LSD-25, when he inadvertently absorbed a bit through his fingertips. Intrigued by the effect it had on his perception, Hofmann decided further exploration was warranted. Three days later, on April 19, he ingested 250 micrograms of LSD, embarking on the first full-fledged acid trip. That day became known among LSD fans as “bicycle day” because Hofmann began experiencing the drug’s intense effects on his bicycle trip home from the lab.
    In his autobiography, LSD, My Problem Child, Hofmann remembered his discovery this way:
    “In a dreamlike state, with eyes closed (I found the daylight to be unpleasantly glaring), I perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors. After some two hours this condition faded away.”
    The experience led Hofmann to begin experimenting with other hallucinogens and he became an advocate of their use, in both the arenas of psychoanalysis and personal growth. He was critical of LSD’s casual use by the counterculture during the ’60s, accusing rank amateurs of hijacking the drug he still refers to as
    “medicine for the soul” without understanding either its positive or negative effects.
    In a celebration of Hofmann’s 100th birthday in 2006, Hofmann told the crowd of well-wishers — which included 2,000 researchers, scientists, artists and historians — that “LSD wanted to tell me something. It gave me an inner joy, an open mindedness, a gratefulness, open eyes and an internal sensitivity for the miracles of creation.”
    Hofmann was also the first scientist to synthesize psilocybin, the active ingredient in psilocybin mushrooms, in 1958.

  19. #1344
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    Stepford Wives film director Bryan Forbes dies aged 86



    Bryan Forbes was married to actress Nanette Newman and had two daughters

    Film director Bryan Forbes has died "following a long illness" at the age of 86, a family spokesman has said.

    Forbes' work included the original 1970s horror classic Stepford Wives and Whistle Down The Wind.

    The "giant of cinema" was married to British actress Nanette Newman and had two daughters, TV presenter Emma Forbes and journalist Sarah Standing.

    Forbes died surrounded by his family at his home in Virginia Water, Surrey, family friend Matthew D'Ancona said.

    Forbes was made a CBE in 2004 for services to the arts and to the National Youth Theatre of Great Britain.
    He is simply irreplaceable and it is wholly apt that he died surrounded by his family” - Matthew D'Ancona Family friend

    He was awarded the Dilys Powell Award for outstanding contribution to cinema at the London Film Critics' Circle Awards in 2006.

    Mr D'Ancona said: "Bryan Forbes was a titan of cinema, known and loved by people around the world in the film and theatre industries and known in other fields including politics.

    "He is simply irreplaceable and it is wholly apt that he died surrounded by his family."


    Behind camera

    Forbes, who was born John Theobald Clarke, in east London on 22 July 1926, made his screen acting debut in 1948.

    He landed supporting parts in several notable British films including An Inspector Calls (1954) and The Colditz Story (1955) - but it was not long before screenwriting and directing lured him behind the camera.

    His directing career began in 1961 with Whistle Down the Wind, featuring child star Hayley Mills.

    Forbes directed many more films in the 1960s and early 1970s, including The Wrong Box (1966) and The Raging Moon (1971), which starred Nanette Newman, whom he had married in 1954.

    In 1975, he directed horror classic The Stepford Wives, based on the novel by Ira Levin.

    In 1978 he directed International Velvet, starring Tatum O'Neal.
    He continued directing, writing and acting throughout the 1980s and early 1990s.

  20. #1345
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    Film animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen's career

    Ray Harryhausen, the man who pioneered the use of stop-motion special effects in Hollywood, has died at the age of 92, his family announced on Tuesday. In an era before CGI, Harryhausen used clay monsters and mythical creatures to bring life to live-action adventure films like Clash of the Titans, Valley of the Gwangi and Jason and the Argonauts. He inspired the likes of John Landis, Stephen Spielberg, Peter Jackson, Tim Burton and Guillermo Del Toro, and was awarded both a Bafta and a special Academy Award for his work







    Mighty Joe Young, 1949



    Animal World, 1956



    Earth vs Flying Saucers, 1956



    It Came from Beneath the Sea, 1955



    20 Million Miles To Earth, 1957



    The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, 1958, cyclops animated by Ray Harryhausen



    Harryhausen with storyboards for Mysterious Island, 1961









    One Million Years BC, 1966



    The Valley Of Gwangi, 1969












    Sinbad & The Eye of the Tiger, 1977



    Harryhausen in 2010 with a life-size replica of Medusa from 1981's Clash of the Titans

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    Jeanne Cooper, star of The Young and the Restless, dies aged 84



    Cooper remained a cast member on The Young and the Restless until her death

    American soap actress Jeanne Cooper, who spent 40 years on The Young and the Restless, has died at the age of 84.

    Her son, actor Corbin Bernsen, confirmed she died in her sleep on Wednesday.

    "One of the last great broads in our business - Jeanne Cooper, Mom - is now stirring up trouble in great beyond," her family said, in a statement.

    In 1973 Cooper joined The Young and the Restless as Katherine Chancellor, and remained on the show until her death.

    She received 11 Daytime Emmy nominations and won a best actress in a drama series award in 2008.

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    oops!

  23. #1348
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    Hi-de-Hi! actor Paul Shane dies



    Paul Shane, the actor famous for starring in the 1980s BBC sitcom Hi-de-Hi!, has died, his agent has confirmed.

    His agent said the 72-year-old died surrounded by his family at a hospice in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, earlier on Thursday after a short illness.

    He leave behind his three daughters and six grandchildren. His wife died in 2001.

  24. #1349
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Lick View Post
    Hi-de-Hi! actor Paul Shane dies



    Paul Shane, the actor famous for starring in the 1980s BBC sitcom Hi-de-Hi!, has died, his agent has confirmed.

    His agent said the 72-year-old died surrounded by his family at a hospice in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, earlier on Thursday after a short illness.

    He leave behind his three daughters and six grandchildren. His wife died in 2001.
    Used to enjoy watching Hi de Hi as a kid.

    rip many laughs.

  25. #1350
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    R.I.P Paul. Hi Di Hi was staple viewing in our house too. I don't remember the last time I saw him on the telly. I thought he was dead already tbh.

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