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  1. #3801
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    There's your third musician.

    Can123 can you post the text as well as the link please.
    Yes, OK, I will do so as you asked so nicely.

    Done.

  2. #3802
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    Last edited by SKkin; 14-11-2016 at 06:06 AM.

  3. #3803
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    One of my favourites and his great tour with Jo Cocker and Claudia Laner amongst a host of talent in the Mad dogs and Englishmen


  4. #3804
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    Here early vid with Jo, classic very fast crisp version, one of the great rock songs, the letter


  • #3805
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    Folk inspired, great cover of Dylan song with Jo


  • #3806
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    Quote Originally Posted by can123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    There's your third musician.

    Can123 can you post the text as well as the link please.
    Yes, OK, I will do so as you asked so nicely.

    Done.
    Ayethangyou.

  • #3807
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    Mose Allison, jazz-blues musician and elder statesman to rockers, dies at 89
    Originally published November 15, 2016 at 3:58 pm Updated November 15, 2016 at 4:47 pm



    Mose Allison, a pianist, singer and songwriter who straddled modern jazz and Delta blues, belonging to both styles even as he became a touchstone for British Invasion rockers and folksy troubadours, died on Tuesday at his home in Hilton Head, South Carolina. He was 89.

    His death was confirmed by singer and songwriter Amy Allison, his daughter.

    Mose Allison began his professional career as a piano player, at a time when his style — percussive and jaunty, carried along by a percolating beat — suited the sound of the jazz mainstream. In addition to leading his own trio, he worked with some of the major small-group bandleaders of the late 1950s, including saxophonists Stan Getz and Gerry Mulligan.

    But Allison found greater success, and a singular niche, as a singer of his plain-spoken, pungently observant songs, beginning in the early ‘60s. For the next 50 years, he worked almost exclusively as the leader of his own groups.

    Allison used his cool, clear voice to conversational effect, with an easy blues inflection that harked back to his upbringing in rural Mississippi. Backing himself at the piano, he favored a loose call and response between voice and instrument, or between right and left hands, often taking tangents informed by the complex harmonies and rhythmic feints of bebop. His artistic persona, evident in his stage manner as well as his songs, suggested a distillation of folk wisdom in a knowing but unpretentious package.

    He was especially revered by 1960s English rockers who idolized the blues and who saw in his example an accessible ideal. John Mayall recorded “Parchman Farm,” Allison’s ironic adaptation of a prison blues; so did English rhythm-and-blues singer Georgie Fame. Other songs by Allison found their way onto albums by the Yardbirds, the Kinks and the Clash. The Who based their world-beating anthem “My Generation” partly on his “Young Man Blues,” which the band also featured as the opening track on its 1970 album, “Live at Leeds.” The Foo Fighters did a version of “Young Man Blues” in 2008.

    Allison’s tunes were covered almost as widely by his fellow Americans, including the blues artists Paul Butterfield and Johnny Winter, the country-soul singer Bobbie Gentry and, more recently, the jazz vocalist and pianist Diana Krall. The Pixies, a pace-setting alternative-rock band, named an album track “Allison” in his honor.

    In a 1986 interview with pianist Ben Sidran, conducted for NPR, Allison grouped his material into three categories: slapstick, social comment and personal crisis. “Sometimes,” he added, “all three of those elements wind up in a tune.” Many of his songs inhabit an air of wry amusement or exasperated skepticism, often pivoting on a single phrase.

    He skewered hypocrisies in “Everybody’s Cryin’ Mercy,” recorded by Bonnie Raitt, and mastered the sardonic put-down in “Your Mind Is on Vacation (And Your Mouth Is Working Overtime),” covered by Elvis Costello.

    For all of his elder-statesman eminence in rock, Allison never stopped seeing himself as a jazz artist. “My definition of jazz is music that’s felt, thought and performed simultaneously,” he said in “Ever Since I Stole the Blues,” a 2006 BBC documentary. “And that’s what I’m looking for every night.”

    Mose John Allison Jr. was born on Nov. 11, 1927, on a family cotton farm near Tippo, Mississippi. His mother taught elementary school, and his father, a self-taught stride piano player, owned a general store. A service station across the road had a jukebox, on which Allison heard blues singers like Memphis Minnie and Tampa Red.

    He began taking piano lessons at 5 and was playing in bands as a young teenager — around the same time he wrote his first song, “The 14-Day Palmolive Plan,” a satirical jab at radio commercials in the style of the saxophonist, singer and bandleader Louis Jordan’s jump blues. His main hero then was Nat King Cole, a well-regarded jazz pianist who had begun singing, in a smoothly urbane style, with his trio. For a while Allison also played the trumpet, on local gigs and, after he joined the Army in 1946, with the 179th Army Ground Forces Band.

    Allison had put in a year at the University of Mississippi before his service, and he briefly returned to Ole Miss — one reason, perhaps, for his sobriquet “the William Faulkner of jazz,” popularized by Sidran. But he soon lost interest in his chosen field, chemical engineering. He ended up graduating from Louisiana State University with an English degree and then briefly worked the Southern club circuit.

    Moving to New York City in 1956, he found work as a jazz pianist, initially with saxophonist Al Cohn. Allison joined a successful quintet led by Cohn and his fellow saxophonist Zoot Sims. His style had evolved, in line with modernists like Lennie Tristano and Thelonious Monk, but he still had a trace of the South in his earthy attack and in his untroubled relationship with blues inflection.

    He recorded his debut album, “Back Country Suite,” for Prestige in 1957. A song cycle for piano trio inspired by his down-home roots, it was well reviewed but not a great commercial success. The same was true of “Local Color,” his second album, which introduced “Parchman Farm.” At the time, Allison’s unorthodox musical blend often ran up against preconceived notions of style.

    “In the South, I’m considered an advanced bebop type,” he told DownBeat magazine in 1958. “In New York, I’m considered a country blues-folk type. Actually, I don’t think I’m either. Maybe I’m a little of both.”

    Still, his star rose enough for him to be signed by Columbia Records, which in 1960 released “The Transfiguration of Hiram Brown,” an ambitious suite with a loosely autobiographical theme: the excitement and disillusionment of a young man who has moved from the country to the city. (Allison later returned to this subject on “If You’re Going to the City,” a signature tune.) But “Transfiguration” produced middling sales; Prestige did far better with a 1963 compilation of his vocal sides, simply titled “Mose Allison Sings.”

    By that time, Allison’s move to Atlantic Records had begun to sharpen his reputation as a singer and songwriter. His first album for the label, “I Don’t Worry About a Thing,” released in 1962, introduced several of his best-known tunes, including the title track, a blues that deflates its own trite expression with a caustic addendum: “’Cause I know nothing’s going to be all right.” When Atlantic released “The Word From Mose” in 1964, the album cover featured a memorable tagline next to Allison’s photograph: “Words of wisdom from the jazz sage.”

    Rather than make a pop or rhythm-and-blues album for the label, Allison stuck to his hybrid style and his relatively modest commercial profile. He settled down on Long Island, New York, where he lived for more than 40 years with his family before moving to Hilton Head Island.

    In addition to his daughter Amy, Allison is survived by his wife of 65 years, Audre; two other daughters, Janine and Alissa Allison; a son, John; and two grandchildren.

    While Allison released fewer albums from the mid-1970s on, he never stopped writing songs, in his dryly satirical vein. The title track of one his albums in the ‘80s was “Middle Class White Boy.” A later album — released in the early 1990s, when he was 66 — opens with “Certified Senior Citizen,” followed by its incredulous pushback, “This Ain’t Me.”

    For many years Allison kept up a busy touring schedule, typically with a trio. He reached some of his biggest audiences as an opening act for Van Morrison, who in 1996 made the album “Tell Me Something: The Songs of Mose Allison,” with Sidran and Fame. (Allison turned up as a guest on a couple of tracks.)

    Allison’s final studio album, “The Way of the World,” was released on the British independent label Anti- in 2010. Produced by Joe Henry, who had coaxed him out of semiretirement, it finds him in an autumnal but still trenchant frame of mind, despite plaints to the contrary on the opening tune, “My Brain.” The title track, set at a saunter, has the bittersweet resignation of an old man taking stock of what he’s seen.

    A live album recorded in 2006, “Mose Allison American Legend, Live in California,” was released in 2015.

    In recent years Allison stopped performing but kept receiving accolades. A marker with his name and biographical details was added to the Mississippi Blues Trail in 2012. The next year he was recognized as a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, the highest honor for jazz musicians.

    At the induction ceremony in New York City, Allison accompanied his daughter Amy at the piano in a version of his ballad “Was.” A parlor waltz with connotations both mortal and memorial, it begins with some verb-tense wordplay, quickly turning poignant:

    “When I become was, and we become were / Will there be any sign or a trace / Of the lovely contour of your face? / And will there be someone around / With essentially my kind of sound?”

    Mose Allison, jazz-blues musician and elder statesman to rockers, dies at 89 | The Seattle Times

  • #3808
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    Melvin Laird dies at 94; Nixon's secretary of Defense, ended the draft



    Melvin Robert Laird, who as President Nixon's secretary of Defense ended the draft, created the all-volunteer armed forces and ordered the Pentagon's drawdown of military personnel from the Vietnam War, died Wednesday. He was 94.

    The first former congressman to serve as Defense secretary, Laird died in Florida, according to Laird's grandson, Raymond Dennis Large III.

    Laird, a Republican, served nine terms in the House of Representatives from Wisconsin at a time when camaraderie marked the chamber. At the Pentagon, he helped improve the Defense Department's relationship with Congress by pruning budget requests without any real harm to national security.

    After Richard Nixon was elected president in 1968, Laird lobbied him to appoint Sen. Henry “Scoop” Jackson (D-Wash.) as secretary of Defense. But Jackson, under pressure from fellow Democrats not to give Nixon a bipartisan Cabinet during the Vietnam War, declined the offer, so Nixon insisted Laird take it. But Laird knew that White House interference could make his life at the Pentagon miserable. In a remarkable maneuver, he got Nixon to agree that Laird, not the president, would have final say on all appointments and decisions.

    “To my surprise, he not only agreed, he actually put it in writing,” Laird recalled. “I was trapped, so I accepted.” The hands-off memo — coupled with Laird’s iron-fisted instruction to his generals and staffers that they were to report all contacts with the White House to him — meant the Pentagon was spared involvement in the Watergate scandal that shadowed many other agencies. White House Chief of Staff H.R. “Bob” Haldeman and top aide John D. Erlichman — the twosome were nicknamed the Berlin Wall in reference to their protection of the president — tried to get the National Security Agency to help the White House spy on political foes. Laird made sure they could not.

    “I was always proud of that,” Laird told CBS newsman Bob Schieffer. “And it wasn't because the White House didn't try to draw some of our people into it.”

    Bob Froehlke, a friend from grade school whom Laird brought to Washington to be his secretary of the Army, said that from the day he began work at the Pentagon, Laird devised how to “get out with honor” from Vietnam. “From then on, we were slowly winding down.”

    In early 1969, U.S. troop strength in Vietnam was at 549,500. By May 1972, the number stood at 69,000. U.S. combat deaths also declined dramatically for the peak year of 1968.

    In 2005, 30 years after the Vietnam War ended, Laird penned an article for Foreign Affairs, comparing the quagmire of Vietnam to the deteriorating situation in Iraq. The publication, the voice of the Council of Foreign Relations, reported that Laird's piece garnered a record number of hits on its website.

    When he became Defense secretary, Laird wrote, he changed the Pentagon's goal from “applying maximum pressure against the enemy to one of giving maximum assistance to South Vietnam to fight its own battles.” He argued that U.S. policy in Iraq should have made that essential calculation “even before the first shot was fired.”

    During his four years at the Pentagon, Laird instituted a lottery for the draft, which had been in existence since 1939, to even out the odds among all eligible males. In 1973, he ended the draft altogether in favor of an all-volunteer military. He was credited with Vietnamization — a program to expand, equip and train South Vietnam's forces and give them a larger combat role — and in his article defended the cause of seeking democracy for Southeast Asia.

    Born in Omaha on Sept. 1, 1922, Laird graduated from Carleton College in Northfield, Minn., in 1942 and entered the U.S. Navy as an enlisted man. He received an ensign's commission in April 1944 and served on the destroyer Maddox in the Pacific. He received shrapnel wounds during a kamikaze attack.

    Laird left the service in April 1946 and soon entered the Wisconsin state Senate, succeeding his recently deceased father.

    “He was a professional politician and very proud of it,” said Froehlke. “He felt politics was honorable.”

    Laird was elected to the House of Representatives in 1952 and was reelected eight consecutive times.

    Those were the days when civility reigned in Washington. Republican Laird and Democrat Gaylord Nelson campaigned for each other in Wisconsin. “He proved you could be very partisan and have friends on the other side of the aisle,” said Froehlke.

    Laird became a favorite of the Washington press corps at the Pentagon by inviting them into the process and delighting them when he outwitted the president he served. When he left the post, reporters gave him a football that said, “Laird, 194, Press, 0.”

    And he was as much an expert on health policy — he turned down a chance to be Nixon's secretary of Health, Education and Welfare (the Department of Health and Human Services since 1980) — as military affairs.

    In an interview in 2006, Laird cited some of his accomplishments in the health field. In tandem with Rep. John Fogarty (D-R.I.) — they were both ranking members on the House appropriations subcommittee on health — Laird helped establish and give muscular support to some of the nation's most important health institutions, including the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, the National Environmental Center in North Carolina and eight National Cancer Centers.

    “During the 1950s and 1960s we went to the floor of the House in agreement,” Laird recalled. “We'd stand there together in bipartisan agreement. We would never let anyone amend the bills one way or another.”

    He returned to government briefly in June 1973 as Nixon's counselor to the president for domestic affairs. With his reputation and integrity intact, he resigned in February 1974 as the Watergate crisis deepened around Nixon. Laird became a senior counselor for national and international affairs for Reader's Digest magazine.

    In retirement he helped raise money for the Melvin R. Laird Center for Medical Research in Marshfield, Wis. When the center was dedicated in 1997, former President Ford spoke, saying few public figures “have been tested by events or have so confirmed the confidence of their admirers as Mel Laird in those days of tumult and challenge,” he said. Nelson spoke too, recalling that when they served together in the Wisconsin state Senate, Laird often provided the required fifth vote that would allow the four Democrats in attendance to start a roll call vote. “I was grateful for his statesman-like generosity,” he said.

    Froehlke, who headed the capital campaign that raised $12.5 million for the Laird Center, said that “$5 million came from people, many of whom didn't know there was a Marshfield clinic. But they knew Mel Laird. They knew he would not back anything that wasn't important for the city, his state and his country.

    Melvin Laird dies at 94; Nixon's secretary of Defense, ended the draft - LA Times

  • #3809
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    Denton Cooley, Texas surgeon who performed first successful heart transplant in U.S., dies at 96
    by Thomas H. Maugh II



    Denton Cooley, the technically brilliant and unusually dexterous Texas surgeon who performed the first successful heart transplant in the United States and the world's first implantation of a wholly artificial heart, died Friday. He was 96.

    Dubbed “Dr. Wonderful” by the media, Cooley was the leading expert on congenital heart defects in children, pioneered use of the heart-lung machine that made open-heart surgery possible, co-developed a technique for repairing torn aortic aneurysms, developed the techniques of “bloodless” heart surgery and was one of the first and most successful proponents of the coronary artery bypass graft for treating blocked blood vessels.

    “What he did, more than anyone else, was make heart surgery safe,” heart surgeon Dr. O. Howard Frazier of the Texas Heart Institute in Houston told The Times in 1988.

    Cooley's team at the institute, which he founded in 1962, conducted more than 100,000 open-heart surgeries over the course of four decades, with Cooley himself performing as many as 25 per day. Throughout the 1960s and ’70s, it was the place to go for heart surgery — declining in importance only after other institutions and surgeons began to develop comparable proficiency.

    In 1967, the International Surgical Society awarded Cooley its highest honor, citing him as “the most valuable surgeon of the heart and blood vessel anywhere in the world.”

    In his autobiography, “One Life,” South African heart surgeon Dr. Christiaan Barnard wrote about observing Cooley in surgery: “It was the most beautiful surgery I had ever seen .... Every movement had a purpose and achieved its aim. Where most surgeons would take three hours, he could do the same operation in one hour. It went forward like a broad river — never obvious in haste, yet never going back .... No one in the world, I knew, could equal it.”

    During a trial later in his career, Cooley was asked by a lawyer if he thought he was the greatest heart surgeon in the world. Cooley replied yes.

    “Don't you think that is being rather immodest?” the lawyer asked. “Perhaps,” he replied. “But remember, I am under oath.”

    Cooley joined the Baylor University College of medicine and the affiliated Methodist Hospital in Houston in 1951, where he was united with the equally famous heart surgeon, Dr. Michael DeBakey. Their commingled careers led to great triumphs and intense bitterness for both men.

    While working with DeBakey, Cooley developed a new technique for repairing aortic aneurysms, bulging weak spots in the artery leading to the heart that can rupture unexpectedly, causing the patient to bleed to death.

    The two also perfected a heart-lung machine — a device that would circulate and oxygenate a patient's blood while his heart was being repaired — that DeBakey had been working on for two decades, using it successfully for the first time in 1955.

    But as the pair's rivalry got more intense, Cooley chafed under it until 1960, when he moved his practice to the nearby St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital and Texas Children's Hospital. A 1970 article in Life magazine quoted a colorful administrator at Houston’s Texas Medical Center as saying, “Denton just got tired of sucking hind tit.”

    During the next decade, Cooley became famous for his work with congenital heart defects in children, where his surgical skill was especially important because of the small size of their hearts.

    Among other things, he perfected a procedure for removing pulmonary embolisms — clots that form in the lungs — a problem that other physicians had been unable to overcome. He slit open the pulmonary artery and branches to remove clots, then squeezed the lungs flat to force out inaccessible clots.

    Cooley and his team also made great improvements in techniques for implanting artificial aortic and mitral valves to replace diseased valves. He reported in 1967 that the death rate for the procedure had declined from 70% in 1962 to about 8% five years later.

    In December of that same year, Barnard reported that he had performed a heart transplant in Cape Town, South Africa. Within the next month, two American surgeons, including Dr. Norman Shumway, unsuccessfully attempted the procedure.

    On May 3, 1968, Cooley transplanted a heart into Everett Thomas, 47, whose heart valves were deteriorating. The donor was a 15-year-old girl who had committed suicide. Thomas survived for 204 days and the procedure made national headlines.

    During the next year, he transplanted 22 hearts, including three over a five-day period. None led to long-term survival, however, and the procedure fell into disfavor until better immunosuppressive drugs were developed.

    His second transplant also sparked a legal controversy, when he used the heart from a brain-dead victim of a barroom brawl — although the term brain dead had not yet come into use. Two laborers involved in the fight were indicted for the death by a grand jury, but their lawyer argued that the actual moment of death came when surgeons removed the still-beating heart from the victim's body. The charges were dismissed because of the confusion.

    After a conference in Cape Town the following year to consider the ramifications of brain death, Cooley said, “I look upon the heart only as a pump, the servant of the brain. Once the brain is gone, the heart is unemployed. Then we must find it other employment.”

    Cooley's strained relationship with DeBakey came to a head on April 4, 1969, when, unable to obtain a donor heart for a transplant, he implanted an artificial heart into 47-year-old Haskell Karp. Karp survived for 65 hours with the device operating in his chest, but died of complications the day after a donor heart was finally transplanted.

    DeBakey charged that Cooley and Dr. Domingo Liotta of Argentina, a former member of DeBakey's staff, had used an artificial heart developed by DeBakey. He also accused Cooley of violating federal guidelines on human experimentation by implanting the device before its efficacy had been proved in animals.

    Cooley insisted that he and Liotta had developed the device in his own lab using private funds and that the only authorization he needed to test it was the patient's permission. He called the procedure “a desperate, rather drastic maneuver” to save a dying patient.

    A special Baylor committee concluded that Cooley had violated both federal and university experimental guidelines and asked him to sign a pledge to submit any future human research plans for approval. Cooley claimed DeBakey was trying to block his research and resigned from Baylor, becoming surgeon-in-chief of the Texas Heart Institute.

    Karp's widow filed a $4.5-million lawsuit against Cooley and St. Luke's, charging that her husband had been the subject of inappropriate human experimentation, but the suit was dismissed in 1972. The Supreme Court ultimately upheld the dismissal.

    Cooley's split with DeBakey was not healed until 2007, when DeBakey was 99 and Cooley 87.

    Denton Arthur Cooley was born Aug. 22, 1920, in Houston. His grandfather was a successful real estate developer and his father was a dentist who also invested profitably in real estate — a family history that later came back to bite him.

    Shy and insecure at first, he gained confidence by applying himself in school and athletics, playing tennis and basketball, especially after he grew to 6 feet, 4 inches tall. He enrolled in zoology at the University of Texas, where he starred on the varsity basketball team — becoming a lifelong fan of the team.

    Graduating in 1941, he entered the Texas College of Medicine in Galveston before transferring to Johns Hopkins, where he obtained his medical degree in 1944.

    He remained there for two years as an intern and resident before joining the Army, which had underwritten his education. He served as chief of surgical services at the station hospital in Linz, Austria, and was discharged in 1948 with the rank of captain.

    At Hopkins, Cooley had been taken under the wing of Dr. Albert Blalock, a noted heart surgeon. In 1944, Blalock permitted him to assist in the first surgery to correct the congenital heart defect of a “blue baby,” whose malfunctioning heart prevented him from getting adequate oxygen. That experience inspired him to make heart surgery his specialty.

    After completing his military service, he took another two years to complete his residency, then went to London to work with Dr. Russell Brock, who perfected techniques for operating on heart valves ravaged by disease, for a year before returning to Houston.

    Cooley prospered there, both academically and financially, investing heavily in Houston’s booming, petroleum-fueled real estate market. By 1980, Forbes magazine estimated his net worth at $40 million and growing.

    Financial disaster struck in 1988 when, following the collapse of the Houston real estate market, Cooley was forced to declare bankruptcy with debts of almost $100 million. At least some of the debt was accrued through risky investments with his real estate broker son-in-law Costa Kaldis.

    Ironically, the bankruptcy made him even more popular with the public. “Here I was, perceived as not only a great surgeon, but also a financial genius, a huge success, an athlete, someone who does everything well,” he told The Times later that year. “Now they can bring it into clearer perspective.”

    Cooley spent his limited free time with his family — who often had to rise very early in the morning or stay up late at night to see him — playing golf and playing upright bass with his all-physician band, the Heartbeats.

    Among his many honors were the Medal of Freedom, awarded by President Ronald Reagan in 1984; the Rene Leriche Prize, the highest honor of the International Surgical Society; and the National Medal of Technology.

    Denton Cooley, Texas surgeon who performed first successful heart transplant in U.S., dies at 96 - LA Times

  • #3810
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    25 November 2016 at 6:17am
    Brady Bunch mum Florence Henderson dies aged 82



    The Brady Bunch mum Florence Henderson has died aged 82.

    The actress - who played Carol Brady in the 70s sitcom - passed away surrounded by family and friends on Thursday, her manager said.

    The US TV show about a blended family was loved by millions around the world and was later turned into a hit film.

    Brady Bunch mum Florence Henderson dies aged 82 - ITV News

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    Seems she had fun to the end.

    “I like to date, but not every date needs to lead to marriage. I actually have a friend with benefits,” 80-year-old Florence Henderson revealed to Closer Weekly.

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    ^ Surely, not Luig-io, Shirley...

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    Fidel Castro Dead .


    Cuba's former leader Fidel Castro has died aged 90, state TV announces

  • #3814
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    Good innings...

    Cuba's Fidel Castro, former president, dies aged 90
    21 minutes ago



    Fidel Castro, Cuba's former president and leader of the Communist revolution, has died aged 90, his brother has said.

    "The commander in chief of the Cuban revolution died at 22:29 hours this evening (03:29 GMT Saturday)," President Raul Castro said.

    Fidel Castro ruled Cuba as a one-party state for almost 50 years before Raul took over in 2008.
    His supporters said he had given Cuba back to the people. But he was also accused of suppressing opposition.
    Obituary: Fidel Castro
    Fidel Castro: A life in pictures
    Ashen and grave, President Castro told the nation in an unexpected late night broadcast on state television that Fidel Castro had died and would be cremated on Saturday.

    There would now be several days of national mourning on the island.
    Raul Castro ended the announcement by shouting the revolutionary slogan: "Towards victory, always!"

    Barring the occasional newspaper column, Fidel Castro had essentially been retired from political life for some time, the BBC's Will Grant in Havana reports.

    In April, Fidel Castro gave a rare speech on the final day of the country's Communist Party congress.

    He acknowledged his advanced age but said Cuban communist concepts were still valid and the Cuban people "will be victorious".

    "I'll soon be 90," the former president said, adding that this was "something I'd never imagined".

    "Soon I'll be like all the others, "to all our turn must come," Fidel Castro said.
    Castro temporarily handed over power to his brother in 2006 as he was recovering from an acute intestinal ailment.

    Raul Castro officially became president two years later.

    Fidel Castro's key dates

    1926: Born in the south-eastern Oriente Province of Cuba
    1953: Imprisoned after leading an unsuccessful rising against Batista's regime
    1955: Released from prison under an amnesty deal
    1956: With Che Guevara, begins a guerrilla war against the government
    1959: Defeats Batista, sworn in as prime minister of Cuba
    1961: Fights off CIA-sponsored Bay of Pigs invasion by Cuban exiles
    1962: Sparks Cuban missile crisis by agreeing that USSR can deploy nuclear missiles in Cuba
    1976: Elected president by Cuba's National Assembly
    1992: Reaches an agreement with US over Cuban refugees
    2008: Stands down as president of Cuba due to health issues
    Throughout the Cold War, Fidel Castro was Washington's bete noire.
    An accomplished tactician on the battlefield, he and his small army of guerrillas overthrew the military leader Fulgencio Batista in 1959 to widespread popular support.
    Within two years of taking power, he declared the revolution to be Marxist-Leninist in nature and allied the island nation firmly to the Soviet Union.
    Yet, despite the constant threat of a US invasion as well as the long-standing economic embargo on the island, Castro managed to maintain a communist revolution in a nation just 90 miles (145km) off the coast of Florida.
    Despised by his critics as much as he was revered by his followers, he outlasted ten US presidents and defied scores of attempts on his life by the CIA.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-38114953

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    British photographer famed for his pictures of teenage girls is found dead days after being accused of sexually assaulting four children in France

    • Photographer David Hamilton, 83, was found dead in Paris aged 83
    • Radio presenter Flavie Flament claimed she was 13 when he assaulted her
    • Three other women came forward - but they are too old for a prosecution
    • Hamilton was known for his soft-focus portraits of young, often nude, girls
    By Peter Allen and Rory Tingle For Mailonline
    Published: 22:11 GMT, 25 November 2016 | Updated: 02:12 GMT, 26 November 2016
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    David Hamilton stands in front of one of his photographs taken during the late 1970s at a 2007 exhibition

    A British photographer known for his soft-focus portraits of teenage girls has been found dead aged 83.
    David Hamilton was facing child rape accusations in France - but his alleged victims are now too old for a prosecution.
    Mr Hamilton, who lived alone in the French capital, was found in 'an asphyxiated state' by emergency workers on Thursday evening.
    'They reached him soon after 10pm, and tried to revive him, but he died from a heart attack,' said a source close to the investigation into the death.
    Mr Hamilton is said to have assaulted a number of youngsters over a long career in his adopted country.
    Flavie Flament, a 42-year-old Paris radio presenter, said she was only 13 when Mr Hamilton assaulted her at a nudist camp in Cap d'Agde, in the South of France.
    It was allegedly during a photoshoot in the mid-1980s after Mr Hamilton persuaded her parents to let him work alone with her on a shoot.
    'Very quickly his behavour altered' said Ms Flavie.
    'He raped me in the shower,' said Ms Flavie, who was working with the three other women to try and see Mr Hamilton prosecuted.
    Ms Flament's disturbing public statement has now prompted at least three other women to come forward, but they are all now in their 40s and 50s.
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    Under French law, the age limit for pressing charges of rape of a minor is 38, meaning that the women have passed the statute of limitations. '
    Laurence Rossignol, France's Minister for Families, Childhood and Women's Rights, had confirmed that the law was being reviewed.
    The aim was to bring France in line with countries like Britain, which has no statute of limitations for sex crimes, she said.
    'I would like to know how (prosecutions) happen elsewhere, so that we may also be able to change things in France,' Ms Rossignol said earlier this week.

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    Pictured: Police gathered near the Paris apartment where David Hamilton was found dead


    +7


    Mr Hamilton, who lived alone in the French capital, was found in 'an asphyxiated state' by emergency workers on Thursday evening

    In turn, Ms Flavie said: 'Today, victims of rape, when they are children, have up to the age of thirty eight to file a complaint, and they have to live with this trauma until the end of their lives. Meanwhile, their torturer can sleep quietly saying that it is a closed case.;
    Mr Hamilton, who fiercely denied any wrongdoing, was faced with the allegation when Ms Flament wrote a newly published book called The Consolation.
    It does not name the photographer directly, but his portrait of her as a schoolgirl is on the front cover, and she has since confirmed that she believes him to have been a rapist.
    Ms Flament told France 2 TV station: 'When I chose with my publisher to put this photo on the cover, I knew that it would prompt other testimonies.
    'And I can tell you that I wasn't the only one to have gone through this abuse, this rape by this photographer. I knew I couldn't be the only one.'

    +7


    Flavie Flament (pictured), a 42-year-old Paris radio presenter, said she was only 13 when Mr Hamilton assaulted her at a nudist camp in Cap d'Agde, in the South of France


    +7


    Mr Hamilton's work depicting early-teenage girls has caused controversy in the past, with some of the images classed as indecent (pictured, the film poster of the Hamilton film - Premiers Desirs)

    Mr Hamilton had issued a statement saying he was 'particularly outraged by the total absence of respect of the presumption of innocence'.
    The statement added that Mr Hamilton would 'make no further comment on criminal behaviour that certain people attribute to him and of which he is not the author'.
    In interviews with the latest edition of Nouvel Observateur magazine, two other alleged victims recount how a 'smiling' Mr Hamilton also attacked them when he was in his 50s.
    Like Ms Flament, he is said to have isolated the 13 and 14 year old from their parents at Cap d'Agde, where Mr Hamilton owned a flat.
    They said he stalked the beach every day 'in such of models' while accompanied 'by a very young slim blonde girl.

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    +7



    Mr Hamilton was well known because his posters, books and other work were sold all over the world, while his films were watched by thousands

    Mr Hamilton was well known because his posters, books and other work was sold all over the world, while films such as First Desires (1983) were watched by thousands.
    'To be noticed by him was to be the chosen one,' said one of his alleged victims, referred to only as Alice. 'When he offered to do a trial shoot, my father was so proud, his eyes were twinkling'.
    Mr Hamilton's work depicting early-teenage girls, often nude, has caused controversy in the past, with some of the images classed as indecent and even pornographic.
    Speaking before Mr Hamilton's death, Ms Flavie added: 'I chose to run the risk of being attacked by David Hamilton, for the simple reason that I felt I was supported by the population, magistrates, politicians and other witnesses.
    'I chose to run the risk that, today, I will also befound guilty of defamation, and my rapist can now file a complaint against me.'
    Mr Hamilton had said he was indeed taking his alleged victims to court, saying: 'Clearly the instigator of this media lynching is looking for her fifteen minutes of fame by defaming me in her novel.'


  • #3816
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Good innings...

    Cuba's Fidel Castro, former president, dies aged 90
    21 minutes ago



    Fidel Castro, Cuba's former president and leader of the Communist revolution, has died aged 90, his brother has said.

    "The commander in chief of the Cuban revolution died at 22:29 hours this evening (03:29 GMT Saturday)," President Raul Castro said.

    Fidel Castro ruled Cuba as a one-party state for almost 50 years before Raul took over in 2008.
    His supporters said he had given Cuba back to the people. But he was also accused of suppressing opposition.
    Obituary: Fidel Castro
    Fidel Castro: A life in pictures
    Ashen and grave, President Castro told the nation in an unexpected late night broadcast on state television that Fidel Castro had died and would be cremated on Saturday.

    There would now be several days of national mourning on the island.
    Raul Castro ended the announcement by shouting the revolutionary slogan: "Towards victory, always!"

    Barring the occasional newspaper column, Fidel Castro had essentially been retired from political life for some time, the BBC's Will Grant in Havana reports.

    In April, Fidel Castro gave a rare speech on the final day of the country's Communist Party congress.

    He acknowledged his advanced age but said Cuban communist concepts were still valid and the Cuban people "will be victorious".

    "I'll soon be 90," the former president said, adding that this was "something I'd never imagined".

    "Soon I'll be like all the others, "to all our turn must come," Fidel Castro said.
    Castro temporarily handed over power to his brother in 2006 as he was recovering from an acute intestinal ailment.

    Raul Castro officially became president two years later.

    Fidel Castro's key dates

    1926: Born in the south-eastern Oriente Province of Cuba
    1953: Imprisoned after leading an unsuccessful rising against Batista's regime
    1955: Released from prison under an amnesty deal
    1956: With Che Guevara, begins a guerrilla war against the government
    1959: Defeats Batista, sworn in as prime minister of Cuba
    1961: Fights off CIA-sponsored Bay of Pigs invasion by Cuban exiles
    1962: Sparks Cuban missile crisis by agreeing that USSR can deploy nuclear missiles in Cuba
    1976: Elected president by Cuba's National Assembly
    1992: Reaches an agreement with US over Cuban refugees
    2008: Stands down as president of Cuba due to health issues
    Throughout the Cold War, Fidel Castro was Washington's bete noire.
    An accomplished tactician on the battlefield, he and his small army of guerrillas overthrew the military leader Fulgencio Batista in 1959 to widespread popular support.
    Within two years of taking power, he declared the revolution to be Marxist-Leninist in nature and allied the island nation firmly to the Soviet Union.
    Yet, despite the constant threat of a US invasion as well as the long-standing economic embargo on the island, Castro managed to maintain a communist revolution in a nation just 90 miles (145km) off the coast of Florida.
    Despised by his critics as much as he was revered by his followers, he outlasted ten US presidents and defied scores of attempts on his life by the CIA.

    Fidel Castro, Cuba's leader of revolution, dies at 90 - BBC News
    Thirteen Days (2000) - IMDb

    Must dig this out for another view...

  • #3817
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    I never understood why the U.S. didn't/doesn't invade and take the bloody place.
    Considering what they're up against in the middle east it'd be a walk in the park.

  • #3818
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    Cuz the Ruskies (at key moments) supported Cuba, and WW3 was not an attractive path? Later on, after Vietnam, military action was not going to happen.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo
    I never understood why the U.S. didn't/doesn't invade and take the bloody place.

  • #3819
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    So, where does one buy those books?

    Quote Originally Posted by CR7CristianoRonaldo
    Photographer David Hamilton, 83, was found dead in Paris aged 83

  • #3820
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    'Firefly,' 'Barney Miller' star Ron Glass dies at 71



    Actor Ron Glass -- who often played smart, sarcastic and stylish characters -- has died from respiratory failure at age 71, TMZ reports.

    Glass is best known for his role as the spiritual and mysterious character Shepherd Book in Joss Whedon's sci-fi TV series "Firefly" and its movie sequel "Serenity."


    Glass is also celebrated for his role as the dapper Detective Ron Harris on the popular '70s police sitcom "Barney Miller."

    He played the sarcastic and intellectual detective opposite Hal Linden and Abe Vigoda. Glass earned his first and only Emmy nomination for the role in 1982.

    More recently, Glass appeared on "Agents of SHIELD," "CSI" and "Major Crimes."

    Fellow "Firefly" actors and creator Joss Whedon paid tribute online to their beloved co-star's passing.

    "Ron Glass was one of the greatest actors to work with," "Firefly" co-star Alan Tudyk tweeted today. "His laugh was beyond infectious and his generosity was ever present."

    "Ron Glass was also a sassy smart ass and I prize that very much," Tudyk continued. "A leaf on the wind."

    https://www.cnet.com/news/ron-glass-...athan-fillion/

  • #3821
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    William Trevor
    Novelist

    William Trevor KBE was an Irish novelist, playwright and short story writer. One of the elder statesmen of the Irish literary world, he was widely regarded as one of the greatest contemporary writers of short stories in the English language.

    Born: May 24, 1928, Mitchelstown
    Died: November 20, 2016, Somerset, United Kingdom

    Spouse: Jane Ryan (m. 1952–2016)
    Awards: Hawthornden Prize, Costa Book of the Year, more
    Movies: My House in Umbria, The Ballroom of Romance, Felicia's Journey, Secret Orchards





    Last edited by KEVIN2008; 27-11-2016 at 08:21 PM.

  • #3822
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    I never understood why the U.S. didn't/doesn't invade and take the bloody place.
    Considering what they're up against in the middle east it'd be a walk in the park.
    It would be like invading a mini-Afghanistan.

    No fucker likes them, so what's the point?

  • #3823
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    After a long period of tense negotiations, an agreement was reached between President John F. Kennedy and Khrushchev. Publicly, the Soviets would dismantle their offensive weapons in Cuba and return them to the Soviet Union, subject to United Nations verification, in exchange for a U.S. public declaration and agreement never to invade Cuba again without direct provocation

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuban_Missile_Crisis

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    Fritz Weaver dead: US star of stage and screen dies aged 90

    AMERICAN star Fritz Weaver has died aged 90, it has been confirmed.

    PUBLISHED: 11:51, Mon, Nov 28, 2016 | UPDATED: 12:46, Mon, Nov 28, 2016



    The Tony Award-winning character actor, who played a German Jewish doctor slain by the Nazis in the 1978 mini-series Holocaust, passed away on Saturday at his home in Manhattan.

    Weaver's death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Bruce Ostler, but no cause of death was stated.

    He was nominated for an Emmy award for portraying the role of Dr. Josef Weiss, the patriarch of a Jewish family in the NBC series Holocaust where his character was first sent to the Warsaw ghetto and then to Auschwitz where he was murdered.

    The Pennsylvania-born star was also known for his work in science fiction and fantasy television roles including The Twilight Zone, Night Gallery, The X-Files and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

    The father-of-two featured in many films in his career that spanned more than 50 years, such as films Fail Safe, Demon Seed and The Thomas Crown Affair.

    The actor had a successful career in Broadway where he won a Tony award in 1970 for his role in the drama "Child's Play" about the malevolent environment at an exclusive Roman Catholic school for boys.

    The Tony Awards paid tribute to the star on Twitter: "Sad to report the passing of @TheTonyAwards-winning actor #FritzWeaver. Rest in peace."

    But winning the award did not catapult Mr. Weaver into stardom. "What I remember is a vast silence from the phone," he said, "because people said, ‘We won’t offer it, now, because we can’t offer him enough money.'"

    He also starred in many Shakespeare productions including Hamelet, King Lear and Macbeath.

    In 2010, the actor was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame and one of his last roles was his appearance in the 2015 Adam Sandler movie, The Cobbler.

    Weaver married actress Rochelle Oliver in 1997. He is survived by his daughter, Lydia Weaver; his son, Anthony; and a grandson.

    His sister Mary Dodson died in February of this year aged 83.


    Fritz Weaver dead: US star of stage and screen dies aged 90 | Celebrity News | Showbiz & TV | Daily Express

  • #3825
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    In Memoriam Mark Taimanov (1926-2016)

    by Dagobert Kohlmeyer
    Mark Taimanov is dead. The Russian Grandmaster died last night in his hometown St. Petersburg. The chess world mourns a great personality of our game. Mark Taimanow leaves his fourth wife Nadjeshda and two children aged 12 behind. When I called his widow to express my sympathies her voice is calm and collected. „Mark had been seriously ill for one-and-a-half years. And he reached such a high age. For that we are all grateful.“


    In February the grandmaster celebrated his 90th birthday. Back then Taimanov mentioned in an interview that 80 students studied at in his chess school which is situated close to Nevsky Prospect. „It will continue," Nadja assures.
    Mark Taimanov was a multi-talent. His first chess teacher was no other than Mikhail Botvinnik. Botvinnik predicted a great chess career for the 11-year old. But Taimanov also delighted countless people at home and abroad as concert pianist. He often toured with his first wife Ljubow Bruk and recorded prize-winning records.
    Ljubov Bruk and Mark Taimanov at the piano

    Mark Taimanov 1970
    Taimanov was Soviet Champion, olympic gold medalist and World Championship Candidate. In 1971 he played a legendary candidate match against Bobby Fischer in Vancouver - Taimanov lost 0-6.
    During his long career Mark Taimanov met great chess players but also a large number of renowned personalities such as Churchill, Khrushchev and Fidel Castro. The latter, who died on Friday, was also born in 1926. In 1993 and 1994 Mark Taimanow became World Senior Champion. In 2004, at the age of 78, he became father of twins.

    The Taimanov family, 2012 in Dresden
    Artur Jussupov: "Mark was a positive person"
    Artur Jussupov, too, was distressed when he heard about the death of Mark Taimanov. On the phone he said: „I was lucky to meet Mark more than once. He was a very positive person. Yesterday, during one of my lessons, I happened to show a game we had played against each other. Taimanov had a good positional style. Even when he was not young anymore he proved his class. When he had the position under control, he could play with great ease. But he lacked doggedness, the killer instinct which you need to make it to the very top. Maybe this was due to Mark Taimanovs easy way of living. The defeat against Fischer certainly affected his self-confidence. After that he was no longer part of the world's top. But Taimanov has never lost his humor. He liked to tell wonderful stories about his long chess life. I will remember him as a person with a positive charisma.“

    Mark Taimanov, Boris Spassky, Evgeny Vasiukov 2012 in Dresden
    Taimanov followed current events in the chess world until last. Acouple of years he came with his family to Dresden to meet old companions during the "Meeting of Grandmasters 75+". The talks with him were a treat - not least for the chess journalist in me.

    Mark Taimanov
    Apart from chess and music Mark Taimanov had another passion... the ladies. His fourth (!) wife Nadjeshda (who today is 55) knew this only too well. Twenty years ago, during the match Ladies vs Veterans in London, I had the chance to talk with Mark Taimanov and her.
    Mark, what do you put first in life?

    Women are my greatest passion. Music and chess only follow next. I want to quote the words of the great Siegbert Tarrasch: „Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make man happy.“

    You started to play chess relatively late in life...

    Yes, I was already eleven years old. Funnily enough, music and film brought me to chess.

    What happened?

    When I was seven years old I learned to play the piano at a musical school in Leningrad. A bit later, in 1937, they made the film "Beethoven's concert". I was cast to play the leading role but in the film I did not play a piano player but a violinist.

    That is, you also learned to play this instrument?

    Yes, I had to. Incidentally, the film was a huge success and won first prize at the International Film Festival in Paris. Suddenly I was a well-known actor.

    And chess?

    At that time I also went to the recently opened Pioneer Palace in Leningrad were the most talented girls and boys were instructed in various areas of culture. When I was asked what else I am interested in, my inner voice said: 'Go to the chess club!' Which I did.

    Who was your first teacher?

    I had some rudimentary knowledge about the game. But the director of the chess club was no less than our great Mikhail Botvinnik who at that time lived in Leningrad. He was a remarkable teacher. Thanks to him my chess career started.


    And what happened to your musical talent?

    After World War II I finished the conservatory in Leningrad and together with my first wife I toured for many years in the Soviet Union and in many countries of the world. We belonged to the world's five best piano duos and also made records. My chess career ran parallel to that. I played rather successfully and even managed to become a candidate for the World title.

    Who are your favorite composers?

    Why don't you ask which openings I like best? That would be easier to answer. But well, the great Bach, Mozart, the romantics Chopin, Schumann and the Russians Tschaikovsky and Rakhmaninov.

    And which openings are you particularly fond of?

    With Black the Nimzo-Indian and the Sicilian, of course. I wrote a number of books about these openings, and these book also appeared in Germany. I also wrote a book about the English Opening.

    But you also published other titles...

    Yes, for instance the book "How I became Fischer's victim".

    Well, you can say that again.

    In my candidates match against Fischer in Vancouver 1971 I went down like a lead balloon, but I am still happy to have played this match against Fischer. He was a unique phenomenon.

    The sixth game of the match Fischer vs Taimanov 1971 in Vancouver
    You are married for the fourth time. Are you in favor of polygamy?
    I have to admit that I have never been particularly monogamous in this area of life.
    Will Nadjeshda be your last wife?

    Yes, that is for sure. I officially commit myself here: she is my swan song and occupies a very special place in my life.

    Why?

    No woman is like the other. Nadja has something of everything. I love her very much, and not only because she is so young. I won't find a better one. Among all other things she is also an excellent housewife. You should try her pelmeni! A restaurant in Zurich prepares this Russian specialty after Nadja's recipe.

    Nadjeshda, are you sure of Mark?

    Nadja Taimanov: I don't really know. One of my friends, whose son is in seventh grade, recently said: „Perhaps Mark's next wife sits next to my son in class." - Mark Taimanov: That's a nice joke, but out of the question.
    That's how he was. A man who loved life. Mark, we miss you.
    Translation: Johannes Fischer


    R.I.P...Good innings and sounds like he lived it well.....


    In stark contrast to the grandmaster kid that lost his life today...

    Russian chess master Yuri Yeliseyev dies in Moscow fallRussian chess master Yuri Yeliseyev, 20, has died after apparently plunging from a balcony on the 12th floor of a Moscow apartment block.
    A fellow chess grandmaster, Daniil Dubov, said Yeliseyev had been trying to reach another balcony but slipped.
    Yeliseyev reportedly practised parkour, an urban challenge which involves climbing or leaping across roofs, fences or other man-made obstacles.
    He became world junior chess champion in 2012 and was a grandmaster aged 17.
    He won the Moscow Open 2016 chess tournament and ranked 42nd among Russian grandmasters. His world ranking was 212.
    Russian chess master Yuri Yeliseyev dies in Moscow fall - BBC News

    R.I.P...Silly way to die...Thank fook I survived my youth

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